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  1. #1

    Default So how warm is a Nano Puff Jacket?

    Patagroinia uses 60-g Primaloft Gold in their Nano Puff Jacket and it's really thin. and flimsy...

    like, "I find it hard to believe it's much warmer than a wind breaker" thin.

    how warm are these?..

  2. #2

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    Mine is a couple years old and I'm not sure if significant changes have been made to the design. But, I have been pleased with its warmth for the weight. I don't have hard numbers for you, but I suspect I would be comfortable in camp with a base layer and my Pat pull over to around the mid upper 30s. It does seem to shed wind nicely. I usually carry my Montbell down jacket because I get cold easy and it is warmer. But that doesn't mean that the Patagonia is a poor product at all. Packs down well for a synthetic. It's thin enough that you could wear a shell/rain jacket over it easily. As the saying goes, "it's just another arrow in the quiver".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Secondmouse View Post
    Patagroinia uses 60-g Primaloft Gold in their Nano Puff Jacket and it's really thin. and flimsy...

    like, "I find it hard to believe it's much warmer than a wind breaker" thin.

    how warm are these?..
    Honestly, its not much at all.
    I wear mine in low 60s and are comfortable. Even 66 in the house sometimes.
    At 43F , windy, I froze in mine once wearing a heavy cotton sweatshirt

    Activity makes difference obviously, but for sitting /standing around, think 55-65F. About 10 F of added warmth. 55 is pushing it too imo.
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 11-08-2016 at 01:09.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    Honestly, its not much at all.
    I wear mine in low 60s and are comfortable. Even 66 in the house sometimes.
    At 43F , windy, I froze in mine once wearing a heavy cotton sweatshirt

    Activity makes difference obviously, but for sitting /standing around, think 55-65F. About 10 F of added warmth. 55 is pushing it too imo.
    this is what I imagined. it doesn't seem like it would be very warm because it is so thin. Patagroinia's video talks about it sliding under layers but it's windproof and water resistant (DWR).

    so maybe like an insulated wind shirt or a softshell?..

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    Mine was probably a little bit loftier when new, but its not anything now. Its just flat with 1/16" insulation. Ive used the heck out of it. Usually over a fleece.
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 11-08-2016 at 11:41.

  6. #6
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Secondmouse View Post
    Patagroinia uses 60-g Primaloft Gold in their Nano Puff Jacket and it's really thin. and flimsy...

    like, "I find it hard to believe it's much warmer than a wind breaker" thin.

    how warm are these?..
    Keep in mind these UL puff jackets are just layers; they work wonderfully layered with other things, like a wind jacket or other hard shell on top of them. Basically, these UL garments take the place of heavier fleece jackets. My Montbell thermawrap, probably pretty similar to your nano puff is about as warm as a mid-weight fleece, at half the weight or less.

    I wear my MB thermawrap a lot, had it for 7-8 years, probably my favorite go-to mildly insulating layer.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    Mine was probably a little bit loftier when new, but its not anything now. Its just flat with 1/16" insulation. Ive used the heck out of it. Usually over a fleece.
    yeah, it doesn't seem all that light for the warmth, vice versa. there's probably something better out there.

    thanks...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    Keep in mind these UL puff jackets are just layers; they work wonderfully layered with other things, like a wind jacket or other hard shell on top of them. Basically, these UL garments take the place of heavier fleece jackets. My Montbell thermawrap, probably pretty similar to your nano puff is about as warm as a mid-weight fleece, at half the weight or less.

    I wear my MB thermawrap a lot, had it for 7-8 years, probably my favorite go-to mildly insulating layer.
    +1 on the need for some type of wind protection.

  9. #9
    CDT - 2013, PCT - 2009, AT - 1300 miles done burger's Avatar
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    It's not a super-warm jacket, but for the weight it's great. I'd say the Nanopuff is comfortable down to the upper 40s for me. I usually wear my windshirt under it (typically camp routine is: wear hiking shirt alone a bit to dry it; add windshirt when it gets a little cooler; Nanopuff goes on when it gets much cooler), so wind isn't an issue. Sometimes I'll wear my rain jacket over the nanopuff in camp for a tiny bit of extra warmth.

    Really, though, you need to think about what ultralight insulated jackets are for. This is not a jacket meant to be worn while spending hours sitting around camp in freezing weather. This is a jacket best suited to wearing for a short time between stopping hiking and going to sleep. I usually hike til dark, put on my Nanopuff while you're cooking and setting up camp, and go to sleep. So, I'm rarely wearing it in the coldest temperatures. If you are the sort who likes to spend hours sitting around camp, you'll probably want something warmer.

    BTW, if you go with the Nanopuff, get the pullover, not the jacket. If it's warm enough that you're wearing the jacket unzipped, you probably don't need the jacket. You'll save a couple of ounces this way.

    PS The Nanopuff is also great for sleeping in when you are pushing your sleeping bag's tempature limit.

