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  1. #1

    Default At record miles in 24 hour period?

    What is that record?

  2. #2

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    Squeaky hiked 72 miles through the Smokies in 22 hours as part of his 2003 thru hike. Because ultra-marathoners often run over 100 miles in a day I doubt it is a record but extremely impressive for being near the end of a thru hike.

  3. #3

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    I know Horton likes to do his Fun Runs. Are any of them 100 milers?

  4. #4

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    I hiked the whole trail last night, and awoke with nary a blister.

    What do I win?

  5. #5
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    Geez, Mowg, you just scared the bejayzus out of me.......I read your post too fast and for a minute I thought you said you woke up WITH Blister!

    Were that indeed the case, I'm not sure you'd wanna advertise it here!

  6. #6
    tideblazer
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    Default Not faster now than before

    Bob Marshall, in the twenties, hiked a 72 (or was it 74? I can't remember which -don't have that book with me now) day.

    He backpacked with what some have said to be a lifetime 35 mpd average, often walking an extra 5 after dinner to "round out" the day. He routinely did 40's and 50's.

    That was all without a stitch of sil-nylon, gor-tex, trail runners, or can-stove (word was he was a terrible cook, though).

    Instead he used a packboard pack, heavy boots, and was often hauling survey gear that he used for his forestry studies.

    Miles to him were nothing. They were just part of the forest, which he loved immensly, and fought hard to protect from "conservative" resource-gluttons that were hollowing out the forests. He turned a lot of heads with his writings about clear-cuts, often engaging in bitter word battles with those who saw him as a threat to their exploits.

    Furthermore, he covered his miles through real wilderness, usually not on established trails, and pushed the edges of the unexplored areas of Alaska. He wrote passionately about the Indians there, who seemed to be living life just fine while America struggled in the Great Depression. He made thousands of dollars on the book, and split it up between the Indians and their descendents.

    He founded, with Aldo Leopald, the Wilderness Society, and was a major player in inspiring the Wilderness Act that created the areas we now cherish today.

    He was known to favor a stiff drink and comely women. He was from Baltimore, and constanlty noted that a man cannot stay in a city without slowly deteriorating. He has been called a socialist.

    He also was a major player in supporting the construction of Benton Mackaye's dream -the Appalachian Trail.

    Yes, he hiked a lot of miles.

    But they were just the beginning.
    www.ridge2reef.org -Organic Tropical Farm, Farm Stays, Group Retreats.... Trail life in the Caribbean

  7. #7
    ...Or is it Hiker Trash? Almost There's Avatar
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    Excellent post, Wookie!
    Walking Dead Bear
    Formerly the Hiker Known as Almost There

  8. #8
    Peakbagger Extraordinaire The Solemates's Avatar
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    i heard of a guy who did all SNP in 24 hrs on his thru one year. i dont remember his name or if it was legit, but it seemed legit at the time. 99 miles.
    The only thing better than mountains, is mountains where you haven't been.

    amongnature.blogspot.com

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Ender's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lobster
    What is that record?
    I flew to Germany in 7 hours once... does that count? It's something like 3857 miles, or 551 miles an hour. Man, I rock!
    Don't take anything I say seriously... I certainly don't.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Walking w/ a pack or running w/ support?
    As For Bob Marshall I read much of what Wookie posted in a National Geographic years ago. My thoughts in regard to the number of miles he hiked was- how did he know? Seems more of an estimate or guess than fact. I seem to remember that he wasn't a fan of the heavy boots and that most of his walking was w/o a pack. He wasn't bushwacking 40-50mpd either. The artical sounded as if he ended up at home at the end of the day.

  11. #11
    tideblazer
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nean
    Walking w/ a pack or running w/ support?
    As For Bob Marshall I read much of what Wookie posted in a National Geographic years ago. My thoughts in regard to the number of miles he hiked was- how did he know? Seems more of an estimate or guess than fact. I seem to remember that he wasn't a fan of the heavy boots and that most of his walking was w/o a pack. He wasn't bushwacking 40-50mpd either. The artical sounded as if he ended up at home at the end of the day.
    I've wondered the same thing about his mileage.

