Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Registered User EO.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    06-16-2016
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Age
    28
    Posts
    46

    Default Footwear on the AT

    I've read that trail runners dominate the AT. Are there certain sections where sturdier hiking shoes would be beneficial?

    For the thru hikers - did you wear one type of shoe (boots, shoes, trail runners) on the entire trail or did you switch?

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-27-2015
    Location
    Parkersburg, WV
    Age
    47
    Posts
    518

    Default

    Trail runners or lightweight hikers (mostly mid or low). Not too many folks out there in boots these days from what I have seen. Some like a harder sole in the rocky sections, like PA. I do fine in my Lone Peaks. I hike with poles; they save my feet and joints a lot of impact as the miles roll by.

  3. #3

    Default

    Sometimes it's a progression with people. If you've hiked a bunch and/or your ankles are strong enough for the task, trail runners could be a good choice
    If you're going NOBO, the most rugged and rocky terrain is far away... so you could start with trail runners and see how it goes. Not all runners are created equal, and you can get something with a reasonably thick sole for rocks, etc.

    Shoes like merrell moab low cut are also common and are a bit heavier but a good hiking option

    If you're starting the trail early, trail runners aren't good in slush/snow/cold, etc, and you would either want something else or use other strategies to make the trail runners workable until it warms up

  4. #4
    Registered User Engine's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-29-2009
    Location
    Citrus Springs, FL
    Age
    55
    Posts
    1,673
    Images
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hikingjim View Post
    Sometimes it's a progression with people. If you've hiked a bunch and/or your ankles are strong enough for the task, trail runners could be a good choice
    If you're going NOBO, the most rugged and rocky terrain is far away... so you could start with trail runners and see how it goes. Not all runners are created equal, and you can get something with a reasonably thick sole for rocks, etc.

    Shoes like merrell moab low cut are also common and are a bit heavier but a good hiking option

    If you're starting the trail early, trail runners aren't good in slush/snow/cold, etc, and you would either want something else or use other strategies to make the trail runners workable until it warms up
    My wife and I are runners and we enjoy trail runs regularly, so it would seem like a no brainer for us to use trail runners when hiking. Strange as it is, neither one of us seems to be able to find a pair that is as comfortable for walking in as they are when we are running. We both ended up with Merrell light hiking shoes and our feet are much happier. The extra 1-2 ounces per shoe are worth it, but if I ever found a pair of trail runners that worked I wouldn't hesitate to switch.
    “He is richest who is content with the least, for content is the wealth of nature.” –Socrates

  5. #5
    Registered User Sidetrail's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-10-2016
    Location
    Orchard Park, NY
    Age
    62
    Posts
    11
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    I am going to start with La Sportiva Wildcat 2.0 GTX trail runners that have a gore-tex waterproof liner to keep my feet dry in the cooler April weather then, switch to La Sportiva Wildcats that are not waterproof. They are both very light and I got them on sale so they were not too expensive.

  6. #6
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-20-2013
    Location
    Upper East Side of Texas
    Age
    74
    Posts
    8,401

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sidetrail View Post
    I am going to start with La Sportiva Wildcat 2.0 GTX trail runners that have a gore-tex waterproof liner to keep my feet dry in the cooler April weather then, switch to La Sportiva Wildcats that are not waterproof. They are both very light and I got them on sale so they were not too expensive.
    I have the NO Gore-Tex Ultra Raptors. Gore-Tex doesn't do a very good job of keeping my feet dry in ankle deep wet mud or calf to knee deep stream crossings.
    Wayne


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Eddie Valiant: "That lame-brain freeway idea could only be cooked up by a toon."
    https://wayne-ayearwithbigfootandbubba.blogspot.com
    FlickrMyBookTwitSpaceFace



  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-09-2014
    Location
    Waynesboro, PA
    Age
    55
    Posts
    57

    Default

    Love my salamons. https://www.google.com/aclk?sa=l&ai=...wzwIngI&adurl=


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    Registered User EO.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    06-16-2016
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Age
    28
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rmcpeak View Post
    Some like a harder sole in the rocky sections, like PA.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hikingjim View Post
    If you're going NOBO, the most rugged and rocky terrain is far away... so you could start with trail runners and see how it goes.

    If you're starting the trail early, trail runners aren't good in slush/snow/cold, etc, and you would either want something else or use other strategies to make the trail runners workable until it warms up
    Good points. I figured the rocks in PA might require something a little sturdier. Didn't think about the trail runner issue with an early start. Thanks for your feedback.

  9. #9
    Registered User Christoph's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-18-2015
    Location
    Valdosta, Georgia
    Age
    48
    Posts
    596

    Default

    I started out at the Falls with some light hiking boots I've used for short, day to week long trails. Thought they would be the way to go. Never had so many blisters and foot pain (terrain was a lot harder than I've done). Can't remember where exactly, but I switched to some running sneakers and what a difference it made. of course everyone's different but my feet were so happy after that. I'd imagine on the PA rocks, it might be different though, needing something a bit more sturdy/ankle support.
    - Trail name: Thumper

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-05-2017
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Tx
    Age
    60
    Posts
    65

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Soggybottom View Post
    Love my salamons. https://www.google.com/aclk?sa=l&ai=...wzwIngI&adurl=


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    I have a pair of Salomon's too. I haven't done a lot of rough hiking in them, but i hope to.. these shoes fit perfect and have not given me 2 minutes of discomfort from the day i put them on over a year ago. These are worn daily, so may not last a hike, but i am thinking to get another pair before striking out this spring/summer.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #11

    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,869
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    I wear fairly low minimal insole trail runners.

    After a short while feet become used to rocks and are not affected

    Eventually you value the agility, balance, and trail feel you get from minimal soles. Rocks are not an issue. Theres no going back. Your faster and less likely to turn ankle or such.
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 01-21-2017 at 16:05.

  12. #12

    Default

    Trail runners dominate, but I gravitate towards the heavier runners with more aggressive treads. This excludes about 80% of trail runner shoes.

    Some shoes marketed as "trail running shoes" are almost identical to road running shoes, with slightly less lift and quite smooth treads compared to traditional Vibram sholes for example. Not good.

    If you are heavy and carry a heavy pack, I still think it might be a good idea to have robust hiking boots. In other words, adjust your foundation according to your load. Tiny shoes on a huge load is not a good idea.

  13. #13
    GA-ME Feb. 27th–July 1st, 2016 lwhikerchris's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2015
    Location
    rocksylvania
    Age
    42
    Posts
    114

    Default

    You'll go through about 4 pairs. There's only 2 rules to footwear; make sure they fit and make sure they are comfortable. Everything else is up to you.

    Everything from bare feet, socks, crocks, sandals, all the various sneakers, boots, all the way to steel toed work boots and military boots are on thru hikers' feet. If you like walking in them all day every day, they're fair game.


    It might depend on your starting date what your first pair would be. I started with a mid shoe and switched them for sneakers in Damascus. That being said, I wouldn't thru hike again without a pair of Nike zoom Kiger 3 and Currex sole runpro inserts with darn tough socks; that is a winning combo.

  14. #14
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
    Location
    Golden CO
    Age
    63
    Posts
    5,441
    Images
    2

    Default

    I thru-hiked in one brand of trail runner, April to July, and hardly noticed any rocky areas by the time I got to them. I used a Superfeet insert which stiffened them a bit. I had some deep mud in Vermont in June, and was glad to be wearing a light, washable shoe then.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-06-2016
    Location
    Maryland
    Age
    49
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Danners year round while backpacking. Day hikes with no weight, hiking shoes.

    My Danners are five years old, I have no idea how many miles in them, had them resoled once.

    I like the all leather and water resistance of a boot. My feet don't seem to mind till I forget myself and push too many miles (anything over 20).

    I am am going to try the Zamberlan Vioz though. A little lighter and still leather. More like a boot/sneaker. I don't know what their lifespan will be though.

  16. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,011

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sidetrail View Post
    I am going to start with La Sportive Wild​cat 2.0 GTX trail runners that have a gore-tex waterproof liner to keep my feet dry in the cooler April weather...
    Really? LOL. I couldn't resist.

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •