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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by ScareBear View Post
    Costco puts them on display every spring, along with other seasonal merchandise...

    If you can't find them, they are these....

    https://www.cascademountaintech.com/...les-p/1006.htm

    And, yes, you absolutely must use hiking poles on the AT or you will be cited by the Pole Police. They are also a requirement for summiting Whitney. And, you absolutely must wear the pole loops in case of a fall....
    thanks. they have a flip lock version also. I found them on Amazon for $48, which is not so much for carbon fiber/cork handle flip lock poles but I was hoping to find them cheaper yet, at Costco...

  2. #22
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    No, trekking poles are a luxury. You dont "need" them.

  3. #23
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    For a bit of Scottish humor about the use of hiking/trekking poles click on the link below. Note that this article appeared early on in the history of ski pole on the hill, so keep tongue in cheek please. And remember this is "British" humor.

    http://web.archive.org/web/200710131...29/jaccuse.htm
    Everyone has a photographic memory. Not everyone has film.

  4. #24
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    It's a personal preference thing. I like using a single pole, for the tripod effect. I have a hand free for photography, drinking water, and whatever. I also use the pole for my tarp, when on the ground.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  5. #25

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    Do I really need that $700 cuben fiber SUL tent? I say yes. My accountant and Suzie Orman says maybe not. My GF says no. Than the GF says lets go out to eat at that NYC Vegan restaurant where all the celebrities hang out where appetizers start at $25 and a fresh mango juice is $14. I say, "so you're paying?"

    Same thing with trekking poles.

  6. #26
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    Default Do I really need trekking poles?

    Some hikers are true mountain goats. They don't need poles for balance and prefer free hands. I am not one of those hikers. I trip, slip, and stumble my way through life. My poles have saved me from big falls on steep descents many times.
    You can walk in another person's shoes, but only with your feet

  7. #27
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    I use then because they save my knees!

  8. #28
    Registered User AlyontheAT2016's Avatar
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    If your pack weight is more than 20 lbs, then yes. Your knees will thank you.
    AT '16: 1,378 miles GA-NY

    trail journal
    // blog

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyontheAT2016 View Post
    If your pack weight is more than 20 lbs, then yes. Your knees will thank you.
    The VA says you're fine. If you needed trekking poles, you would have been issued trekking poles.


  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Secondmouse View Post
    recently? they were never in my store and they're not on the website..
    Yes, maybe three weeks ago. They never were a catalog item, or I'd have ordered them.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by rafe View Post
    Yes, maybe three weeks ago. They never were a catalog item, or I'd have ordered them.

    You can get them on Amazon for a few $ more, or on Ebay for a few $ less. Just search on carbon trekking poles.

  12. #32

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    I like my pacer poles.

  13. #33
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    need? nope.

    extremely beneficial? yep.

  14. #34
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    I'm relatively young, early 40s, and outside of some creaky knees in rekatively good trail shape. I thought trekking poles were silly for a guy like me till I tried them. My big take aways are ... 1). They truly do save your knees on downhill. 2). I can motor on ascents...it gives you that extra hmph in your step to maintain a decent pace. 3) Lastly and most important...Learn how to properly adjust/use the straps on the poles. There are plenty of videos on YouTube to show you how.
    Great thing about poles is you can fold em up or compress them and stow them on your pack so you have them when you need them.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  15. #35

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    Another vote for yes. But don't take our word for it, try them for yourself and see if you like them.

    I was reluctant at first, having recurring rotator cuff issues. I bought a cheap pair at Walmart, and found they didn't hurt my shoulder, but did help with trips and momentary balance loss. They are great for spider web removal. They keep my hands from swelling. They allow me to go with a lighter tent; one that utilizes them as tent poles. They help take weight off my knees on down hill sections, and help on the uphill sections, too.

    After losing tips on my walmart poles, I bought a pair of the Cascade Mountain Tech poles - the ones with the foam grips and flick locks, for only a little more than the walmart poles cost.

    Compared to much of our gear, they aren't very expensive.
    If you find you don't like them, stop using them. Sell them to someone else or keep them for a friend to use.

  16. #36

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    Mandatory equipment as far as I'm concerned. So many uses beyond saving knee-wear. Just a few examples, they make sketchy stream crossings much easier, tap them together to warn bears of your approach, brush aside overgrown trail growth, prop up a small tarp, you get the idea.

  17. #37
    Registered User JPritch's Avatar
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    As a person who chooses not to use them, I think you should use them and they help tremendously.

    All those hikers couldn't be wrong. My hikes serve a dual purpose of getting my legs ready for some trail races I do, so I avoid the poles. But once those days are behind me, I'm gonna get a pair. The one downside I have seen though is they are a bit of a pain anytime you need both hands such as scaling a tricky section on all fours.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPritch View Post
    The one downside I have seen though is they are a bit of a pain anytime you need both hands such as scaling a tricky section on all fours.
    Yes, that happens, but pretty rarely. Maybe some stretches in the White Mountains and Mahoosucs. That's why most poles are made to collapse so that that they can be stashed. In super steep stuff I often stash one or both poles so that my hands are free. They get stashed when I'm hitching into or out of town.

  19. #39
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    Most backpacks have a way to stow your poles on the outside of the pack while you scramble away...

  20. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by ScareBear View Post
    Most backpacks have a way to stow your poles on the outside of the pack while you scramble away...
    Yes, this is truly a non-issue. Easy to stow, or just hold in one hand briefly if the scramble isn't too long or technical.

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