  10. #10
    Registered User The Cleaner's Avatar
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    I've got the Nano Puff pullover.Only weighs 9 ounces.I'm warm with only a lightweight merino baselayer down to around 25* at camp if there is no wind.If it's windy I can put on my Marmot Tempo soft shell hooded jacket or my rain jacket.In my Tarptent Moment DW the Nano Puff and baselayer alone are quite warm down to the low 20s.IMO the hooded version may even be warmer.Although anything Patagonia makes is pricey, I got mine from Ebay NWT for less than $100.I'm not a big fan of anything down,it is pricey and I like to have campfires and they don't mix well.Layering with any combination is the key to staying warm.Also someone from Florida might be cold no matter what they're wearing if they're not use to cold mountain weather.
    Sleep on the ground, rise with the sun and hike with the wind....

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  12. #12
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    Not $100. Warm

    cheyou

  13. #13

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    It's Patagroinia warm.

    Patagroinia ... never heard of them?

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    Keep in mind these UL puff jackets are just layers; they work wonderfully layered with other things, like a wind jacket or other hard shell on top of them. Basically, these UL garments take the place of heavier fleece jackets. My Montbell thermawrap, probably pretty similar to your nano puff is about as warm as a mid-weight fleece, at half the weight or less.

    I wear my MB thermawrap a lot, had it for 7-8 years, probably my favorite go-to mildly insulating layer.
    yeah I see that. but just the jacket without hood weighs 12oz. I was expecting something either a little warmer or lighter. or both...

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    It's Patagroinia warm.

    Patagroinia ... never heard of them?
    you never heard of Patagroinia?!!



    sheesh. how about Dick Hertz?..


  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Secondmouse View Post
    yeah I see that. but just the jacket without hood weighs 12oz. I was expecting something either a little warmer or lighter. or both...
    Yeah, but that was exactly what ColoradoRob was getting at...you could get warmer through layering with other pieces and accessories rather than seeing a Patagroinia Nano Nano Poof Poof as a stand alone piece which doesn't happen in the real world anyway.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Cleaner View Post
    I've got the Nano Puff pullover.Only weighs 9 ounces.I'm warm with only a lightweight merino baselayer down to around 25* at camp if there is no wind.If it's windy I can put on my Marmot Tempo soft shell hooded jacket or my rain jacket.In my Tarptent Moment DW the Nano Puff and baselayer alone are quite warm down to the low 20s.IMO the hooded version may even be warmer.Although anything Patagonia makes is pricey, I got mine from Ebay NWT for less than $100.I'm not a big fan of anything down,it is pricey and I like to have campfires and they don't mix well.Layering with any combination is the key to staying warm.Also someone from Florida might be cold no matter what they're wearing if they're not use to cold mountain weather.
    okay, obviously a 9oz Primaloft jacket over merino baselayer at 25* means you're not just warmer than I am, you're a different species. I don't think I would be warm with a 9oz Down garment in those conditions unless I was mildly active.

    but anyway, a full zipper nano puff jacket is 12oz in my size. I have a down jacket about that weight, that has to be significantly warmer. still not seeing how they fit into my scheme of things...

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Yeah, but that was exactly what ColoradoRob was getting at...you could get warmer through layering with other pieces and accessories rather than seeing a Patagroinia Nano Nano Poof Poof as a stand alone piece which doesn't happen in the real world anyway.
    oh yeah, I understood that. but is it supposed to be a top layer or insulation under a shell?

    they pitch it as a top layer with the windproof and DWR but reviews show it to be not very good with the myriad sewn-through seams. you definitely need a shell in any kind of precip...

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Secondmouse View Post
    oh yeah, I understood that. but is it supposed to be a top layer or insulation under a shell?

    they pitch it as a top layer with the windproof and DWR but reviews show it to be not very good with the myriad sewn-through seams. you definitely need a shell in any kind of precip...
    Can be both a top or mid layer.

    You'll(we'll) go around in endless circles until you narrow down your warmth and ??? priorities.(wt, water resistance, synthetic or down, cost, versatility, etc)

    It's hard to begin with quantifying warmth when making puffy comparisons. So much subjectivity.

  20. #20

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    I've always seen the puff jackets as a marketing gimmick. I mean, why bothering carry something too thin to be a real jacket when you could just go ahead and get a real down jacket and stay warmer? The puffy jacket shell is the same fabric amount as in a down jacket, so you're carrying the weight of that shell. But inside the puffy shell is minimal insulation at best. Carry the same weight shell and load it with more down insulation (or whatever) and you have a warmer jacket.

    Many puffy jackets are down-filled and are used as midlayers for actual backpacking. I prefer to save my down tops for camp and use my capilene tops for movement. And my down jackets will never be puffies with their gram-counted goose down. I want a winter down jacket with enough real down to keep me warm. My down parka has 15 ozs of down, my Meltdown jacket has 7 ozs of down. Anything less inside doesn't interest me. It ends up becoming more a garment shell than an insulating shell.

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