Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 63
  1. #21
    Flip flop, flip flopping' LASHin' 2000 miler
    Join Date
    12-18-2010
    Location
    Flipping between Western Michigan and Key West
    Age
    64
    Posts
    1,167
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    42

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Megapixel View Post
    I'm curious to what other folks have found excels in this category as well...
    Besides nuts and nut butters, oils come in a close second in cal/g. Get a good bottle, with a secure lid, and carry some good oil. I always carry olive oil, and add a couple of ounces to every dinner. Coconut oil tastes good in oatmeal too.

    But those bottles olive oil come in have some flimsy caps once they're opened the first time. I buy an 8 oz bottle and xfer the oil to an 8 oz Nalgene HDPE Wide Mouth Round Container.

    80872.jpg

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...52/?th=1&psc=1

    That cap ain't coming loose in your pack!
    Ldog
    The Laughing Dog Blog

    "The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness." - John Muir

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-09-2017
    Location
    Wayne, New Jersey
    Age
    57
    Posts
    175

    Default

    Fritos and Pringles are good on the cal/gram issue.

  3. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    17,753

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    White flour and refined grains are worse for you than sugar.
    Theres virtually no way to eat 4000 cal per day on trail, or even 3000, without eating a lot of things that arent good for you. Bad fats, sugar, refined flour makes up half of diet, or more. Maybe 90% for some.
    If you avail yourself of the copious amounts of resupply information for trails like the AT, PCT, CDT, LT, etc resupplying at med to large grocery stores, co-ops, health food stores, possibly mailing a couple of boxes to key resupply locations based on your hike, etc there's no reason why one with forethought can't eat healthier. C'mon, grocery store chains now more than ever, even WallyWorlds, are offering consumers more food choices than ever with some choices being healthier. Organic food choices alone have surged in the last several yrs with 2013 seeing a 12% rise from the previous yr alone. Even WallyWorld is carrying Organic options. Even if buying all Organic is not desired there are still copious amounts of trail food ready choices in med to large grocery stores in every state I've hiked which is now at 38 states. Heck, a friend who walked across the Andes/S America found it not extremely hard even there to make healthier options. The excuses are on the consumers shoulders.

  4. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    White flour and refined grains are worse for you than sugar.
    Theres virtually no way to eat 4000 cal per day on trail, or even 3000, without eating a lot of things that arent good for you. Bad fats, sugar, refined flour makes up half of diet, or more. Maybe 90% for some.
    That's a pretty broad, sweeping statement based upon...
    your own poor choices. My 4000 cal diet consists of nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, dried fruit and veggies. Maybe 1000 calories of it are from items with Bad fats, sugar or refined flour - lances peanut butter crackers and trader Joes dark chocolate being the primary offenders with raisins, dried mango and apples (all unsweetened) being the primary sugar sources.

    While you may think there's virtually no way to eat a healthy 4000 cal/day backpacking diet, you would be incorrect.

  5. #25
    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-15-2017
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Age
    63
    Posts
    682

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spfleisig View Post
    Fritos and Pringles are good on the cal/gram issue.
    This is true. A significant difference between the two is the ingredient list. The Pringles list features a couple dozen items from the food chemistry industry. Fritos are corn cooked in corn oil, plus salt. That's it.

  6. #26
    Registered User Megapixel's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-16-2009
    Location
    in the woods
    Age
    45
    Posts
    614

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulWorksHard View Post
    Wouldn't eat Pro Bars, except for the nut butters, the others are high in sugar and not that high in calories.

    Pro Bar bites 190 cal , 46 g = 117 cal/ oz, 25% sugar
    Pro Bar meal 370 cal, 85 g = 123 csl/oz, 19- 27% sugar
    Pro Bar bolt 90 cal, 30 g = 85 cal/oz, 40% sugar
    Pro Bar fuel 190 cal 51 g = 106 cal/oz, 41% sugar
    Pro Bar base 220 cal, 53 = 118 cal/oz, 23% sugar
    Pro Bar base 290 cal, 70 g = 118 cal/oz, 23% sugar

    But I do like hemp seeds. My breakfast is oatmeal, raisins, chia & hemp seeds.
    Not sure of your stats, but the pro bars we use, pro bar meal are 22g of sugar. not 85 as you are quoting.

    http://www.postholer.com/ontrail
    2011 H.F.-Duncannon, Katahdin-Rangeley
    2012 Springer-Erwin



  7. #27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Megapixel View Post
    Not sure of your stats, but the pro bars we use, pro bar meal are 22g of sugar. not 85 as you are quoting.
    Reread the post. It says the bars weigh 85g. They are 19 - 27% sugar and about 123 cal/oz.

