Page 6 of 13 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 120 of 256
  1. #101
    Clueless Weekender
    Join Date
    04-10-2011
    Location
    Niskayuna, New York
    Age
    63
    Posts
    3,863
    Journal Entries
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    I've seen more people take falls during water crossings attempting to rock hop on slippery rock or balance beam across on logs to avoid taking off their shoes or getting their feet/shoes wet. Makes me scratch my head especially when the crossings are shallow, narrow, very cold conditions don't exist, and the person already is wearing sandals or has wet feet/shoes.
    I'm afraid that I keep making the mistake of trying to rock hop - right up until the first slip of the day. (After that, my feet aren't going to get any wetter.) The thing is, most of my hiking partners have better balance than I do, so I'm always the one with wet feet.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  2. #102
    Wanna-be hiker trash
    Join Date
    03-05-2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Age
    38
    Posts
    6,865
    Images
    78

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Another Kevin View Post
    I'm afraid that I keep making the mistake of trying to rock hop - right up until the first slip of the day. (After that, my feet aren't going to get any wetter.) The thing is, most of my hiking partners have better balance than I do, so I'm always the one with wet feet.
    Sorry about leading you on that wild goose chase
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  3. #103
    Clueless Weekender
    Join Date
    04-10-2011
    Location
    Niskayuna, New York
    Age
    63
    Posts
    3,863
    Journal Entries
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pilgrimskywheel View Post
    Yup. Ice ax is a good choice. To each his own. I prefer not taking the bad step/slip/fall first, it likely means I won't need the ax to arrest. This baby is great for glacining (sp?) (sliding down ice faces bordered by huge rocky pits) - which as you know is a BIG part of the PCT show. Clearly however you're not going up into the Sierras with a GoPro in one hand and a Snicker Bar in the other because you're soooooo fashion forward. Lets keep it real dog!
    I'm just waiting for there to be enough ice down here in the valley that I can get in some practice arrests at the gorge in the local nature preserve, where I know the runout is safe. It's a skill that I have never used in earnest, and hope never to use, but sooner or later I might make a mistake, after which it could make the difference between being very frightened and very dead.

    I don't glissade without a piolet. I could see the length of that pole/pick/alpenstock thingy being useful for a standing or crouching glissade - but I more often glissade seated. I would need to work on balance more to avoid wiping out from the other positions.

    I know nothing about the "PCT show." The farthest west I've ever hiked is Arizona, and I moved away from there in the early 1980s. I'm a Northeast hiker and use the winter gear in places like the Catskills and Adirondacks. I don't own a GoPro, and GoPro video tends to make me a bit seasick. Even though I know Snickers bars are supposed to be the coin of the realm among hikers, I don't care for them all that much. I've never been "fashion forward" except by accident. Even among my geek circles, I'm geeky.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  4. #104
    Clueless Weekender
    Join Date
    04-10-2011
    Location
    Niskayuna, New York
    Age
    63
    Posts
    3,863
    Journal Entries
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarcasm the elf View Post
    Sorry about leading you on that wild goose chase
    You weren't even on the trip I had in mind! I made it up to about the last fifteen feet of this river before going 'ploosh' in front of nine dryshod hikers. That was at record low water, by the way. In typical conditions, that crossing is knee-deep and we'd all simply have gotten wet. It's a very dangerous ford at some times of year, and there is a suspension bridge planned. The trees for the towers are lying in that gap on the far bank, waiting for the wood to season.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  5. #105
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    17,776

    Default

    Yup, it's unequivocally a valid proposition that IF more folks proactively considered health of the body by not contributing to it's demise through debilitating behavior and decisions fewer people would need trekking poles. If more people give greater consciousness to better more efficient stable energy efficient mechanics t5here would be fewer using trekking poles.

    It has nothing to with being cool It's about having the willingness to question assumptions, making better decisions, and having a greater awareness.

  6. #106
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-10-2005
    Location
    Bedford, MA
    Posts
    12,678

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Yup, it's unequivocally a valid proposition that IF more folks proactively considered health of the body by not contributing to it's demise through debilitating behavior and decisions fewer people would need trekking poles. If more people give greater consciousness to better more efficient stable energy efficient mechanics t5here would be fewer using trekking poles.

    It has nothing to with being cool It's about having the willingness to question assumptions, making better decisions, and having a greater awareness.
    Shorter: you're all doing it wrong.

  7. #107

    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,869
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    My son when 11:

    Flowing water over knees
    See how low right hand is compare to left?
    Next step is a ft deeper

    Poles needed

    This is a shallow crossing

    Others are thigh to waist deep

    Good luck w/o poles in flowing water
    547398_408109119217749_1063788296_n.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 11-29-2016 at 16:38.

  8. #108
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-28-2015
    Location
    Bad Ischl, Austria
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,134

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pilgrimskywheel View Post
    Irresponsible and potentially dangerous poppycock
    Suppose you completely misinterpreted my post.

    First, I was explaining how we in Europe understand the topic of (hiking) poles, and this clearly became a fashion here.
    (that still leaves everybody free to do as he/she likes).

    Second, maybe I put the one thing wrong that every pole here has a quick/emergency release. I have this feature on several (older) poles here, but didn't find it mentioned in the most recent ads. So either this feature is no longer present, or its no longer advertised.

  9. #109
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    17,776

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rafe View Post
    Shorter: you're all doing it wrong.
    That's all you got out of it?

    Condensed: many paths to the same ends.

    Not everyone who needs trekking poles would need trekking poles if they consider a different path can get them to the same place trekking poles can!

    Is that too complicated a sound bite to grasp?

  10. #110

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Yup, it's unequivocally a valid proposition that IF more folks proactively considered health of the body by not contributing to it's demise through debilitating behavior and decisions fewer people would need trekking poles. If more people give greater consciousness to better more efficient stable energy efficient mechanics t5here would be fewer using trekking poles.

    It has nothing to with being cool It's about having the willingness to question assumptions, making better decisions, and having a greater awareness.
    If only life were so simple that mere awareness would solve all of our issues. In my life, decisions were made, some of them benefited me emotionally and socially, but hurt me physically. I rowed crew in the 80s, I loved it, I pushed my body past healthy limits at times. My knees suffered for it, my long term balance suffered for it. That said, I don't regret a second of it.

    I find it a bit insulting that you chalk up hiking pole use to unawareness, bad decisions and an inability to question assumptions. As I get older, I lose more and more balance each year, prior injuries take a toll. There's only so much healthy living, eating and exercise I can do that mitigates the aging process even a little.

  11. #111

    Default

    More balderdash and conjecture. Ever heard of bear bells? Stop just making stuff up.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Some of the loudest hikers I here, other than my sister incessantly talking to my nieces and nephews on trail, are hikers using trekking poles. I can usually hear them from a mile or more away clickkety clacking and scuffing their way down the trail. This noise has frightened more wildlife off or put them into an unnatural state of alarm perhaps more than perhaps any other UNNATURAL sound in Nature while. Many people hike in nature to experience Nature. I know I do. When wildlife is scared off because of unnatural repetitive noise like trekking pole users make we experience less of Nature. Getting those photo opportunities never materializes because the unnatural noise. So, folks saying they've never lost a shot or imposed on others attempting to get their own photos due to trekking pole use are fooling themselves!

  12. #112

    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,869
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pilgrimskywheel View Post
    More balderdash and conjecture. Ever heard of bear bells? Stop just making stuff up.
    Actually I intentionally clack my poles together periodically in low visibility areas like rhody thickets and at night to avoid surprising a bear. I like to see them. I dont want to bump into them.

  13. #113
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-02-2014
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    1,260

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Yup, it's unequivocally a valid proposition that IF more folks proactively considered health of the body by not contributing to it's demise through debilitating behavior and decisions fewer people would need trekking poles. If more people give greater consciousness to better more efficient stable energy efficient mechanics t5here would be fewer using trekking poles.

    It has nothing to with being cool It's about having the willingness to question assumptions, making better decisions, and having a greater awareness.
    You are making some dangerous assumptions to reach your unequivocally valid proposition. First, you assume that those who have abused their bodies (with bad things like sugar, booze, cigs, etc...) are going to go hiking at some point. And that their bodies have suffered so much from the abuse that poles are needed. That initial assumption is invalid on its face and makes the remainder of your unequivocally valid proposition...invalid. Second, you completely discount the aging process. Third, you completely discount disease processes. Fourth, you discount congenital conditions and deformities. Finally, you attribute the "need" for poles to a lack of "better more efficient stable energy efficient mechanics". What the fook does THAT even mean? That somebody who needs poles won't need them if they somehow develop "better more efficient stable energy efficient mechanics"? Could it be that the somebody that needs the poles is not capable of developing this mystical energy efficient mechanics? That's the entire problem with your "theory". Its based solely upon your personal bias and doesn't factor in any alternative basis for needing poles. Your theory is both equivocal and invalid. If we all took better care of ourselves DOES not obviate the necessity of hiking poles and to preach otherwise is silly. Logically speaking its silly. Foolish and silly. Sorry. Your bias so completely taints your theory that it is funny....
    You are making

  14. #114
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    17,776

    Default

    YES, if more people were more aware less people would NEED trekking poles.

