Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 49

Thread: Cooking.

  1. #21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigcranky View Post
    Nobody is judging your ability. If there happens to be a fire ban it might affect certain kinds of stoves, possibly for hundreds of miles of trail. Me, I'd want to consider that. Here's a link:

    http://www.pcta.org/discover-the-tra...y-basics/fire/
    In my opinion, it seems unlikely that fire bans would cause a problem for you. With all the snow and rain this winter bringing an end to drought conditions, the California fire danger should be lower than it has been in years. Certainly, there is the off chance that the section you are in has a fire ban, due to some anomalous conditions, but that seems fairly unlikely to me. Were this to happen, you would just have to get by on whatever uncooked food and no cook food you have. Shouldn't be a problem.

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-14-2015
    Location
    Texas
    Age
    33
    Posts
    168

    Default

    Yeah i figure i will always bring one precooked meal and get by okay. and if there is a fire ban i would probably know in advance and be able to work around it.

    I have had some experience with wood stoves, not as much as i probably need to but the trail works those things out for me.

    Someone said it wouldnt be a problem finding fuel which is what i would be most concerned about.

  3. #23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wooobie View Post
    Im honestly not sure, i wouldnt say it was volatile i simply couldnt get a flame and heat up meals.. i just dont think it was putting out enough. for most the CT i diddnt have any issues at all, there were a few nights up high that i just couldnt get it going.
    Did you put the alcohol (in its container) in your pocket for a little while before trying to light it? I used an alcohol stove on top of Mt. Elbert at 14,000+ without much of a problem. I just had to warm the alcohol with my body heat before lighting. At higher elevations, I've only had issues with cold while using an alcohol stove. Maybe on those few nights, the alcohol was just too cold. I've been unable to light my alcohol stove at temperatures around 0 degrees in the Whites before.

  4. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-14-2015
    Location
    Texas
    Age
    33
    Posts
    168

    Default

    Achilles, that is definitely a possibility. I will try that next time it is giving me problems. Im by far no master of the alcohol stove.

  5. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-15-2016
    Location
    Sierra Madre, California
    Posts
    275

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    It's not much extra to also carry an alcohol stove and some fuel for when using the wood stove isn't practical.
    It is also not too much to carry a stove that you can turn off. Just because we're having some rain in California does not mean we are fireproof. Hiking mile after mile of burn areas gets really old. Seeing those burn areas expand every year gets really old. Not adding to the fire danger along the PCT is much appreciated.

  6. #26
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-03-2005
    Location
    Rockingham VT and Boston, MA
    Age
    71
    Posts
    1,221
    Images
    1

    Default

    In a summer hike I've found that a hot meal is not important. There is plenty of options for cold food. I save the weight of stove and fuel and carry more food.
    Everything is in Walking Distance

  7. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-14-2015
    Location
    Texas
    Age
    33
    Posts
    168

    Default

    Since last night ive been thinking more and more about stoveless. going to start searching some food options.

  8. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-14-2015
    Location
    Texas
    Age
    33
    Posts
    168

    Default

    Was thinking of doing freeze dried food for my dog because it is lighter, would need a stove for that. also been looking into meal replacements for her but havent found anything i would trust.

  9. #29

    Default

    Tortillas, cheese, PB, honey, sundried or roma tomatoes, gorp, poptarts, dried fruit, bagels

  10. #30
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-20-2013
    Location
    Upper East Side of Texas
    Age
    74
    Posts
    8,330

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wooobie View Post
    Since last night ive been thinking more and more about stoveless. going to start searching some food options.
    The options are only limited by your palette.
    Tiny off the wall stores in the middle of NoWhere may present a problem.
    Good luck.
    Wayne


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Eddie Valiant: "That lame-brain freeway idea could only be cooked up by a toon."
    https://wayne-ayearwithbigfootandbubba.blogspot.com
    FlickrMyBookTwitSpaceFace



  11. #31

    Default

    On PCT you will encounter areas of fire ban, where wood stove is inadvisable and maybe illegal as well. You could use a wood stove that allows for a backup option like Esbit. There may be areas where even that is not OK.
    Find the LIGHT STUFF at QiWiz.net

    The lightest cathole trowels, wood burning stoves, windscreens, spatulas,
    cooking options, titanium and aluminum pots, and buck saws on the planet



  12. #32

    Default

    Having been 'smoked out' by someone with a small woodstove, be mindful of your nearby campers.

  13. #33
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-14-2015
    Location
    Texas
    Age
    33
    Posts
    168

    Default

    Ill be sure to keep everyone around me happy at all times.

  14. #34
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-13-2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    61

    Default

    Not sure about freeze dried meals, but this past year I went "stoveless" probably for 80% of nights even though I carried a stove the whole way. Just soaked the meals I dehydrated in a freezer bag for a couple hours while I was hiking at the end of the day, and then I could eat right when I was done hiking.

    Might work for you and your dog

  15. #35
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    58
    Posts
    2,247

    Default

    If the only real problem you had with the alcohol stove was getting it to light and burn in cold conditions, one of the wicking type alcohol stoves, like the Fancy Feast (not the open can with holes in it version) works well even below freezing. Wind, is still always an issue with alcohol, but wicking type burners are super reliable.

    I really like the ease and speed and weight of my canister stove system with windscreen. There are several simple super light canister stove burners out there that work well.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  16. #36

    Default

    Can you find fuel for a wood burning stove on the PCT? Yes and there have been thru-hikers who have done so. However you may need to collect it prior to arriving at your campsite in places so you'll need something to carry it in.

    Do you have experience finding wood to burn in wet weather? Because the PCT isn't all sun. It does rain and snow on you at some point.

    And as some mentioned, when fire restrictions are put in place, some stove types are restricted (those without an off switch) and many NF don't consider a wood stove to be different then a camp fire. Don't be fooled by the wet winter. Summers out west are mostly dry and it's a rare year there isn't a forest fire along the PCT. Fire restrictions are always put in place in mamy parts of California during the dry summer. Have a backup stove available in a bounce box and you should be fine. Just don't use it in high winds that you will sometimes see in SoCal.

    The biggest downside to wood stoves is the time needed to fiddle with it as you boil water. Other stove types are ignite and forget as you set up camp. Which is the reason I rarely use one.

  17. #37
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-14-2015
    Location
    Texas
    Age
    33
    Posts
    168

    Default

    honestly the more i think about it the more i like stoveless. also help me carry less water in the desert since im carrying my dogs water.

  18. #38

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wooobie View Post
    I was hoping because of the snow year the west was having maybe bans wont be as bad. I will always bring a dry meal with me for the just in case moments.
    That's a good idea making you more cook/no cook flexible just in case Woobie.

  19. #39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wooobie View Post
    honestly the more i think about it the more i like stoveless. also help me carry less water in the desert since im carrying my dogs water.
    Ahh Kimosabe you be a wise dog loving wt conscious thru-hiker. This yr you'd likely have to carry less water wt too. How does Murphy handle snow shoes? Does he run off sniffing things out off leash which could get both of you in trouble?

  20. #40
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-14-2015
    Location
    Texas
    Age
    33
    Posts
    168

    Default

    hiking with a dog deff makes you rethink your weight. That bum is always getting carried up some nonsense.

    She is always off leash, she is trained attack dog that i let gallivant up and down the trail attacking unsuspecting hikers.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •