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  1. #1
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    Default Best way of carrying 23 oz. mirrorless camera?

    For several years I've gone super light in the photo gear department. Camera was small enough to fit in a pouch attached to shoulder strap of pack, so was always instantly accessible. I like that.

    So I have a new cam that's considerably larger and heavier (photo.) It's a hefty chunk of hardware, about 23 oz. Still want something accessible and practical for general AT hiking. Any ideas?


    20170526_130448.jpg

  2. #2
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
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    I've had good luck with ZPacks lid as a chest strap. Likewise with Aaron of TrailGroove Magazine.

    http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/backpack_lid.shtml

    Works well as a satchel when away from camp or even on the road.

    You can see it in action here and gives you an idea of the camera size:

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  3. #3
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    Hmm. Very interesting, Mags. Considering most "dedicated" camera harnesses cost more than that... Looks like they allow for several means of attaching it - very clever.

  4. #4
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    Let someone else carry it.


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  5. #5
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    Not sure if this will work out for a thru hike, and your unit won't be protected from the elements, but this is what many photog friends of mine use for outdoor shooting. Can mount it right to your shoulder strap for quick use. Figured I'd offer it up!

    https://www.peakdesign.com/capture


    Also, kuddos on going mirrorless, hoping to do the same soon myself!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crushed Grapes View Post
    Not sure if this will work out for a thru hike, and your unit won't be protected from the elements, but this is what many photog friends of mine use for outdoor shooting. Can mount it right to your shoulder strap for quick use. Figured I'd offer it up!

    https://www.peakdesign.com/capture


    Also, kuddos on going mirrorless, hoping to do the same soon myself!

    I am aware of that device though I haven't seen one in use. It weighs a fair bit, just under 4 oz. (Bad enough to be hauling 23 oz. of camera.) Very tempting, otherwise.

    "Protection" for the camera is iffy either way... with any precipitation, it would need to go inside the pack and in a large ziploc.

    Thru hiking is not on the horizon but the usual two or three night outings will continue for as long as possible.

  7. #7
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    I think what I like about it is the quick access. But can't imagine having my DSLR that exposed on a rock scramble of some sort.

  8. #8
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    This thing has worked amazing for me: https://www.peakdesign.com/product/clips


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bpowell1014 View Post
    This thing has worked amazing for me: https://www.peakdesign.com/product/clips


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    You have caught my interest.
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  10. #10
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    The best way is not to carry it. I used to be a professional photographer and believe me I used to use very capable rigs for image capturing. Unless you do print and print big, you don't need to have those rigs measured in lb. For most hikers, a smart phone is sufficient.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bpowell1014 View Post
    This thing has worked amazing for me: https://www.peakdesign.com/product/clips


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    My hiking buddy carried a DSLR on our JMT Thru Hike using the Peak Design. It was rock solid and he never had an issue.


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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Runner2017 View Post
    The best way is not to carry it. I used to be a professional photographer and believe me I used to use very capable rigs for image capturing. Unless you do print and print big, you don't need to have those rigs measured in lb. For most hikers, a smart phone is sufficient.
    This is exactly the answer I might have given, not very long ago. I carried a 35mm SLR over half of the AT in years past. I've shot MF and even 4x5, though not on backpacking trips. For the last few years I've carried a smartphone and a Sony RX-100.

    The new cam won't be going on any thru hikes. Most likely just day hikes and one or two night outings. I hike "local" trails (eg. White Mountains in NH) year round.

    http://terrapinphoto.com/wp/

  13. #13
    Registered User gollwoods's Avatar
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    This is my thrifty solution . I put it in a stocking cap and either attach that with a carabinier or stuff it in the pack it all fits a gallon ziplock

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  14. #14

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    I don't particularly care for the chest mount type camera slings and tried several methods of carrying a DSLR camera with me until I found what worked.

    I now use a fanny pack strapped to the outside of a pack, I have several packs and the fanny pack can adapt to all of them. I think the key is to find a fanny pack with a small built in strap or handle on the inside of the pouch so a carabiner can be used to hold it more securely.

    I prefer to reach for the camera with left hand, so the fanny pack sits just above my left hip, using the waist strap around the pack and a carabiner to hold the top of it to prevent sag. When opened, my DSLR fits snugly inside like a pocket and won't bounce or fall out when I am walking. If weather gets wet, I zip up the fanny pack and the pack cover will get over it fine. It's about as perfect a solution I have found to use.

    Since I am the one usually taking photos, I can't find a photo of how this looks but can get you one if you want to see how I rig it.

  15. #15

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    There is a Youtube video of a guy hiking the AT this year using this: https://www.ospreypacks.com/us/en/pr...ERALG_514.html

  16. #16
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
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    I usually hike wearing a small waist pack that can carry a mirrorless like my Fuji X100. When I had to carry a larger set for a work related backpacking trip last summer, I took a larger waist pack with two Fuji XT1 bodies, three lenses (16, 35, and 90), and lots of batteries. I put the waist pack on first, then my backpack and put the backpack hip belt under the waist pack belt, letting the waist pack ride over the top. It actually works pretty well.
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  17. #17

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    This picture shows how I carry my Nikon One. I put the strap around my neck, then attach the camera to the left shoulder strap with an S hook. This keeps the weight of the camera off my neck, but allows me to swing the camera up to my eye, so I can take pictures without disconnecting the camera. I only disconnect the camera when I take my pack off.
    Attached Images Attached Images
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  18. #18
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    Peak Designs strap clip looks pretty good - a couple of years ago I saw a guy carry his DSLR using this type of mount in Kings Canyon National Park. It gives easy access to the camera but the shortcomings are that you get no protection for rain or dust. I have Sony a6000 with 18-200 lens, so it's pretty sizable too, and I bought a Case Logic camera holster (already discontinued: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007ABIYKA ) and I used Velcro to attach it to pack strap.

  19. #19
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    Thanks for posting this. Just what I needed but never knew it was available.

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