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  1. #41

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    [QUOTE=Hosh;2140128]
    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    It's a myth, often promoted by those in warm climates, that living in a warm climate thins the blood. The viscosity of blood is not thinned by living in warm climates.[
    Agree, I think it's more about a relative tolerance zone of high to low temps and the mind/body's adjustment to it's environment. If you live in Phoenix and tell yourself 115 deg isn't really that hot, it's a dry heat. A low of 80 deg might warrant a puffy.

    Conversely, if you live in Boise and wear gym trunks in January to cool down, 65 degs warrants turning the AC on in the truck.
    That's why some including myself suggest when preparing for a LD hike/thru-hike to sleep outside in the cold and rain in your trail shelter in your bag/quilt, wearing your trail clothing, eating anticipated trail food, cooking on your trail stove, walking around town and accomplishing errands like grocery shopping using just your backpack, turning the heat off or below 65* in the house, opening windows, reducing electronic connectivity, etc You're prepping yourself by adjusting to your environment, taking on and expanding new comfort ranges, and not expecting the environment to change for us but for us to cooperate with the environment. Think how much better the world would be if we chose cooperation with the environment rather than having basing civilization on the notion humanity is separate and above the environment.

  2. #42
    4eyedbuzzard's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Dogwood;2140267]
    Quote Originally Posted by Hosh View Post

    That's why some including myself suggest when preparing for a LD hike/thru-hike to sleep outside in the cold and rain in your trail shelter in your bag/quilt, wearing your trail clothing, eating anticipated trail food, cooking on your trail stove, walking around town and accomplishing errands like grocery shopping using just your backpack, turning the heat off or below 65* in the house, opening windows...
    Or just wait for the wife to go through menopause. Sorry. Had. To. Do. It.

  3. #43
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    [QUOTE=Dogwood;2140267]
    Quote Originally Posted by Hosh View Post

    That's why some including myself suggest when preparing for a LD hike/thru-hike to sleep outside in the cold and rain in your trail shelter in your bag/quilt, wearing your trail clothing, eating anticipated trail food, cooking on your trail stove, walking around town and accomplishing errands like grocery shopping using just your backpack, turning the heat off or below 65* in the house, opening windows, reducing electronic connectivity, etc You're prepping yourself by adjusting to your environment, taking on and expanding new comfort ranges, and not expecting the environment to change for us but for us to cooperate with the environment. Think how much better the world would be if we chose cooperation with the environment rather than having basing civilization on the notion humanity is separate and above the environment.
    I think I agree, but having trouble reading this from my vibrating, roller massage, heated recliner with electro stimulus and built in data port.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf - 23000 View Post
    2 lbs 8 oz. is a lot heavier than the packs that I used for my thru-hikes even back in the 1990s. In K-Mart for example, under kids school supplies are school book bags that are less than a pound. No special fabrics needed just plain nylon. If you keep your total pack weight in the 10 - 15 pound range, it is really all you need.

    Wolf

    Wolf
    And you might find one with Dora the Explorer on it. An added bonus


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #45
    Registered User Wolf - 23000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heliotrope View Post
    And you might find one with Dora the Explorer on it. An added bonus


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Well in 1996, I thru-hiked the PCT with a Mikey Mouse book bag. It was a good ice breaker and some people got a good laugh.

  6. #46
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    That is hilarious! And quite possibly a record. You might be able to claim an FKT while carrying a Disney pack.
    I think photos and a gear list are in order


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #47

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    My girlfriend and I dehydrate EVERYTHING. We did the Colorado trail this summer on 1.35 lbs of food a day for the whole trip (we weighed everything to the .1 gram hehe). At the beginning of the first few sections we were giving food to others to get rid of it. My GF focused on really nutritious food and high calorie snacks. We've been making our own backpack food for almost 20 years so we have it pretty dialed in. Disclaimer is that we're pretty small...I'm 135 lbs and she weighs a lot less than me. We definitely leaned out on our hike a bit but I only lost a few lbs and I don't think she lost anything. Base weight for the Colorado trail was about 10 lbs for both of us. I was never cold or hungry

  8. #48
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=4eyedbuzzard;2140271]
    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Or just wait for the wife to go through menopause. Sorry. Had. To. Do. It.
    Dont knock sleeping next to a walking furnace until you've tried it! Self cleaning, self fueling bundle of night-time warmth.

  9. #49

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    [QUOTE=4eyedbuzzard;2140271]
    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Or just wait for the wife to go through menopause. Sorry. Had. To. Do. It.

    My wife is 52. She keeps the house 65 F I have low bodyfat...Im always freezing. Sometimes I go outside to warm up.
    I sleep with electric blanket on my side of the bed year-round.

    its not funny

    do they ever get PAST it???

  10. #50
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=MuddyWaters;2140352]
    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post


    My wife is 52. She keeps the house 65 F I have low bodyfat...Im always freezing. Sometimes I go outside to warm up.
    I sleep with electric blanket on my side of the bed year-round.

    its not funny

    do they ever get PAST it???
    I hear ya, and I would say yes eventually, but my wife (59 yo) is in her 7-8th year of hot flash/night sweats... sorry, might be a while. We negotiated our house to 67.

  11. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by Heliotrope View Post
    And you might find one with Dora the Explorer on it. An added bonus ...
    Bought one for my niece. Also gave her Dora the Explorer socks. It was so cute when she said "wait Uncle Chuck I have to get on my hiking socks and get my backpack when I told her we we're going for a hike...around the block with the dog.

    Don't mess with Dora. I've watched umpteen episodes with my two nieces.

  12. #52
    Registered User Wolf - 23000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heliotrope View Post
    That is hilarious! And quite possibly a record. You might be able to claim an FKT while carrying a Disney pack.
    I think photos and a gear list are in order


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    It, not the first time I ever used a book bag to thru-hike. That was back in 1989 while doing the AT. 1996 was the first time I used a Disney pack to thru-hike. The picture quality is not the best but here is a scan in photo of me starting off my 1996 PCT thru-hike. Back then there were no digital cameras. You canít see Mickey on the pack but that me with my full pack starting the PCT.

    My point being with my post is if someone is going UL, it maybe a little old school thru-hiking with a kids book bag but it still works. There are packs now that are lighter of course but they are still lighter than a pound.

    Wolf

    Starting the PCT.jpg

  13. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by hipbone View Post
    My girlfriend and I dehydrate EVERYTHING. We did the Colorado trail this summer on 1.35 lbs of food a day for the whole trip (we weighed everything to the .1 gram hehe). At the beginning of the first few sections we were giving food to others to get rid of it. My GF focused on really nutritious food and high calorie snacks. We've been making our own backpack food for almost 20 years so we have it pretty dialed in. Disclaimer is that we're pretty small...I'm 135 lbs and she weighs a lot less than me. We definitely leaned out on our hike a bit but I only lost a few lbs and I don't think she lost anything. Base weight for the Colorado trail was about 10 lbs for both of us. I was never cold or hungry
    Very nice! I freeze dried kiwi for the first time. WOW! Awesome!
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf - 23000 View Post
    It, not the first time I ever used a book bag to thru-hike. That was back in 1989 while doing the AT. 1996 was the first time I used a Disney pack to thru-hike. The picture quality is not the best but here is a scan in photo of me starting off my 1996 PCT thru-hike. Back then there were no digital cameras. You canít see Mickey on the pack but that me with my full pack starting the PCT.

    My point being with my post is if someone is going UL, it maybe a little old school thru-hiking with a kids book bag but it still works. There are packs now that are lighter of course but they are still lighter than a pound.

    Wolf

    Starting the PCT.jpg
    That's awesome! Thanks for sharing the photo. And with all the heavy books that kids carry yours was probably lighter


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  15. #55

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    Decided to go with 4 days of food to start.

    Also scored an Exped Synmat with a pump bag/dry sack. This allowed me to get rid of my compactor bag and CF bag for sleeping bag (had already ditched the "original" S2S e-vent drysack compression bag).

    Minus water I am at 18 lbs +/-. I weighed it at 17.5 with poles but without a few items that will be on my body when I am on the dirty dog to get to GA.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  16. #56
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    Any weight under 20 pounds is awesome.

  17. #57
    Registered User Wolf - 23000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TTT View Post
    Any weight under 20 pounds is awesome.
    That depend on you. If your 100 pound hiker then 20 pounds is 20% of your body weight. Yes there really are backpackers who weigh only 100 pounds or less. I don't know around you but I don't want to carry 20% of my body weight. You might enjoy it, I don't. I like my pack were I don't even notice it is on my back.

    Wolf

  18. #58

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    under 1/4 of your weight is the sweet spot, although I've done 1/3 - all depends on your resupply strategy combined with your calorie and other needs

  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf - 23000 View Post
    I don't even notice it is on my back.
    Yes! And not that hard to achieve. Less is more.

  20. #60

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    Here's my list. It's down to 17.5 lbs!

    REI Flash 50 - 40 oz (bought this a number of years ago, new ones may weigh different)
    Exped Synmat 15.5 oz with the pump bag that doubles as my dry sack for clothes and sleeping bag
    Zpacks 40 degree sleeping bag slim/medium 11.4oz (manuf. weight)
    Zpacks solplex tent with 8 carbon fiber stakes 27.28 oz (manuf weight)
    Cocoon Silk mummy liner
    Silk long johns top and bottom
    shorts and shirt to sleep in (Danskin from Walmart)
    EMS Techwick 1/4 zip long sleeve
    REI brand puffy jacket
    Mountain Hardwear head "buff" - thick
    "driving" gloves (I used to wear these on cold mornings when driving before the steering wheel got warmed up)
    chap stick and some type of natural nasal "inhaler" to clear nose allergies
    carrying 2 pair darn tough socks - 1 sleeping, 1 spare hiking
    Hiking poles - Bought these for snow shoeing years back
    2 x Sea 2 Summit dry sacks for food bags (my food is VERY lightweight but bulky - I need to work on better packaging technique)
    small "carabiner" and bear bag line (2mm reflective cord) - 1 will hold 4+ days of food
    spare ex officio underwear
    Jetboil MicroMo
    110 g fuel canister
    lighter (in case)
    2 disposable "trash bags" just ordinary twist tie bags for veggies, with twist ties
    cozy for FBC (though I use a different bag type made for boiling water) with 2 small binder clips
    Ti spoon long handle
    small single blade pocket knife
    3oz plastic bottle with Himalayan salt
    30z plastic bottle with coconut oil
    1oz bottle with white pepper
    1oz bottle of Dr Bronners
    TOOB toothbrush w/paste
    1 single use packet of Fructise shampoo&conditioner (for shower stop)
    equivalent of 2 lightload towels (I use 4 colors for different uses but only half of a 12"x12") - these get resupplied about every week
    comb
    sleep mask and ear plugs
    spare hair band/tie
    Icy Hot (in one of those push style? applicating bottles)
    First aid kit - 2 pieces mole skin, 3' gorilla tape, 3' porous tape, 4 bandaids, 1 weeks allergy meds, 2 days diarhea meds, 2 antiseptic wipes)
    14 Vitamin I
    MIni Sawyer squeeze with a 16oz platypus bag (no back flush tool)
    Hydrapak Seeker 3L (for night time/camping and avoiding multiple trips to water source)
    2 x Smart water 1L bottles (1 with sport nozzle)
    a spare cap for platypus
    a cap with holes drilled for salt and pepper "shakers" - 1 for both
    P style
    Gallon bag w/trowel, TP, and 2 grocery bags for "nasties"
    iphone5, charge cord, dual wall charger, pocket juice 4000 and charge cord, ear phones though I plan on very little use of these in a Qt freezer bag
    small journal and pen (yes), reading glasses, necessary pages from AWOL and pocket constitution all in a Qt freezer bag
    2 bags from limes you buy at the store - I use one for the pstyle and 1 for anything that may need drying (I can hang it outside my pack)
    Food - I freeze dry all my own food. When I weighed 7 days in a box to ship it came out to 6 lbs 12 oz, box and all. I am currently carrying 4 days and likely to add an ounce or two more after I freeze dry my 40 kiwis! LOL so food is only about a pound a day, even adding in my nuts and raisins (not FDed) and my other FDed snacks (berries/kiwi/bananas)
    I also will have my sunglasses and a baseball cap though I didn't have these when doing the weighing. close enough. I may also wear/bring a pair of gaiters.
    Frogg Toggs women's ultralite 2 rain jacket and REI rainpants and energizer headlamp.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

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