    No where was it implied that a greater awareness results in everyone not ever needing or wanting trekking poles.

    Easily could be deemed insulting or offensive that you failed to see that. One equally can choose to not be insulted. Not intending to insult. I feel sorry for you that you took it that way.

    No need to get into a polarizing debate. I'm attempting to add to the breadth of awareness and considerations not demonizing trekking poles as my used trekking poles and purchases surely attest.

  15. #115
    •Completed A.T. Section Hike GA to ME 1996 thru 2003 •Donating Member Skyline's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-08-2003
    Location
    Luray, Virginia
    Posts
    4,826
    Images
    3

    Default

    If I could use them in a mall or airport without arousing the ire of Security, I would. ADDICTED!

  16. #116

    Default

    Lots of folks don't wear seat belts, or helmets, or condoms, earplugs, goggles, or fire retardant clothes. Some folks don't hang their food. Come unprepared to the back country and die. Try and help the unprepared and die too. Simple. Leave a $20 dollar tool indispensable to everyone else at home because of hubris and die. Check the stats. Have no idea what you're talking about and send someone else to their death and live with it. Quit fooling around! This isn't virtual reality, you don't win points for getting someone else to follow your misguided, inexperienced, and fool hardy ways. This isn't a contest of international "interpretation". I don't care where you are. GO TO THE BACK COUNTRY UNPREPARED AND DIE. There's a missing kid with a family desperate to know his fate at this very moment. Posted on this site. He marched into a hostile environment without what was required and very probably paid the ultimate price. No poles, not enough cold weather gear. And no disrespect to him or his grieving family. God bless them. God bless the hundreds of searchers risking their lives NOW to bring that lost boy's body home. Forgive me too. It is a hard thing to tell the truth. We must learn from it though or be lost also. If you go to the back country, the wilderness, the frontier, unprepared you will perish. The list is long, and sadly soon forgot. "Ecotourism is inherently dangerous. We assume these risks individually...

  17. #117
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    17,776

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ScareBear View Post
    That's the entire problem with your "theory". It doesn't factor in any alternative basis for needing poles. Your theory is both equivocal and invalid...
    Hmm, Really? Sounding logical and rational through choice of phrases and speech while choosing to disregard significant clearly communicated information that offers context isn't ultimately all that rational.

    You could only come that conclusion if you conveniently ignore parts of my posts.

    You missed this information:

    Trekking poles are not essential for everyone.

    Not pro or anti trekking pole use just saying you might want to consider the objectives often promoting store bought trekking poles can be accomplished in other ways without relying on gear or buying something.

    While I've seen people stabilize their balance often with trekking poles while fording, crossing snowfields, and on descents...

    ...there's a lot of potential upside to trekking pole use...

    Sure, trekking poles can help slow a hiker down descending but can't that also be accomplished by simply mindfully slowing down on descents period? Seems good mindful hiking practice to slow down and avoid high impact body jarring movement and giving greater heed to conscientious stable movement regardless if trekking poles are being used.

    Hiking smarter, with conscientious ergonomic and energy efficient movement, taking care in foot placements, having a greater self awareness, lightening the load, protecting oneself with a whole body/holistic outlook, and adopting lifestyles and diet that support and promote whole body health, all reduce physical/emotional stress and risks of falls. This should be the primary goal. If that breaks down or has been ignored trekking poles can help. If one wants to trekking poles can help facilitate many potential positives but they are not essential for everyone or all the time.

    ...

  18. #118

    Default

    Yes please. There's lots of folks who should leave their poles on the van they rode in on.

  19. #119
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-29-2016
    Location
    Vass, NC
    Age
    48
    Posts
    8

    Default Another Use for Me

    I too have used poles for many years. Besides all of the other points already mentioned, I find that I use them as entertainment while I am walking. In fact, I become OCD about them after a while ( like Sheldon knock on the door three times OCD). If I have to step over a log, I have to tap both pole tips on the log before I step over it (also good to check for snakes on the other side of the log if needed).

    Once you learn to use them, they can really disperse the energy of the uphills and downhills to your arms, back, and shoulders to help save your legs and knees. I feel they also keep the blood moving in my as and hands, preventing some of the inevitable swelling from walking with a ruck.

    Try them, I bet you will keep using them.

  20. #120

    Default

    I knew this guy Darwin...

Page 6 of 13 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •