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  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-22-2017
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    1

    Default Am I going to ROAST?

    Hi all,

    I'm starting my PCT hike in a few weeks, with a lot of borrowed kit from my father.

    I've just realized that the sleeping bag I'm borrowing (Haglofs Leo -10) was made for much colder climates and I'm very worried about being uncomfortably warm every night, especially since it has a short side zip and doesn't full open.

    For some reason I can't find many links to the item but I have found this one for some product info:
    https://scandinavianoutdoor.com/hagl...g-bags/leo-10/

    My question to you, is will i absolutely roast my way along the PCT or should I be ok?

    Thanks in advance -

    Oliver

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-25-2015
    Location
    Neptune Beach
    Age
    51
    Posts
    645

    Default

    I was cold many nights on my JMT Thru hike in 2016 with a 20 degree bag. Slept in all of my clothes most nights.

    My tent 6 Moon Designs Skyscaper is a very airy tent.

    YMMV


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #3

    Default

    It's rated 14f for men, which is probably exactly what you want. The short side zip might be annoying in warmer temps

  4. #4

    Default

    Rated to -10C which is about 15*F...slightly toastier than what many carry with a 20* bag. I think you will be perfectly fine, especially in the Sierras. You can always open it up and use it as more of a quilt with a footbox and drape it over you.

    The deserts have hot days and cold nights. The mountains have warm days and cold nights. The lowlands of N.Cal and Oregon are where you may find it too warm but I'm sure you'll adapt. I take my 10* quilt on every trip.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    17,739

    Default

    Going to be too warm at some point. Consider you get an added 8-10 *F warmth bump inside an enclosed tent and another 5-15* depending on the clothing in which you sleep. Possible solution: cowboy camp wearing next days hiking clothing to sleep which can be shorts and tee or LS sun protecting shirt. You'll be laying that bag over you and pushing it off you to sleep eventually which makes it a very heavy groundsheet or cover sheet. Could be OK for your first 6 or so wks though. By that time you'll have developed a better PCT gear junkie awareness to assist you going forward from there.

  6. #6

    Default

    There were a few nights, mostly in NorCal (and in SoCal neat the I-10), where it was too warm with my 20F quilt. In fact, I slept on top of it three timed in my hiking clothes. A few other times , I was saved from having to do so because I camped deliberately in a windy spot. And then there was a really cold night in NoWash, where I had to wear my hiking clothes under my quilt to stay warm.

  7. #7

    Default

    If too warm, you can always sleep under part of it, but if it's too cold, you can't magically make the bag warmer. Err on the side of too warm, although without experience with your specific bag, I can't say if the short zip will be a problem. I pack a 20F (-6C) bag all year. And at under 1 kg, its fine.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-11-2015
    Location
    Berkeley, Ca.
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Hey Ollie,

    You've got some great advice here. Nothing I can quibble at. Excellent exposition of the factors. The two keys are your tolerance and how conditions work out. Only one is known!

    But, what's crucial are present conditions and your start date. The Sierra is BURIED in snow. I hear the Cascades are too. The Sierra will have more snow along the crest this year THROUGH Summer than 2010-11.

    So I guess I'd add timing to the mix.

    From personal experience I'd say that the Sierra has really heated up during Summer. Typical runs of 20s at night are getting rarer and rarer, but still randomly occur. I'd say bag requirements are slowly declining, but each year has its specific characteristics, and this one is the face of snow, a huge thaw, and very very difficult travel conditions.


    Every year has been heating up earlier and hotter for over twenty five years now... so thing are going to get very wet very quickly if that pattern holds this year.


    My April One Backpacker's Alert

    http://tahoetowhitney.org/content/ba...t-april-1-2017

    Track the evolution of High Sierra Conditions this year

    https://tahoetowhitney.com/2017-high...alendar.html#4


    So right now it's starting with Spring Desert Nights (chilly), to snow-covered Sierra Nevada (Wet as hell, soon), & my trail ends on the North end of the Tahoe Basin (which will likely be buried into August).


    Great advice here. It's like thousands of "me," all in one place!

    ARRRRRG. How Frustrating!


    Ha-ha-Happy Trails Ollie!

    Alex at Tahoe to Whitney

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