Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 56
  1. #21
    Registered User KDogg's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-30-2015
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    267

    Default

    This is extremely common on the AT. If we needed water and the trail to the source was steep or long, we dropped our pack right there and walked down to get water. Saw this all the time. Also saw packs left while folks went into the woods to do their business. Didn't hear of anything getting stolen on the trail. In town would be different but was still extremely common to see a bunch backpacks leaning on the wall at pizza hut while everyone was inside eating. There were few to no stores or restaurants that allowed packs inside. Not sure what folks think they are going to do. Take turns? Nobody gets in the way of hiker hunger.

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,008

    Default

    I have always made it a habit to drop my pack a few yard off trail when I take a short side trail for water or to scout a camping spot.

    It's rare for me to be separated from within the immediate vicinity of my pack but I will do it. I'm of RmcPeak's opinion. My pack is normally 20 lbs or less in a low volume UL package so it usually goes with me. I will ditch it to get water downhill or bear bag it as I have at the bottom of Half Dome before ascending or bear bag it if I'm doing a side summit like Mt Thielsen or Mt hood.

    If you saw a pack left at a trail crossing would you assume the owner is coming back for it?

    Yes it is usually obvious what folks have done

    Is there a sign I should leave, like a shirt in a car window?

    Some do but it depends on the situation and the trail/route.

  3. #23

    Default

    Let's say said pack has been left by its owner and I walk by and chipmunks are circling and ready to start boring holes into it, or a bear is approaching with intent to take it and rip it to shreds...

    Is it my responsibility to guard the pack until the owner comes back or to get into a bear encounter over someone else's pack?

    Personally, I think I would put some effort into it, call out loud to try to alert the owner but not risk injury if things escalated....
    Last edited by cmoulder; 03-25-2017 at 08:20.

  4. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-09-2016
    Location
    Sanford, NC
    Age
    42
    Posts
    564

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    Let's say said pack has been left by its owner and I walk by and chipmunks are circling and ready to start boring holes into it, or a bear is approaching with intent to take it and rip it to shreds...

    Is it my responsibility to guard the pack until the owner comes back or to get into a bear encounter over someone else's pack?
    No, if a bear is getting after some food I think you better go the opposite way. I can replace a pack and all of it's contents. I can't replace you. As for the voracious gangs of chipmunk vandals, that's your call.
    You can walk in another person's shoes, but only with your feet

  5. #25
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
    Location
    Golden CO
    Age
    63
    Posts
    5,436
    Images
    2

    Default

    Mountaineer Gerry Roach has published an absolute rule I always keep in mind, "Never leave your lunch behind."

    I've neglected that rule a few times, and have paid the price a couple of times too often. Never mind bears. Damn ravens, even ermine got in there once and did a lot of damage, in literally a few minutes with me thirty feet away.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  6. #26

    Default

    It really is a judgement call at the time. Leaving a pack unattended with food in it at a popular lunch spot or campsite is not a good idea as local critters know this is a place to look for scraps. While it's possible a critter could come along and find a pack left at some random spot off the trail, the chances are reasonably slim.

    I left a power bar on a picnic table at Big Meadows and walked away to say hello to some hikers I knew. I happened to turn around just in time to see a big crow swoop down, grab the power bar (which I had just paid $2 for) and fly off. I chased him over a hill and found a whole pile of candy and power bar wrappers scattered about.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  7. #27

    Default

    There was photo of pine marten up in the whites in recent thread, the reason it was hanging around was waiting for someone to leave their pack. They can gnaw a hole through the pack, get whatever is good and be gone in seconds. I expect there are plenty of other food habituated critters of various types including bears that also have figured out the risk is worth the reward.

  8. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-11-2017
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Age
    36
    Posts
    138

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post
    Mountaineer Gerry Roach has published an absolute rule I always keep in mind, "Never leave your lunch behind."

    I've neglected that rule a few times, and have paid the price a couple of times too often. Never mind bears. Damn ravens, even ermine got in there once and did a lot of damage, in literally a few minutes with me thirty feet away.
    Ravens are incredibly expedient in snagging unattended food.

    I was hiking along the beamer trail on the colorado in the grand canyon and stopped by the river for lunch. Seeing my blocks of cheese (2) was looking quite soft, I thought I was being clever wedging it in between some rocks by the ice cold colorado river to firm it up a bit. As I was sitting there making lunch, a raven swooped down, grabbed one block of cheese in the beak, and double fisted the second block in it's talon and flew off.

    I didn't feel quite as clever then.

  9. #29

    Default

    One thing not mentioned is that many folks never let their cash and ID out of their sight

  10. #30
    Clueless Weekender Another Kevin's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-10-2011
    Location
    Niskayuna, New York
    Age
    64
    Posts
    3,876
    Journal Entries
    10

    Default

    The last time I walked away from my pack was to swim. I hung it in a tree a few dozen yards from the lake. It was a weird feeling, being miles from anywhere with just my water shoes. Literally naked in the wilderness.

    Even though it's common around here to make a base camp and go off for a day peak-bagging, it's just not how I roll. I always store food properly or don't leave it. That includes taking my food bag with me on nighttime outings if I've decided to sleep with it. I'm also not comfortable just walking away from my gear.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  11. #31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post
    Mountaineer Gerry Roach has published an absolute rule I always keep in mind, "Never leave your lunch behind."

    I've neglected that rule a few times, and have paid the price a couple of times too often. Never mind bears. Damn ravens, even ermine got in there once and did a lot of damage, in literally a few minutes with me thirty feet away.
    I always keep my money, credit/debit cards, ID, lighter, knife and headlamp on my person...that way if I'm separated from my pack I have some basic resources.

  12. #32

    Default

    I have cached my pack. There aren't many animals on the trail, bear or otherwise. They are generally around people concentrations because that is where the food is. I don't think I would leave valuables like money, id, phones, cameras in a cached pack.

  13. #33

    Default

    This is a good topic to remind me to pay attention. Early in my hike, I was with a trail buddy, and would leave my pack with him as I scrambled down some horrific slope to get water for us.

    One day, I got miles ahead of my friend, I left my pack at the trail junction to climb Shuckstack tower. I wasn't at all worried about people stealing my stuff, but I completely spaced the concept that animals might invade my pack, with possible harm to the animals long term. I got lucky, but it's really best not to rely on luck too often.

  14. #34

    Default

    Yeah, I spend a lot of time worrying about poisoning a chipmunk with twinkies or a hunny bun. It is probably not a good idea to leave you pack unattended around shelters or where folks a likely to be. The critters get accustomed to people food.

  15. #35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swjohnsey View Post
    Yeah, I spend a lot of time worrying about poisoning a chipmunk with twinkies or a hunny bun. It is probably not a good idea to leave you pack unattended around shelters or where folks a likely to be. The critters get accustomed to people food.
    I'm less worried about poisoning a chipmunk as habituating bears to packs as a food source which will eventually get them shot.

  16. #36

    Default

    Your chances of seeing a bear in the woods is about the same as getting hit by a meteorite.

  17. #37

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swjohnsey View Post
    Your chances of seeing a bear in the woods is about the same as getting hit by a meteorite.
    That's not exactly true. Bears I've seen: two. Meteorites I've been hit by: zero.

    There are plenty of bears in the Appalachian Mountains, and chances are if you spend enough time there you will see one or more.

    Don't make it easy for them to take your food and/or become habituated to doing so.

  18. #38

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swjohnsey View Post
    Your chances of seeing a bear in the woods is about the same as getting hit by a meteorite.
    I must just be unlucky then. I have seen more bears than I have been hit by meteorites.

  19. #39

    Default

    To those that leave their packs unattended while running off to do something, I have a question. Do you hang your food at night? If so, why? Just wondering if people are being consistent in what they say they are doing.

  20. #40

    Default

    You find bears where food is, national parks, shelters, garbage dumps. I've seen bears on the trail, in parks, at shelters. I sleep with my food.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •