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  1. #1

    Default Guava Paste into Fruit Leather

    Had an idea to make fruit leather from Guava Paste. Has anyone done this, if so care to share how it was dried? It already is thick so it seems only a short drying time could turn it to a snack leather.

    I recently bought a can of it knowing I will recycle the can into a DIY cooking container. I was surprised to find the paste is a tasty snack when used with cream cheese on Ritz crackers. Quite Yummy! Hmmm, I think I will wander off to the kitchen to have more :-)

    https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=guava+Paste

  2. #2
    Registered User ChuckT's Avatar
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    Yummy stuff, for sure. Guava is hard to find around here (east central Florida) growing conditions are too dry and too sunny (I don't think the tree (?) likes full sun. But when we get down to West Palm Beach/Miami area there's a Cuban bakery that makes Guava pastries that are to die for! Anyway the fruit doesn't last after it's picked and is the only food item I know of that a cat will go out if it's way to bury once it's past ripe!

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  3. #3

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    Ever try guava or passion fruit syrup on ice cream or waffles? We have a glut of both fruits in Hawaii we make paste, syrup, and drinks from. It's a similar process to get either from fresh pulp pr paste. Take paste or deseeded pulp(use a fine wire mesh sieve). Place in sauce pan with some water and cane sugar to taste. Simmer down. It makes a thick syrup. Diluting with water makes a refreshing iced drink better so if mixed with passion juice. POG is almost a staple drink in Hawaii made from passion, orange, and guava juices.

    Guavas, although having been around so long in FL, are non native exotics. In some areas of the world both these species can be very invasive. It's hard to not find Lemon guavas sprouting up among neglected orange grooves in FL. In HI lemon guavas are considered a weed tree spread by animals who deposit the seeds everywhere. Find cattle pastures you'll find Lemon guavas in HI although teh Strawberry guava has become an obnoxious weed in places too. Both the Apple/Yellow/Lemon guava, that are larger and the Cattley or Strawberry guava are found in FL.,the Cattley guava making an attractive decent edible ornamental plant that has small white flowers and interesting colored bark when limbed up. The wood is used for various projects. Both of these species, but especially the Cattley guava are drought tolerant.

  4. #4

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    If interested. UF Extension Service has excellent info.

    http://okeechobee.ifas.ufl.edu/News%...tic.Guavas.htm

  5. #5
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
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    Can't say I've dried guava paste, but I have dried apple sauce and other purees into leather. I have a good old Ronco dehydrator, and it comes with a tray for leather. I'm sure you could use any usual drying technique - just spread it thin and evenly

  6. #6

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    Thank you for the helpful comments.

    I found this hint on the net:

    1. *For a dried consistency, place the cooked paste on wax paper on a wooden board, cover with cheesecloth and set in the sun for two days.
    2. Turn the paste occasionally to expose all surfaces to the sun.

  7. #7

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    I cut it into strips, laid them on a cookie sheet using parchment paper. Placed stainless steel mesh over the top and placed cookie sheet in full sun for most of the day. Tomorrow will turn guava strips over and let dry in full sun all day.

    goya quava 001.JPGgoya quava 002.JPG

    P.S. that's too bad that the guava plant is invasive. :-(

    Our native plants get to be invasive also when taken overseas. Tit for tat suppose.
    Last edited by zelph; 09-19-2016 at 21:37.

  8. #8
    Registered User ChuckT's Avatar
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    Invasive? Not my personal experience.
    The ones (plants) I knew about grew in an overgrown coastal Oak Hammock. When the land owner cleared the undergrowth they went away and never came back. From that I concluded they did best in moist (acidic?) shaded environment. Pity but is what it is.

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  10. #10

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    I made a 10" pancake and rolled 2 strips of the guava up like a hot dog, ate it with a smile on my face....good stuff:-)

  11. #11

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    I'm eating the paste so fast it doesn't have a chance to dry LOL I at some for breakfast....Ritz crackers, cream cheese and quava. Lunch.....quava, cream cheese on whole wheat nut grain bread.

    I should have followed the oven recipe

  12. #12

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    Ok, bought a jar of Nutella Hazelnut Spread and dipped the strips in it and made myself regret it :-(

  13. #13

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    Of the two commonly found "hazel nut/chocolate butter spread" brands - Nutella and Justins - comparably Justins has 1/3 the amount of sugar, 3x as much fiber, and 25 % more protein. The top two ingredients by weight in Nutella are 1) sugar and 2) vegetable oil. In other words there is more sugar or added oil in Nutella than hazelnuts! The top two ingredients by weight in Justins are 1) HAZELNUTS 2 ) ALMONDS.

    http://www.veggirlrd.com/a-nutrition...elnut-spreads/

    http://foodwatch.com.au/blog/additiv...gredients.html

    http://www.builtlean.com/2013/09/16/...butter-review/

  14. #14

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    It is no wonder why it tastes so good with all that sugar

  15. #15

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    Today I found an easy way to slice the paste into strips so I could dry them on a dryer rack. I cut the paste while it's still in the can and then turned the can over and dumped it out onto a plate.

    quava in can.jpg
    guava sliced.jpg


  16. #16

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    is that available at my local grocer?

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by trailmercury View Post
    is that available at my local grocer?
    You need to find a store with an isle that has lots of ethnic foods in it. Hispanic food store will have it more than likely.

    Some ways to enjoy it at home:

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/421579...14547/?lp=true

  18. #18

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    [QUOTE=zelph;2251962]You need to find a store with an isle that has lots of ethnic foods in it. Hispanic food store will have it more than likely.


    So a sure bet would be a Woodmans?

  19. #19

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    [QUOTE=trailmercury;2251966]
    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    You need to find a store with an isle that has lots of ethnic foods in it. Hispanic food store will have it more than likely. So a sure bet would be a Woodmans?
    Yes, a Woodmans would be a sure thing.

    Today I made 2 peanut butter and guava sandwhiches....awesome way to eat natural, un-sweetened pb.

    Also melted down some paste into a syrup by adding just water to the strips of paste. Will be used for pancakes tomorrow morning. I'll add some oatmeal to a small amount of the syrup to make some kind of treat.
    Last edited by zelph; 07-23-2019 at 21:10.

  20. #20

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    We used to eat chunks of guava paste in Bogota, Colombia when I was TDY with the USAF back in 1972.

    If I was gonna process alot of it for backpacking I'd put it in a blender and add sufficient water and blend it up thoroughly and then pour on silicone sheets on my dehydrating trays.

    It would end up sort of like this---

    Trip 156 021-XL.jpg

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