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  1. #241
    ME => GA 19AT3 rickb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    No, you don't need trekking poles.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
    Soinds like a compromise is needed to resolve the conflict:

    Take a just one.

  2. #242

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    I wouldn't say you really need them, it's a very personal choice, and many people finished thu-hikes without them but there are situations they come in extremely handy. I hardly ever carry them on day hikes or weekend trips but I loved them on PCT for water crossings and they definitely helped my knees during long descents.
    My book I Had a Dream, I Lived It is now available on Amazon. 1% of all 2018 sales will go to Pacific Crest Trail Association. http://goo.gl/pLfXMO Happy Trails!

  3. #243
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    I never had used them prior to my AT thru-hike last year. They saved my ass too many times to count. In addition to stability they helped with pace, and lessened the strain on my knees on downhills. I think a day hike with a small pack would be a different story. I am walking the camino is Spain this year with a pack weight of 15#'s. I doubt I will bring the poles.

    I heard arguments for with and without last year on the trail. It boils down to preference and whether you have a tent that requires poles to set it up.

  4. #244

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    I need them. I have no idea if you need them.
    "No Worries" 2015 GA-ME; 2016 LT End-to-End

  5. #245

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    Dont need them
    Or a pack

    Or shoes for that matter.

    But some items make things easier

  6. #246
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    Dont need them
    Or a pack

    Or shoes for that matter.

    But some items make things easier
    what is really "needed" to hike

    about the same as to live
    so oxygen, water and nutrition - everything else is optional

    also, kinda short season without clothing/ shelter

  7. #247
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Hiking smarter, with conscientious ergonomic and energy efficient movement, taking care in foot placements, having a greater self awareness, lightening the load, protecting oneself with a whole body/holistic outlook, and adopting lifestyles and diet that support and promote whole body health, all reduce physical/emotional stress and risks of falls. This should be the primary goal. If that breaks down or has been ignored trekking poles can help. If one wants to trekking poles can help facilitate many potential positives but they are not essential for everyone or all the time.

    Still using my 6-ft. bamboo pole. Great for downhill. I only have to release my grip then tighten it again to "automatically" make it longer for downhills. I think this beats the devil out of trekking poles. Also it was once very useful when used as a "bayonet" (and my Quantico Marine corps training) to repeal a very aggressive black bear on the trail to the Chimeys in the GSMNP.
    I wouldn't have wanted to have only trekking poles for this encounter. Also useful for once throwing a timber rattler off the trail. Six feet sometimes exponentially better than a 4-ft. pole.

  8. #248
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    I need them! They have saved me from many rolled ankles, falls, stumbles... Plus, they have assisted with climbs when I was exhausted! I would not hike without them!

  9. #249
    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
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    No I would say they are not needed, but I still will not hike without mine for every reason previously mention. It is and individual choice. If you don't want to spring for the more costly poles, check a wally world for a pair. I would suggest flick locks over twist locks.
    Blackheart

  10. #250
    Registered User Shooting Star's Avatar
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    When I was younger and backpacked without trekking poles (they weren't common in the 80's), I took a
    fall about every trip and was always lucky to not get hurt. As an old guy hiking with poles, I've only fallen
    once. I shorten them for climbs and use my upper body more for going up steep trail sections. For long
    downhills, I lengthen them and notice that they help a lot with knee wear and tear. And if I am in really
    rocky sections of trail, I collapse and stow them in the pack. With trekking poles, you're more like a 4 legged
    critter than a 2 legged one. But everyone has to choose what works for them...

  11. #251
    Registered User TMathers's Avatar
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    At my age and with my knees ill take all the help i can get

  12. #252

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    Quote Originally Posted by TMathers View Post
    At my age and with my knees ill take all the help i can get
    Also good for:

    Checking tall grass for rattlesnakes
    removing spider webs
    tent poles on a Zpacks tent
    taking the weight of your arms off your legs and feet
    poking in the direction of aggressive dogs
    Rapidly removing body weight from an ankle that just rolled over and avoiding injury
    Generating noise to scare off a bear

  13. #253
    Registered User MikekiM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by freegoldrush View Post
    also good for:

    Checking tall grass for rattlesnakes
    removing spider webs
    tent poles on a zpacks tent
    taking the weight of your arms off your legs and feet
    poking in the direction of aggressive dogs
    rapidly removing body weight from an ankle that just rolled over and avoiding injury
    generating noise to scare off a bear

    ^^^ this ^^^
    _______________________________________
    The difficulty of finding any given trail marker is directly proportional to the importance of the consequences of failing to find it.

  14. #254

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    I also use a single pole, in my case a trekking pole. I have arthritis in my hands and alternate between them as they get sore.

  15. #255
    Registered User Redbird2's Avatar
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    My trekking poles are part of my must-have pieces of equipment. I use them for tent setup. When hiking up and down mountains they really take some of the pressure off your knees. I find them essential for balance when the terrain is tricky like stream crossings. I use them for getting a steady rhythm on flat trails.

  16. #256
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScareBear View Post
    They are useful under a number of scenarios.

    They are especially useful the older you are.

    Almost all ultra-light tents utilize them.

    I use them mostly on the uphill until it gets too steep. I use them mostly on the downhill to telegraph a foot plant, much like mogul skiing. I use them on the flats to sweep away cobwebs in the green tunnel and poison ivy stands on the edge of the trail. I use them to part giant milkweeds and thornbushes in front of me.

    Mine weigh 7oz. each. and i don't count them in my pack weight....
    Yes. What he said.


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