  8. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    17,753

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulWorksHard View Post
    That's a pretty broad, sweeping statement based upon...
    your own poor choices. My 4000 cal diet consists of nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, dried fruit and veggies. Maybe 1000 calories of it are from items with Bad fats, sugar or refined flour - lances peanut butter crackers and trader Joes dark chocolate being the primary offenders with raisins, dried mango and apples (all unsweetened) being the primary sugar sources.

    While you may think there's virtually no way to eat a healthy 4000 cal/day backpacking diet, you would be incorrect.

    I don't see why you're so down on sugar content of ProBar Meals Bars at 19-26 % of calories from sugar, often from the dried fruit included, BUT also from added cane sugar admittedly, when unsweetened dried raisins are around 67% of sugar calories or Trader Joe's unsulfured unsweetened dried mango are the same? I get it that excessive sugar is not wanted in a trail diet. Curious as to where you set your standard for sugar consumption on trail ACROSS ALL THAT YOU EAT?

    THX for sharing those stats that you already have Paul.

  9. #29

    Default

    How much do Pro Bars, or any other bar cost on a per pound basis? At least $10-15. Some, much more. Do you want to pay this much for sugar? Sure, raisins have a lot of sugar, but they are what, less than $3 per pound? When paying over $1 for a 1.25 or 1.5oz bar, shouldn't it be highly nutritious? That's my issue with most bars. They are poor value for the money. Full disclosure, I do eat the Kirkland nut bars which are kind bar knock-offs. 65 cents each, 15% sugar and 140 calories/oz.

    My standard is minimize, without being stupid, empty calories. I have 144 grams of sugar a day in 4000 calories, about 100 grams from dried raisins, mangos and apples. I love sugar and chocolate. What I really want to focus on is a healthy diet at a reasonable cost.

    Just for clarity, the phrase " Bad fats, sugar or refined flour " was quoting from Muddy Waters post.

  10. #30

    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,869
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    No one chooses bars or other junk because they prefer it.
    Its quick its convenient. You pay for the convenience.
    prepackaged long shelf life

    Some are really not much better than snickers either on a nutrition basis, but at least they have some fiber too.

  11. #31
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-20-2013
    Location
    Upper East Side of Texas
    Age
    73
    Posts
    8,276

    Default

    Is $5.00/pound for 2.4 ounce bars acceptable? The potassium content exceeds the sodium content. Something I look for when buying trail food. 22 grams of various sugars.
    These bars combined with the All Bran Brownies keep me going during the day at altitude.
    Keep it simple.
    Wayne


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Eddie Valiant: "That lame-brain freeway idea could only be cooked up by a toon."
    https://wayne-ayearwithbigfootandbubba.blogspot.com
    FlickrMyBookTwitSpaceFace



  12. #32
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
    Location
    Golden CO or Scottsdale AZ
    Age
    62
    Posts
    5,375
    Images
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    No one chooses bars or other junk because they prefer it....
    I respectfully disagree! A lot of research has gone into the correct fat/sugar/salt combination in packaged foods to reach the "bliss point." The stuff is addictive.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  13. #33
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    17,753

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulWorksHard View Post
    How much do Pro Bars, or any other bar cost on a per pound basis? At least $10-15. Some, much more. Do you want to pay this much for sugar? Sure, raisins have a lot of sugar, but they are what, less than $3 per pound? When paying over $1 for a 1.25 or 1.5oz bar, shouldn't it be highly nutritious? That's my issue with most bars. They are poor value for the money. Full disclosure, I do eat the Kirkland nut bars which are kind bar knock-offs. 65 cents each, 15% sugar and 140 calories/oz.