    Makes me think also today about the mileage, especially on the CDT. How does anyone know these? I'm certain all the routes aren't wheeled.

    They had good ways to estimate mileage. Much of it is the same way we use today -wheels and dead reckoning.

    Marshall was a hellacious backpacker, not just a "fastpacker".

    You should look into some books about him. A very interesting history.
    www.ridge2reef.org -Organic Tropical Farm, Farm Stays, Group Retreats.... Trail life in the Caribbean

  12. #12

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    Makes me think also today about the mileage, especially on the CDT. How does anyone know these?
    It's easy. You hike a section where the CDTS guide estimates 17 miles and write down the 21 miles the CDTA guide gives for the same section!

  13. #13
    tideblazer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sly
    It's easy. You hike a section where the CDTS guide estimates 17 miles and write down the 21 miles the CDTA guide gives for the same section!
    hehhee I bet a lot of that going on
    www.ridge2reef.org -Organic Tropical Farm, Farm Stays, Group Retreats.... Trail life in the Caribbean

  14. #14

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    I lean to believing the Jim Wolf CDTS guides for mileages and accurac,y which for the most part are very detailed.

    The CTDA guides were pretty much dead weight and better left at home.

    Check this out. Caption: "Sly reading a useless book" Notice the busted glasses!

    http://gallery.backcountry.net/album17/abe?full=1
    Last edited by Sly; 01-23-2006 at 13:43.

  15. #15
    Cultural Resource Destroying Speed Hiker
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    Default Pokey in the Smokies

    While the subject is somewhat afoot, does anyone know what the best time for the Smokies is (as a trail run)? I had asked this sometime back on this forum ( http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/show...s+Speed+Record ) but never quite got to the bottom of it. ( I was aiming for about 16-18 hours as a trail run, took a shot at it in April 2004 , but got hammered by T-storms at Newfound Gap 8 hours into it coming from the North)

    I thougt I read that Horton did it in snowy condtions in a pretty good time one year but I was looking for the overall fastest time.

    I know BJ is a big fan of speed events on the AT...Jack?

  16. #16
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    horton does it in january...........for fun! that guy is hard as nails.

    i would shoot for september. i did meet someone who runs it each year with his club and they aim for 14h. i am sure you could go alot faster if you wanted to push hard.

  17. #17
    Cultural Resource Destroying Speed Hiker
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    Default

    Thanks Squeaky,

    Hmmmm....September would be interesting.

    April seemed like a good time as well - the grass was still very short alongside the trail (like in the pic below), avoiding the instant soaked-shoe syndrome that haunted Cave Dog on his Beyond Insanity trip in the region. The temps were also nice and cool. Dang T-storm!

    At least I have an excuse to go back

    BTW - Best of luck on your AT records attempt - I have a feeling if the weather cooperates you will shatter the existing record by a good margin[IMG]images/smilies/clap.gif[/IMG].

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tha Wookie
    Bob Marshall, in the twenties, hiked a 72 (or was it 74? I can't remember which -don't have that book with me now) day.

    He backpacked with what some have said to be a lifetime 35 mpd average, often walking an extra 5 after dinner to "round out" the day. He routinely did 40's and 50's.

    That was all without a stitch of sil-nylon, gor-tex, trail runners, or can-stove (word was he was a terrible cook, though).
    Great post Wook, always important to remember the trailblazers!
    Teej

    "[ATers] represent three percent of our use and about twenty percent of our effort," retired Baxter Park Director Jensen Bissell.

  19. #19

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    I believe the longest 24-hike on the AT is held by either Ed Kostak or Pete Palmer who almost completed Massachusetts (i.e., 89 miles) in just over 24 hours.
    I have never heard of anyone doing the entire AT in SNP in 24 hours.
    Warren Doyle PhD
    34,000-miler (and counting)
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    www.warrendoyle.com

  20. #20
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    30 miles a day is my limit,i prefer 20 to 25 miles a day though neo

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