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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by dudeman_atl View Post
    I'm in a north Georgia triathlon club where our motto is "Do Epic ****". Let me know when you need a ride from the airport to the trail head at Springer.

    Well said!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bansko View Post
    You could do it, but you wouldn't enjoy it. ...
    Why wouldn't he enjoy it? Totally subjective call.

    Try it OP, Hike for 85 days, maybe you finish, maybe you don't

  3. #43
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    Lone Wolf is correct, but I'll jump in anyway. Take the dudeman from Atlanta up on his offer. Having someone who can take your from the airport to the trail with a quick stop at an outfitter store will be a real boost. I'm sure you can do this, Marathoners and Tri-Athletes see a real challenge in knocking out the miles.

    Logistically, you might want to go with the 6 month visa. If you have 90 days, that's from customs in Atlanta to check in at Portland (or whatever airports you are using). That doesn't give you much extra time to deal with food, replace shoes, equipment, or what ever else might happen in those 85 days. I looked at Meltzer's trail run last night and while he did it in 46 days, his support team did everything. You'll be doing this self-supported in every sense of the word. If you can find other endurance athletes who can support you in any way, that would be great.

    Good luck!

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Rush- View Post
    Why limit yourself to 85 days of walking 3-4mph for 15-20 hours? Just run half the time and you can do it in 60 or maybe beat the record of 45! Seriously, if you're trying to get it done as quickly as possible you might as well trail run it. All of those who have attempted and completed the AT in 100 or less days have no time to stop and enjoy anything. They all lament this once they've completed it or quit. So, calling it a hike isn't accurate, it's more of an endurance challenge for the body and the definitely the mind.

    If you want a more prestigious accomplishment just sign up or the Barkley Marathons next year. It's only 100 miles.
    Really???? I hiked the PCT in under 100 days and greatly enjoyed it. There isn't a day that goes by I don't want to go do it again in the exact same style. Keep in mind, not everyone is like you.
    enemy of unnecessary but innovative trail invention gadgetry

  5. #45

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    Many could do it
    Many couldnt

    Can you? And have fun?
    No one here knows.
    No harm in trying
    Beats typing at a computer keyboard

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malto View Post
    Really???? I hiked the PCT in under 100 days and greatly enjoyed it. There isn't a day that goes by I don't want to go do it again in the exact same style. Keep in mind, not everyone is like you.
    Why directly quote a comment about the AT and then talk about the PCT? The PCT isn't even remotely close to the AT. I've never thru-hiked the AT, so this really isn't about everyone being like me, but of those I've seen that have attempted or completed the AT in 100 or less days it's very clear, to me at least, that it's a grueling task that doesn't afford you the time to smell the flowers, enjoy the towns, explore the blue blazes, etc.
    "Though I have lost the intimacy with the seasons since my hike, I retain the sense of perfect order, of graceful succession and surrender, and of the bold brilliance of fall leaves as they yield to death." - David Brill

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Rush- View Post
    Why directly quote a comment about the AT and then talk about the PCT? The PCT isn't even remotely close to the AT. I've never thru-hiked the AT, so this really isn't about everyone being like me, but of those I've seen that have attempted or completed the AT in 100 or less days it's very clear, to me at least, that it's a grueling task that doesn't afford you the time to smell the flowers, enjoy the towns, explore the blue blazes, etc.
    Just what I got from watching Bigfoot last year seemed he enjoyed it and finished in 99 days. Now that's not to say that there may have been a couple times where he might have wished he could stay an extra day/night in town or checking something out. But all in all, it seems to me that he had a great time.
    AT: 471 mi

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  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Rush- View Post
    Why directly quote a comment about the AT and then talk about the PCT? The PCT isn't even remotely close to the AT. I've never thru-hiked the AT, so this really isn't about everyone being like me, but of those I've seen that have attempted or completed the AT in 100 or less days it's very clear, to me at least, that it's a grueling task that doesn't afford you the time to smell the flowers, enjoy the towns, explore the blue blazes, etc.
    I agree with Malto. The average hike of the PCT takes about 140 days. To accomplish it in less than 100 is quite a feat that many would call reckless. But he enjoyed it. No reason a fast hiker on the AT can't do the same.

    But there is a subtle difference between a fast hike and a speed attempt!

    For what it's worth, my average speed on the PCT was about 18 miles per day. When I hiked the AT five years later, my average speed was 20 miles per day. (At 106 days, that was not a speed attempt, just the average pace I'd developed on the PCT and improved on the CDT.) Using that one empirical datum as fact, I can prove the AT is actually easier than the PCT. In fact, I did enjoy the AT more than the previous hikes. I didn't have a single bad day on the AT. Many days on the other trails were definitely "type II fun."

    In fairness, I also believe one's first thru-hike is the hardest, no matter which trail it is. For most, that happens to be the AT.

    I agree the AT and PCT had few similarities, but I thought the AT's ease of resupply, low elevation, and unbelievable water access greatly eased many aspects of long distance hiking.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Rush- View Post
    Why directly quote a comment about the AT and then talk about the PCT? The PCT isn't even remotely close to the AT. I've never thru-hiked the AT, so this really isn't about everyone being like me, but of those I've seen that have attempted or completed the AT in 100 or less days it's very clear, to me at least, that it's a grueling task that doesn't afford you the time to smell the flowers, enjoy the towns, explore the blue blazes, etc.
    I have hiked more miles on the AT than the PCT and while the trails are different the concept of a fast hike is not. And what makes you think that others want to "enjoy towns" and smell flowers? Everyone has different motivations, you don't seem to be to accept this.
    enemy of unnecessary but innovative trail invention gadgetry

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by JC13 View Post
    Just what I got from watching Bigfoot last year seemed he enjoyed it and finished in 99 days. Now that's not to say that there may have been a couple times where he might have wished he could stay an extra day/night in town or checking something out. But all in all, it seems to me that he had a great time.
    It appeared to me that he enjoyed it a lot more when he knew he was going to complete his goal. I met him on the trail in 2016 and he only spoke when I engaged him despite at least 12 hikers being within 5ft of him. He looked beat down, unhappy, and talked about the remaining miles he had to do. He did keep most of his videos positive from what I saw, but I don't think the videos accurately reflected what he was going through out there.
    "Though I have lost the intimacy with the seasons since my hike, I retain the sense of perfect order, of graceful succession and surrender, and of the bold brilliance of fall leaves as they yield to death." - David Brill

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malto View Post
    I have hiked more miles on the AT than the PCT and while the trails are different the concept of a fast hike is not. And what makes you think that others want to "enjoy towns" and smell flowers? Everyone has different motivations, you don't seem to be to accept this.
    The OPs stated motivation is to stay inside a 3 month visa. It appears he may be able to do that. He might be wiser to take the trouble to get a 6 month visa, and do the trip as fast or slow as suits him, without excess time pressure.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post
    In fairness, I also believe one's first thru-hike is the hardest, no matter which trail it is. For most, that happens to be the AT.

    I agree the AT and PCT had few similarities, but I thought the AT's ease of resupply, low elevation, and unbelievable water access greatly eased many aspects of long distance hiking.
    No doubt resupply is easier on the AT, but the cumulative elevation gain is a good deal more than what's encountered on the PCT, and what about this statement from the AMC?

    Are the Appalachians lower in elevation? Sure. Do they pack in steeper and more rugged trails than mountain ranges out West on a mile-per-mile basis? Absolutely.And these stats don’t take into account the much more challenging trail conditions you often find in the East compared to out West, including mile after mile of rock-choked, root-crossed trail, as well as some extremely steep and sustained climbs that were seemingly developed before the term ‘switchback’ existed in trail building jargon. Not to mention the more fickle weather conditions of the Appalachians compared to the long, long stretches of sun and favorable weather you get during the summer in many Western states (especially California).
    I'm not saying it's impossible to enjoy a 100 day or FKT type of hike, but it's most definitely a grueling task that doesn't afford a person adequate time to enjoy many aspects the trail has to offer. Since a fast hike is focused on making miles, it's seems more about the challenge than sitting on a beautiful vista or spending a zero riverside because it's a great spot. All of these things can be experienced on the AT, but I have yet to see person with a goal like 100 days or FKT actually doing it. Add in aspects like the headache of keeping all of your devices charged so you can upload and document progress and you're leaving little room for the good stuff IMO.
    "Though I have lost the intimacy with the seasons since my hike, I retain the sense of perfect order, of graceful succession and surrender, and of the bold brilliance of fall leaves as they yield to death." - David Brill