    My standard is minimize, without being stupid, empty calories. I have 144 grams of sugar a day in 4000 calories, about 100 grams from dried raisins, mangos and apples. I love sugar and chocolate. What I really want to focus on is a healthy diet at a reasonable cost.

    Just for clarity, the phrase " Bad fats, sugar or refined flour " was quoting from Muddy Waters post.

    THX Paul. Now you're throwing in $ cost. BUT that wasn't my question. I do see your pt BUT I'm DEFINITELY NOT recognizing an overall high quality of wider nutrition despite the $ cost differences comparing raisins or dried mango, both of which I enjoy, with a ProBar Meal. Other foods hence $ costs would have to be included in either dried mango or raisins to raise these single items to the cost of a ProBar Meal. Plus, I'm strongly assuming there would be added bulk and inconvenience than quickly noshing a ProBar Meal with some nuts or nut butter in the morning.


    BTW, raisins are relatively cheap. Dried mango is more expensive. Just as a suggestion, and what I do, is food cost average. That is I do NOT eat ProBars every morning but mix it up financially to lower avg costs to include whole oats which is the cheapest b'fast(and all purpose option) and add nuts, dried milk, dried fruit, a nut butter, etc.

    I certainly do agree though I also don't want to be paying very much for empty sugar calories either on trail or at home.

  14. #34
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    17,753

    Default

    Ever make your own bars for the trail?

  15. #35
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-20-2013
    Location
    Upper East Side of Texas
    Age
    73
    Posts
    8,276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Ever make your own bars for the trail?
    The brownies above and a couple other recipes in the kitchen are added to the store bought stuff for variety.
    Wayne


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Eddie Valiant: "That lame-brain freeway idea could only be cooked up by a toon."
    https://wayne-ayearwithbigfootandbubba.blogspot.com
    FlickrMyBookTwitSpaceFace



  16. #36
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    17,753

    Default

    I'm eating ProBars because oz for oz they have a much wider profile of convenient trail nutrition than oz for oz of raisins or dried mango. Yeah, for the convenience and greater nutritional profile I'll throw in some ProBars to a summer or warmer hike's food bag. My own sugar content % tops out around 20% and I'm considering the qualitative source of the sugar.

  17. #37

    Default

    ProBar Meal bars ftw - not that you can live on them when they're $3 apiece (spare me your "but I scored them on sale" stories). But packing a few of them to have as a morale boost or jumpstart to a day when you need it can not only fill your belly but your soul. 20 miles into a 24 mile day, no water to cold-soak your noodles, and sick to death of almonds and tortillas and dried fruit? Finding that one last ProBar chocolate/PB bar at the bottom of your food bag puts an instant 390(?) calories in your belly, the chocolate/sugar picks you up, and it makes those last 4 miles fly by.

  18. #38
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2017
    Location
    Pietermaritzburg, South Africa
    Age
    60
    Posts
    469

    Default

    I'm unfamiliar with ProBars. It seems to pack a nutritional value per 100 grams of 1739 kj (414 kcal), but I'm familiar with ButtaNutt (Pecan/Macadamia squeeze packs) that scream in with 2992 kg of energy for 100 grams (715 calories). Another option for the hungry.

    download.jpg

  19. #39
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    17,753

    Default

    BTW, it's incorrect to state Probars Meal costs only involve paying for sugar. There're other ingredients and nutrition in a ProBar Meal. It's called a meal for a reason. I've never eaten just raisins or dried mango and thought of them as a meal. To comparatively suggest raisins or dried mango equal the nutrition of a ProBar Meal isn't accurate. I'm willing to pay for food that I think is overall comparatively better. I haven't hit the lottery though so I'll continue to mix it up taste wise and nutritionally cost averaging. I wonder if those mentioning costs on trail apply their costs considerations universally to their hikes? That would be a shame if so as they would never experience backpacking beyond their own backyard.

  20. #40

    Default

    You don't need grains and sugars to fuel your efforts. I'll just drop this here.

    http://www.mensjournal.com/adventure...oxygen-w484387
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •