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  1. #1
    Registered User Slacks's Avatar
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    Default Waterproofing a Rain Jacket

    Hey folks, been a while since I posted anything. Tried to search for this topic but didn't find much on rain jackets.

    Planning a long road trip with several 3-5 day hikes and plan on bringing my 3 year old Marmot Precip jacket. Has served me well and is still in good condition though starting to repel water noticeably less. Would like to save some bucks on a new rain jacket and just re-proof my Precip. It appears my options are spraying or running it through the washer with a special product.

    Any experience with either or general advice on the subject? Thanks!
    the dude abides

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    Just buy the Nikwax product(s) and follow their directions.
    "It goes to show you never can tell." - Charles Edward Anderson Berry

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    before reapplying the DWR check the interior for any damage to membrane such as delamination. I've seen it happen several times with the Precip after periods of inactivity. Applying DWR to such a WP shell piece is not going to get you back to a functioning WP shell.

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    First of all, wash it. That alone may restore most of the water proofness, as dirt and grime allow water to "stick" and soak in, instead of running off.

    If washing alone isn't enough, indeed also spray it with Nikwax or some similar product.
    ye shall not pollute the land wherein ye are: ... Defile not therefore the land which ye shall inhabit..... Numbers 35

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  5. #5
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rain Man View Post
    First of all, wash it. That alone may restore most of the water proofness, as dirt and grime allow water to "stick" and soak in, instead of running off.

    If washing alone isn't enough, indeed also spray it with Nikwax or some similar product.
    Beat me to it, but yeah, gentle wash. I use nikwax tech wash. then dry it gently (low heat), not all the way dry, then spray on the nik wax DWR stuff all over, but fairly generously on the wet-areas, like shoulders. Then, dry again, this time completely. I find it works better to use actual dryer than letting air dry.

    Water will bead right up again! Like new. I do this at least once a year to all my jackets with a DWR coating (most of them).

    Another benefit of a fresh DWR coating is that the jacket will actually breathe better in a lot of situations. Keeps the inside drier.

  6. #6
    Registered User Slacks's Avatar
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    Great tips! It hasn't seen much inactivity since I bought it, but I will be sure to double check the insides. And I'll wash it this weekend and see how that goes.
    the dude abides

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Grouse View Post
    Just buy the Nikwax product(s) and follow their directions.
    +1


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    Yup, wash it first, preferably hand wash, especially with older pieces, or on GENTLE CYCLE IN FRONT LOADING WASHER. I prefer McNetts Pro Cleaner. https://www.mcnett.com/gearaid/blog/...ts-and-fabrics Nikwax Tech Wash is very good too.http://www.ems.com/nikwax-tech-wash-...FQsQgQodNCAAiA

    Follow up with a DWR. I prefer McNetts Revivex SPRAY ON for WP shells. IMO, tumbling shells in a washer first to clean and then separately to apply a wash in DWR isn't always kind to gear possibly more so with older gear even if using a front loading washer which you should always use for washing gear. https://www.mcnett.com/gearaid/durab...proofing#36221


    Alternatively Nikwax offers the combined packaging of both the Tech Wash and TX Direct Wash In http://www.nikwax-usa.com/en-us/prod...-1&fabricid=-1

  9. #9
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
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    Frankly, before spending any $ on Nikwax, I'd spend $20 for a new set of Frogg Toggs at WalMart. That will keep you a whole lot drier than the Precip.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deadeye View Post
    Frankly, before spending any $ on Nikwax, I'd spend $20 for a new set of Frogg Toggs at WalMart. That will keep you a whole lot drier than the Precip.
    I agree with the above, my Precip is a pretty good wind breaker but has never kept me dry.
    "The difficult can be done immediately, the impossible takes a little longer"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Storm View Post
    I agree with the above, my Precip is a pretty good wind breaker but has never kept me dry.
    That seems equivalent to an automobile always getting one to intended destination ignoring the behavior of who's operating the vehicle. You obviously haven't seen my sister uh hem drive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Storm View Post
    I agree with the above, my Precip is a pretty good wind breaker but has never kept me dry.
    DITTO. A really expensive windbreaker.
    ye shall not pollute the land wherein ye are: ... Defile not therefore the land which ye shall inhabit..... Numbers 35

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    I don't count on rain gear keeping me dry. It is to keep me WARM, not necessarily dry. There is no rain gear made that will keep you dry in multiple days of hiking in rain. Some will keep you drier longer or be lighter but they all fail to keep you dry so get past that idea.

    I used to think of rain gear in terms of keeping me dry and having the best "breathable" fabric. To be honest... none of them are all that breathable. The value of breathable is that you can dry clothing under them in camp at the expense of your body temp (you are the dryer).

    These days I have a wind breaker that is light weight and much more breathable than any rain gear that I use 95% of the time in the rain. If it is warm and raining I don't bother because my skin is waterproof. I don't care about being dry.. I care about being and staying warm. I carry rain gear but I mostly use it in camp. I'm thinking of experimenting with a Tyvek homemade kilt as my next rain gear. I've never worn rain pants while hiking but I have worn them in camp in the cold seasons.

