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  1. #1

    Default Help! Days before thru hike and questioning my baselayer

    So I am starting an AZT sobo thru in a few days. It is a bit late but had to go down this way. I am seeing temps come in and for much of the hike highs will be in the 50s. Is this too light of a baselayer?

    http://www.icebreaker.com/en/midlaye...2064_color=003

    I have a great microfleece to throw over it. A wind jacket. And a down just for camp. Should I make last minute switch to heavier baselayer?

  2. #2
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    That depends entirely on your comfort level, as 50s while moving is perfect, balmy hiking weather up in the Whites. I am certain it would work for me, with those layers to deploy for colder temps. That said, the lightest merino I have is 150 weight, never tried 120.

  3. #3

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    I think you're ok with this icebreaker shirt in conjunction with the rest of your kit.

  4. #4

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    I, too, think you'll be fine. As long as you are moving (hiking) you don't need much clothing to stay warm.

    I've seen guys hiking in running shorts well below 50 degrees. Being from Florida, I'm thinking they are crazy, and I'm wearing 2 layers... but I was comfortable wearing 2 layers when it was snowing... as long as I kept moving.

    My main concern is having enough layers to stay warm at camp. If not, be sure that your sleeping bag is your failsafe.

  5. #5

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    It will be cold in the morning when you start hiking but you can just add your fleece or wind jacket until you warm up

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    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    50's is shorts and t-shirt weather. Heck, I've seen people hike in shorts while it was snowing. I wouldnt be concerned until below freezing temps are forecast.

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    I don't think there is such a thing as too light of a base layer. It's your base layer. It's that thing you strip down to in the middle of the day on a hard climb when you are overheating with anything more. It's the next to skin layer that should be comfortable and protect your insulating layer (that which needs to be thick enough for your environment) from you body stink, oils, salts, etc. If it gets colder, add more insulation on top of your base layer. Don't worry about your base layer.

    That being said, I often use base layer pieces as part of my insulation (like the long sleeved mid-weight capaline I am wearing right now over a t-shirt), over top of a very light actual base layer. If that is more along the lines of your concern, then, that is a question about insulation, not a question about base layers.
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    Everyone is different....I hike in shorts, Synthetic T, wind jacket down to mid 40's with no issue and I'm from FL...not sure about what your using for bottoms but I recently bought the $18 Dance Pants as Mags recommended for my Co hike and love them for over shorts when temps drop....i wore them often in conjunction with the wind jacket and was very comfortable in the 30's...wore day and night.....


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  9. #9

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    I run slightly warm compared to others, but I wore a short sleeve tech lite ice breaker short sleeve t- shirt for a thru hike. (4.3 oz for a L). Below 45 degrees, when starting out, I wore a 3.0 oz silk long sleeve over it for the first half hour until I warmed up. I was fine. The only issue was the really light weight merino does not hold up to well over 2000 miles. Lots of small holes. I replaced it with another one after about 1400 miles.

    I found Icebreaker t shirts to be awesome in terms of never stinking. I rinsed mine out each day, usually in the middle of the day before a steep uphill. Helped to keep me cool a little longer. Dried on the body very quickly.

  10. #10
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
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    Not sure about the nomenclature of "base layer" (different parts of the country label things differently) , but your icebreaker hiking shirt looks exactly like my all-time favorite shoulder-season (AKA now) hiking shirt, long sleeve ice breaker brand merino wool 1/4 zip. As already said, you don't need thickness here, you need wicking and such. I love long sleeve 1/4 zips because you can regulate your temps very well with them; sleeves up or down, 1/4 zip at various levels.

    FWIW, I use the same system: lightweight shirt (just like yours), microfleece second layer, UL down sweater and light jacket. I assume you do have a modestly waterproof rain jacket of some sort? If so, you're good to go!

  11. #11

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    I am still looking for modest rain gear. Gone back and forth a lot cause it's AZ during dry season. My wind jacket is somewhat water proof.

  12. #12

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    Modest rain gear: light weight and inexpensive: Frog Toggs

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rybir View Post
    I am still looking for modest rain gear. Gone back and forth a lot cause it's AZ during dry season. My wind jacket is somewhat water proof.
    Don't count on that....more than a drizzle your wet....


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    Quote Originally Posted by Rybir View Post
    I am still looking for modest rain gear. Gone back and forth a lot cause it's AZ during dry season. My wind jacket is somewhat water proof.
    Yeah, consider a Frogg Togg jacket, probably no heavier than your wind jacket. 6 ounces. Cheap, $20 for the set, jacket and pants. Leave the pants at home unless you think you need some more leg warmth than whatever else you're bringing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nsherry61 View Post
    I don't think there is such a thing as too light of a base layer. It's your base layer. It's that thing you strip down to in the middle of the day on a hard climb when you are overheating with anything more. It's the next to skin layer that should be comfortable and protect your insulating layer (that which needs to be thick enough for your environment) from you body stink, oils, salts, etc. If it gets colder, add more insulation on top of your base layer. Don't worry about your base layer.

    That being said, I often use base layer pieces as part of my insulation (like the long sleeved mid-weight capaline I am wearing right now over a t-shirt), over top of a very light actual base layer. If that is more along the lines of your concern, then, that is a question about insulation, not a question about base layers.
    Agree with the opening statement. I believe your base layer should be as light as possible. Need to wear it under rain gear and it gets damp or wet, it dries quick. Hot day, no problem. The question in my mind is whether you need a second layer to supplement in colder temperatures either while moving with your base layer or in camp. Also, you don't say what other clothes you are taking but I would highly recommend a wind shirt and even wind pants. Both are extremely versatile and weigh next to nothing.
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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malto View Post
    Agree with the opening statement. I believe your base layer should be as light as possible. Need to wear it under rain gear and it gets damp or wet, it dries quick. Hot day, no problem. The question in my mind is whether you need a second layer to supplement in colder temperatures either while moving with your base layer or in camp. Also, you don't say what other clothes you are taking but I would highly recommend a wind shirt and even wind pants. Both are extremely versatile and weigh next to nothing.
    I have a Feathered Friends Windjacket and well made Nylon pants. For a second layer I have a fleece, however maybe you are referring to something else.

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