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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by theinfamousj View Post
    I bet someone could rig something up using webbing and grommets to approximate the location of the grommets in the footprint for fly-only.

    Based on the tents I have seen with a fast fly option, it would be easy for someone with a thread injector and a grommet kit to do.

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
    Actually, you can use clear gorilla tape and plastic washers.

    I use those hose on my polycro groundsheet.

  2. #42
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    Footprints are a waste of space and weight. That's what I've found, although others may disagree for very legitimate reasons.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by nsherry61 View Post
    Pack your fears.

    If you are afraid of getting small holes in the floor of your tent or having to pack your tent carefully when the floor is muddy, carry a footprint.

    If you realized that small holes in the floor of your tent are easy to fix if you ever need to, and you can always fold your tent up in a way the the muddy floor doesn't get the rest of your tent dirty when packing it, then save the six oz. or so, along with the added clutter and do away with the footprint.
    I definitely fear getting a punctured Thermarest inflatable sleeping pad---this is the main reason I carry a tent footprint. A flat pad can ruin a long backpacking trip, so all efforts must be used to keep the pad happy and inflated.

    What's under my sleeping pad? My tent floor. Is my tent floor thick enough to prevent pinholes and thorn-holes? No. So I use an extra layer tarp (ground cloth) to keep the pinholes away. 10 mil is what I use.

    Do this experiment---Find a rose bush and get a thorn off it---Now see if this thorn will poke thru your ground cloth. 10 mil turns back most thorns, especially when used in tandem with a tent floor. Ergo---A happy sleeping pad.

    I also only use my ground cloth INSIDE the tent, for various reasons---

    P1000218-XL.jpg

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    I definitely fear getting a punctured Thermarest inflatable sleeping pad---this is the main reason I carry a tent footprint. A flat pad can ruin a long backpacking trip, so all efforts must be used to keep the pad happy and inflated.

    What's under my sleeping pad? My tent floor. Is my tent floor thick enough to prevent pinholes and thorn-holes? No. So I use an extra layer tarp (ground cloth) to keep the pinholes away. 10 mil is what I use.

    Do this experiment---Find a rose bush and get a thorn off it---Now see if this thorn will poke thru your ground cloth. 10 mil turns back most thorns, especially when used in tandem with a tent floor. Ergo---A happy sleeping pad.

    I also only use my ground cloth INSIDE the tent, for various reasons---

    P1000218-XL.jpg
    I definitely agree with you that if you carry an inflatable you always run the risk of puncture with nothing but a tent floor under your pad. I deal with that by always putting a Gossamer Gear 1/8 inch foam pad under my inflatable. It's far better than any footprint for preventing punctures and it doubles as a fine sit pad while weighing less than 3 ounces. My Exped never had a puncture in 2200 miles using that system.

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bansko View Post
    I definitely agree with you that if you carry an inflatable you always run the risk of puncture with nothing but a tent floor under your pad. I deal with that by always putting a Gossamer Gear 1/8 inch foam pad under my inflatable. It's far better than any footprint for preventing punctures and it doubles as a fine sit pad while weighing less than 3 ounces. My Exped never had a puncture in 2200 miles using that system.
    That's a good system--to use a ccf pad under an inflatable. (Let's not talk about Exped quality control and the tendency for their downmats to blow baffle seams---see below).

    The only problem with placing all your weight atop a ccf pad (under the inflatable) is that most backpackers in the Southeast mountains (think briars) place their ccf pads exposed on the outside of their packs. These pads work like pin cushions and get embedded briar thorns, sawbriars and hawthorn spikes which lodge inside the pad. THEN when you plop down in the evening your weight presses down on the ccf pad and pokes a hole in the inflatable with the unseen thorn.

    TRIP 151 040-XL.jpg
    Blown exped baffle on Day 1 of a 19 day winter trip. Oops. And not self-healing.

  6. #46
    Registered User lonehiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    That's a good system--to use a ccf pad under an inflatable. (Let's not talk about Exped quality control and the tendency for their downmats to blow baffle seams---see below).

    The only problem with placing all your weight atop a ccf pad (under the inflatable) is that most backpackers in the Southeast mountains (think briars) place their ccf pads exposed on the outside of their packs. These pads work like pin cushions and get embedded briar thorns, sawbriars and hawthorn spikes which lodge inside the pad. THEN when you plop down in the evening your weight presses down on the ccf pad and pokes a hole in the inflatable with the unseen thorn.

    TRIP 151 040-XL.jpg
    Blown exped baffle on Day 1 of a 19 day winter trip. Oops. And not self-healing.
    Had this issue with a Thermarest in 2015. Was like sleeping on a basketball.
    Lonehiker

  7. #47
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    I carried a Synmat, but I have seen a few photos of blown out Synmat baffles as well. Fortunately, I never experienced that.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by lonehiker View Post
    Had this issue with a Thermarest in 2015. Was like sleeping on a basketball.
    I've had many Thermarest delaminations over the years---this being my last blowout on a trip to Slickrock Creek in 2015---

    Trip 165 288-XL.jpg
    And don't think it makes a great pillow---It don't!!! And it keeps growing day by day. Luckily I had my Solar ccf pad in reserve.

  9. #49
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    According to BA, all their tents floors are just water-resistant only. You do need footprint to make it water-proof. Is the AT very dry trail? If so, you donít need to worry about that.

    Sent from my ASUS_Z01HD using Tapatalk

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Runner2017 View Post
    According to BA, all their tents floors are just water-resistant only. You do need footprint to make it water-proof. Is the AT very dry trail? If so, you donít need to worry about that.

    Sent from my ASUS_Z01HD using Tapatalk
    If this is true, that all BA tent floors are not waterproof, then that's the stupidest thing a tent company can say. The whole point of a tent floor is to be waterproof with a high hydrostatic head. Why? Because on occasion if you're out long enough a tentsite will fill with water and form a small lake for short duration. A good tent floor keeps this water out!

    TRIP 80 022-L.jpg
    Oops, midnight gully washer---two inch deluge in 30 minutes---time for an excellent tent floor.

  11. #51
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    I have no use for footprints. I much prefer to treat every external seam with sealant (using Tarptent's formula). I consider those precious ounces much better utilized that way. Not conjecture, experience.

  12. #52

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    While a piece of tyvek would have been cheaper than my footprint, having a footprint with grommets allows me to insert the poles so the frame is up, then throw the fly on top. I can duck out of the rain and get into my backpack and pull out the main part of the tent and clip onto the poles.

    Ive been timing myself for next years AT attempt...I can put up my tent in the rain in less than 5 minutes...and the only thing that is wet is the fly which I keep along with the poles and footprint on the outside of my pack.
    We donít stop hiking because we grow old, we grow old because we stop hiking.
    - Finis Mitchell


    https://lighterpack.com/r/7kdpc0

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