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  1. #1
    Click's Avatar
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    Default Charles Konopa - Section hiker June 6, 1964 to September 19, 1970

    I bought the two volume Hiking the Appalachian Trail last year. This year I've begun reading through some of the stories.

    So far, Mr. Konopa's adventure stands out for his use of the English language with plenty of flourishes and references to terms or 'things' that I have to stop and look up. It's a wonderful read, without the rush of point to point descriptions often in journals or stories now-a-days.

    I've begun my acquisition of gear and facts while increasing my activity level in preparation for my NOBO excursion in March of 2020: yes, I like to [finally] plan ahead. The mental preparation is what these stories help with. It could be easy to forget why I am walking. For me, the journey will be similar to noticing the differences in snowflakes - I like metaphors. I don't think a walk in the woods will be boring since I'm looking at what is here and now.

    Other hiker's stories provide inspiration to continue, and often show what they did that they won't do again. For me, THAT wisdom is a 'pay attention, Grasshopper' moment.
    Last edited by Click; 07-07-2017 at 14:41.

  2. #2
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    So far, Mr. Konopa's adventure stands out for his use of the English language with plenty of flourishes and references to terms or 'things' that I have to stop and look up. It's a wonderful read, without the rush of point to point descriptions often in journals or stories now-a-days.

    I've begun my acquisition of gear and facts while increasing my activity level in preparation for my NOBO excursion in March of 2020...The mental preparation is what these stories help with. It could be easy to forge why I am walking. For me, the journey will be similar to noticing the difference in snowflakes - I like metaphors. I don't think a walk in the woods will be boring since I'm looking at what is here and now.

    Other hiker's stories provide inspiration to continue, and often show what they did that they won't do again. For me, THAT wisdom is a 'pay attention, Grasshopper' moment.[/QUOTE]

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Click View Post
    ...So far, Mr. Konopa's adventure stands out for his use of the English language with plenty of flourishes and references to terms or 'things' that I have to stop and look up. It's a wonderful read, without the rush of point to point descriptions often in journals or stories now-a-days.

    I've begun my acquisition of gear and facts while increasing my activity level in preparation for my NOBO excursion in March of 2020: yes, I like to [finally] plan ahead. The mental preparation is what these stories help with. It could be easy to forge why I am walking. For me, the journey will be similar to noticing the difference in snowflakes - I like metaphors. I don't think a walk in the woods will be boring since I'm looking at what is here and now.

    Other hiker's stories provide inspiration to continue, and often show what they did that they won't do again. For me, THAT wisdom is a 'pay attention, Grasshopper' moment.

    Wow if you actually journey the AT similarly as noticing the differences between every snowflake you're going to have one heck of a journey.

  4. #4
    Registered User cneill13's Avatar
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    Click. I too own both volumes. They are a true treasure. Thanks for highlighting them and Konopa.
    Last edited by Farr Away; 07-09-2017 at 07:50. Reason: personal attack

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Wow if you actually journey the AT similarly as noticing the differences between every snowflake you're going to have one heck of a journey.
    Ha! Yes. Just don't bump into me when I'm stooped over looking at something ....
    Also, I tend to look a clouds a lot - hopefully when I'm NOT near a cliff or some other open air space.
    My hike won't be a rush [I'll be retired] so as long as I get to BSP before it closes for year I'm good.
    Last edited by Click; 07-07-2017 at 17:57.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Click View Post
    I bought the two volume Hiking the Appalachian Trail last year. This year I've begun reading through some of the stories.
    If I could only have one (set) book(s) about the AT, that two-volume set would be it! There are a few other very fine AT books, but none that match the variety, depth, and history.
    ye shall not pollute the land wherein ye are: ... Defile not therefore the land which ye shall inhabit..... Numbers 35

    www.MeetUp.com/NashvilleBackpacker

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  7. #7

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    I too was weened on this two volume set. I actually used to carry a single volume checked out from the App State University library on my roving NC backpacking trips. One of my faves was 3 time thruhiker Dorothy Laker who once stashed her pack in the woods and hitched into town and couldn't find it when she hitched back.

    Another was the ex-green beret guy who did the whole trail in around 79 days but blew out his boots along the way. With ragged boots he stumbled onto a group of SF soldiers from Bragg doing field exercises adjacent to the AT and one of them removed his boots and gave them to him.

  8. #8
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    Click BRAVO for you that you're approaching your AT thru-hike not always in the common thru hiker mindset of go go go gotta be somewhere else doing something else mindset. So refreshing when it's become more accustomed to hear about a publicly declared speed or FKT attempt.

    TU for taking the above post in context.

    Enjoy your journey. It's a BIG AT.

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