  14. #14
    Registered User Slacks's Avatar
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    It is amazing how quickly this turned from productive on topic suggestions to irrelevant opinions on different gear options.

    Obviously I know the Precip is not perfect.
    the dude abides

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slacks View Post
    It is amazing how quickly this turned from productive on topic suggestions to irrelevant opinions on different gear options.

    Obviously I know the Precip is not perfect.
    If you will email me through my website and include Slacks in your email, I will sell you the Packa of your choice for 50% off + shipping.
    Cedar Tree

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slacks View Post
    It is amazing how quickly this turned from productive on topic suggestions to irrelevant opinions on different gear options.

    Obviously I know the Precip is not perfect.
    I own a Precip - I thought a different option was the most productive suggestion I could make.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kevperro View Post
    I don't count on rain gear keeping me dry. It is to keep me WARM, not necessarily dry. There is no rain gear made that will keep you dry in multiple days of hiking in rain. Some will keep you drier longer or be lighter but they all fail to keep you dry so get past that idea.

    I used to think of rain gear in terms of keeping me dry and having the best "breathable" fabric. To be honest... none of them are all that breathable. The value of breathable is that you can dry clothing under them in camp at the expense of your body temp (you are the dryer).

    These days I have a wind breaker that is light weight and much more breathable than any rain gear that I use 95% of the time in the rain. If it is warm and raining I don't bother because my skin is waterproof. I don't care about being dry.. I care about being and staying warm. I carry rain gear but I mostly use it in camp. I'm thinking of experimenting with a Tyvek homemade kilt as my next rain gear. I've never worn rain pants while hiking but I have worn them in camp in the cold seasons.
    Rain gear might be viewed as just another tool that contributes to achieving a goal perhaps better perceived as a component in attaining a goal rather than an absolute means to an absolute end goal. Shell fabric of a rain or wind jacket is also another component only part of the breathability and comfortability equation. Perhaps, far more important to breathability and comfortably is the efficient and effective use of venting options which relies on the user! Gear does not operate effectively and optimally when ignoring user behavior!

    It's amazing and alarming how often humanity ignores personal behavior in outcome.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slacks View Post
    It is amazing how quickly this turned from productive on topic suggestions to irrelevant opinions on different gear options.

    Obviously I know the Precip is not perfect.
    It ain't a bad jacket at all, really, I owned and used one for years. Sure, better options these days, but a good re-DWR coating on your precip will give you fine service.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Rain gear might be viewed as just another tool that contributes to achieving a goal perhaps better perceived as a component in attaining a goal rather than an absolute means to an absolute end goal. Shell fabric of a rain or wind jacket is also another component only part of the breathability and comfortability equation. Perhaps, far more important to breathability and comfortably is the efficient and effective use of venting options which relies on the user! Gear does not operate effectively and optimally when ignoring user behavior!

    It's amazing and alarming how often humanity ignores personal behavior in outcome.
    For sure.... I hike routinely in the perpetually wet PNW. I did the Wonderland a couple years ago and it rained for 4-5 days strait (not hard) and I cannot tell you how many people had everything they owned wet. This kind of perplexed me as virtually everything I owned was dry. My boots/shoes were wet... my shorts and t-shirt and my shell was. Talking to a couple young guys they had worn their layers, thinking they needed them to stay warm under their rain gear. All of it was wet... all of their clothing. It wasn't dangerous temps so it was just unpleasant for them but it really goes to show you how little people actually understand about their clothing system. They virtually always wear too much while moving. You see them tromping down the trail wrapped in Gortex and layered up when it is a perfect 40 degrees F. and shorts and t-shirt are perfectly sufficient. People do not appreciate keeping clothing dry for camp nor how dangerous it can be if weather gets genuinely cold when everything you own is wet. It doesn't matter how much you spend on technical wear when you don't know how to manage it.

  20. #20
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    Thank you. Thank You.

    Terms like layering are thrown around so much many folks see it as a passe topic, no new news there, and not worth considering in greater depth and applicability. Routinely, I observe those zipped up tight in their rain wear all vents closed, hood up and adjustable chin cord cinched down, adjustable wrist cuffs as tight as can be, hand pockets zipped closed, waist hem cinched tight, often wearing a rain jacket too heavy or inappropriate of a choice for the conditions in the first place, wearing rather unnecessary heavy wt rain pants, too heavy a layer or layers under neath, often themselves with chest zips zipped up....all when it's not even raining heavily and they're hiking lot a run away freight train oblivious to proactively thermoregulating to avoid and minimize pre heat build up. Then, the apparel like a rain jacket is ignorantly blamed and comments fly like "this jacket doesn't breathe for crap", "what marketing hype", "all rain wear sucks", "this jacket makes me wetter inside from trapping more moisture than repelling wetness from rain", and rain wear is implied to be the sole cause for heating up beyond comfortability.

    This scenario is all too commonly caused by hubris and a pretentious attitude that presupposes an over exaggerated level of knowledge.

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