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malto View Post
    I have hiked more miles on the AT than the PCT and while the trails are different the concept of a fast hike is not. And what makes you think that others want to "enjoy towns" and smell flowers? Everyone has different motivations, you don't seem to be to accept this.
    See my previous reply. There are outliers in every random sample. I guess my thinking is more in line with backpacking than thru-hiking. Forgive me! The horse is screaming, so we should quit beating on it and let this thread return to the guy trying to knock out the entire AT in 85 days on a 3-month Visa and find enjoyment doing it.
    "Though I have lost the intimacy with the seasons since my hike, I retain the sense of perfect order, of graceful succession and surrender, and of the bold brilliance of fall leaves as they yield to death." - David Brill

  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Rush- View Post
    No doubt resupply is easier on the AT, but the cumulative elevation gain is a good deal more than what's encountered on the PCT, and what about this statement from the AMC?



    I'm not saying it's impossible to enjoy a 100 day or FKT type of hike, but it's most definitely a grueling task that doesn't afford a person adequate time to enjoy many aspects the trail has to offer. Since a fast hike is focused on making miles, it's seems more about the challenge than sitting on a beautiful vista or spending a zero riverside because it's a great spot. All of these things can be experienced on the AT, but I have yet to see person with a goal like 100 days or FKT actually doing it. Add in aspects like the headache of keeping all of your devices charged so you can upload and document progress and you're leaving little room for the good stuff IMO.
    FYI. The year I hiked the PCT was a huge snow year. Nobody in their right mind was ever suggest hiking that year was easier than the AT. The PCT is also 500 miles longer and I average the similiar mileage on both trails.

    However, I have now seen the light. I would like your email so i (and others) can contact you to make sure we would enjoy our trips prior to undertaking it. In fact I see a new career for working for the ATC and maybe the PCTA and other organizations. They could require all hikers to get a certified stamp of -Rush- fun approval prior to undertaking any hike on the trails. They would have to submit a detailed plan of town stops and vista rest points and durations. And at a reasonable cost of $5 it would be a huge moneymaker.

    I wish I had had my epiphany a couple of days ago. I did what I thought at the time was a fun 55 mile day Friday night and Saturday. But now I realize how wrong I was. Now my toe blister hurts, my muscles ache, I am physically and mentally exhausted and I missed bing watching the Real Housewives of Atlanta. I now have a whole perspective on hiking thanks to your brilliant insight based on meeting and talking to one hiker for a few minutes.
    enemy of unnecessary but innovative trail invention gadgetry

  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malto View Post
    FYI. The year I hiked the PCT was a huge snow year. Nobody in their right mind was ever suggest hiking that year was easier than the AT. The PCT is also 500 miles longer and I average the similiar mileage on both trails.

    However, I have now seen the light. I would like your email so i (and others) can contact you to make sure we would enjoy our trips prior to undertaking it. In fact I see a new career for working for the ATC and maybe the PCTA and other organizations. They could require all hikers to get a certified stamp of -Rush- fun approval prior to undertaking any hike on the trails. They would have to submit a detailed plan of town stops and vista rest points and durations. And at a reasonable cost of $5 it would be a huge moneymaker.

    I wish I had had my epiphany a couple of days ago. I did what I thought at the time was a fun 55 mile day Friday night and Saturday. But now I realize how wrong I was. Now my toe blister hurts, my muscles ache, I am physically and mentally exhausted and I missed bing watching the Real Housewives of Atlanta. I now have a whole perspective on hiking thanks to your brilliant insight based on meeting and talking to one hiker for a few minutes.
    I know this was meant to be cynical, if not hurtful, but it is as humorous as anything I could come up with, so I will continue.

    The basis of the OP was that the answer to trying was yes. We all know the odds are low. Lone Wolf predicted MS had a 1:25 chance and LW seems to be a lot more optimistic here. So maybe the odds are only a little worse than average, say 1:5 or 20%. If $5 is a reasonable amount to go to the ATC, I will counter with a $25 pledge if he completes the AT in 88 days by December 2018. Any takers?

  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malto View Post
    I wish I had had my epiphany a couple of days ago. I did what I thought at the time was a fun 55 mile day Friday night and Saturday. But now I realize how wrong I was. Now my toe blister hurts, my muscles ache, I am physically and mentally exhausted and I missed bing watching the Real Housewives of Atlanta. I now have a whole perspective on hiking thanks to your brilliant insight based on meeting and talking to one hiker for a few minutes.
    Wow Malto.. I think you need more electrolytes cupcake. 55 mile days? This thread is about a thru-hike, not a trail run. There's a stark difference between the two. A hike by definition is walking, and I've yet to meet a hiker that sustains 4mph, the speed I consider the peak speed of walking, on 15+ grade trails with a backpack or even an UL grocery bag full of Maltodextrin. 55 mile days would require a AVERAGE speed of 4mph through all elevation changes for 12+ hours - enjoyable? That's not hiking, it sounds like grueling challenge-focused running to me. Dare I say 99% of "hikers" would echo this sentiment.

    Haha! Hope everyone enjoyed yet another short but sweet battle of the blazes. I'm out!
    "Though I have lost the intimacy with the seasons since my hike, I retain the sense of perfect order, of graceful succession and surrender, and of the bold brilliance of fall leaves as they yield to death." - David Brill

  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Rush- View Post
    Wow Malto.. I think you need more electrolytes cupcake. 55 mile days? This thread is about a thru-hike, not a trail run. There's a stark difference between the two. A hike by definition is walking, and I've yet to meet a hiker that sustains 4mph, the speed I consider the peak speed of walking, on 15+ grade trails with a backpack or even an UL grocery bag full of Maltodextrin. 55 mile days would require a AVERAGE speed of 4mph through all elevation changes for 12+ hours - enjoyable? That's not hiking, it sounds like grueling challenge-focused running to me. Dare I say 99% of "hikers" would echo this sentiment.

    Haha! Hope everyone enjoyed yet another short but sweet battle of the blazes. I'm out!
    Wasn't a trail run. I averaged 3.2 mph, had my normal BPing gear, experienced a spectacular dusk and dawn, saw more deer than hikers and didn't run a step. It was a very long, consistent day. On the downside, I'm out of maltodextrin, (it was gatoraid and pop tarts fueled) and I had little sleep. Other than the length of the day it was a pretty normal, though slightly faster day.

    Do you have a good recipe for electrolyte cupcakes? I had some serious food carvings at the end.

    to the OP. I actually thought about this thread quite a bit while hiking yesterday. If I were in your shoes I would do several multiday hikes prior to next year to see if you are capable and willing to hike at this pace. With your running background you have demonstrated either (or both) a good athletic base or a good mental base either of which are a great asset. Where I do agree with many on this thread is that most are not able or willing to do a thru at this pace hence why it is viewed as being drudgery. Only you can answer whether you are capable and/or willing but it's not hard to find out. Good luck
    enemy of unnecessary but innovative trail invention gadgetry

  18. #58
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    Tough
    Pros and cons for your situation compared to others posting here of their or others speedy hikes? Rarely is everything mentioned.

  19. #59
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    Like most people, Malto found a pace on his hikes that worked for him. I am not sure he had a preset "requirement" to hike the PCT in 100 days or less. Or if that is just the way his hike evolved. It makes a big difference.

    Hiking fast is physically hard.

    Hiking to even a moderately challenging but inflexible schedule is mentally hard.

    Hiking fast on rigid schedule is physically and mentally very hard..

    For most new AT thru hikers starting the Trail with the idea you had to finish it in 90 Days is just nuts. Unless finishing the whole thing would be just bonus, and you would be OK with adjusting your goal along the way.
    Last edited by rickb; 05-22-2017 at 04:58.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malto View Post
    How do you know if he would enjoy it?
    Point taken. Everyone hikes the trail for different reasons. I was wrong to assume that he wouldn't enjoy a pure physical challenge with time constraints.

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