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Thread: Durable Eyewear

  1. #1

    Question Durable Eyewear

    I wear prescription eye glasses and am notorious for breaking the frames and scratching the lenses. I'm looking for something that is durable and, if possible, relatively inexpensive. I prefer thicker plastic frames over thin metal frames, but will consider anything as long as it is "unbreakable". Another feature that would be nice is some sort of clip on sunglasses so that I don't have to carry two pairs of glasses. A clip-on that is made for the frame would be ideal (something like the Zenni Optical magnetic clip-ons - I don't know their quality and durability, but they look cool to me). I would like to hear from anyone who has had good luck with any brands that fit this bill.

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    go to a decent, like a mom&pop optometrist. They could suggest some "sport" type frames. There are scratch treatments for the lenses. They work for normal wear. Not sure how that would be on a trail. Glass lenses won't scratch, but can be heavy.

    Tell them what your needs are and let them show you options, pro's and con's of each option.
    For a couple of bucks, get a weird haircut and waste your life away Bryan Adams....
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    Registered User Sandy of PA's Avatar
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    Transition lenses beat sunglasses hands down, nothing to lose or break. You can get them in just about any style frame.

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    Flexon titanium frames would be very hard to brake, and lightweight. They are, of course, metal. +1 on the transitions, too, assuming you are not in snow or other extreme light conditions.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

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    I have Titan frames (Austrian make) since many years, they were sold to be "unbreakable".
    Can't count how many times they broke, most of the time within the 5-yr-warranty.

    Up to my experience, it is more important to have a nice carrying case for the glasses, one that you really like to use, then even the cheapest glasses won't break.
    And always carry spare glasses.

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    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
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    See if these frames would help.
    Blackheart

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    Quote Originally Posted by rhjanes View Post
    go to a decent, like a mom&pop optometrist. They could suggest some "sport" type frames. There are scratch treatments for the lenses. They work for normal wear. Not sure how that would be on a trail. Glass lenses won't scratch, but can be heavy.
    Tell them what your needs are and let them show you options, pro's and con's of each option.
    +1 on this advice. What you describe is what people have sought for a very long time, basically indestructible, scratch proof eyewear. Unfortunately lenses will scratch (even with protective coatings) with tree branches, sand whipping, and wiping off condensation with dirty cotton. Frames have gotten more pliable, but you'll pay a premium for those. However a good optometrist will be able to get you close to what you are looking for.

    My experiences with clip on sunglasses has not been good over the years. Handy in the car and light use for errands, etc. But in the back country I have not found them all that handy due to stability on the glasses (coming off in wind, branch strikes, etc), they were easily lost in low light places, and did not suffer much of what I would consider routine use on the trail well. Some years ago I got a separate pair of sunglasses that I find are much lighter than my regular glasses with the clip-on type and are cooler in the sun. I keep the pair I am not wearing in a pretty sturdy eyeglasses case that has survived all kinds of attempts to crush it, but has worn very well. FWIW

  8. #8

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    I also have had lots of trouble with wire frame glasses with them breaking or lens falling out. My current pair of glasses have cheap black plastic nerdy frames from Walmart. I've had them for several years now with no issues.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

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    I've used unbreakable metal frames for myself and kids.

    One daughter did manage to break a pair by bending it back and back and forth over a hundred times a day for over a month. She decided on a different nervous habit after that.

    I've been thinking of trying transition lenses again. Been years. Last time I wore them they were a glass only thing.

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    Indestructible titanium, transitions [except for snow] are not cheap but I never have to worry about breakage or sunglasses. My experience with clip-ons-they left a permanent 'smudge' where they touch the plastic (I could SEE them!).

    Definitely carry a backup of any of your past glasses, just in case.

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    Mom and pop optometrists have thier roll, but Costco has a great deal to offer at prices that are hard to beat.

    As an added bonus, they are very good about replacing lenses that have been scratched (or whose coatings have been damaged by deet) under warantee.

    My experience, anyway.

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    +1 on titanium type....I've used the Flexon type for a decade. They take a lot of abuse. I also got the transition lens's (they darken) and they are very nice. I have magnetic type add-ons for "sun".....but those seem to be going out of favor AND would be easy to lose or break.
    my mom&Pop shop, also offers a 2 year scratch deal. After about a year or 18 months, they just order the same len's for me. I stop back by and in 5 minutes, they swap them out.....
    For a couple of bucks, get a weird haircut and waste your life away Bryan Adams....
    Hammock hangs are where you go into the woods to meet men you've only known on the internet so you can sit around a campfire to swap sewing tips and recipes. - sargevining on HF

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    I'm with Leo on this as a reading glasses user on and off trail. It's as much about how you care and use your eyewear that leads to durability. Everything man makes I can think of can be destroyed.

    I regret ever initially having taken reading glasses when offered as now I expect to have them all the time for reading despite having vision tested several times with tests saying my excellent vision has never deteriorated.

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    I'm one of the few with a bad experience with photosensitive lenses. I wore them for years but found that when I removed them my eyes had become overly sensitive to bright daylight. I had been overprotected. Moreover, they didn't get dark enough to equal dedicated sunglasses. Perhaps the products are better now, or I may just be special�� But I won't go back even for the convenience photosensitive lenses offer.
    "It goes to show you never can tell." - Charles Edward Anderson Berry

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    When I first tried them they only worked on glass and came in only one color.

    Now they work on a mulitude of surfaces and come in three colors.

    They also have a fairly broad range of how much they block.

    Well worth revisting. I just did and ordered some transition lenses.

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    Contacts? You can get disposable and replace when needed. I don't recommend my schedule, one every six months, but you can try out as you wish.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredt4 View Post
    Contacts? You can get disposable and replace when needed. I don't recommend my schedule, one every six months, but you can try out as you wish.
    You sound like me, a box of contacts last me 2-3 years.
    Blackheart

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    I've never been in the habit of wearing sunglasses but recently got my first pair of prescription sunglasses. My regular glasses have progressive bifocals which are good since on a daily basis I have to be able to focus at lots of distances. But I found when hiking, I didn't the fact that the ground in front of me (viewed the the bottom of my progressive lenses) was always out of focus. I find when hiking, I almost always need distance vision with an occasional need to see things up-close (watch, map). Rarely do I need that intermediate focus. My regular glasses have custom fit sunglasses that are held on my magnets, which are nice, but they let so much light in the side, they often don't help much. So I got prescription sunglasses that wrap around the side for better protection when the sun or glare is off to the side, and they have a narrow bi-focal at the bottom for map reading. Otherwise, they are just for distance vision. Good for driving and hiking. However they lenses are thin plastic lenses, so I suspect I will need to treat them gently. Also, I got them with anti-glare coatings, but not polarized. My polarized lenses make it really hard or impossible to read digital liquid crystal displays (camera, watch, dashboard) which often polarize the wrong way to be seen with my polarized lenses.

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    a little off topic, since they aren't prescription....
    But I ordered a set of readers a while back, and it dawned on me that it might appeal to other presbyopes here....

    Visualites #1
    I ordered the clear, but they have different colors and different styles
    A frameless lens with plastic 'frame'. The plastic is very flexible, you can almost tie it in a knot....(not that this would be good for them, but you could) and extremely light weight
    They have held up very well for me and I like them a lot. I like them so much that after I lost my first pair (the wind on a cruise ship blew them off my head), I ordered two more before I even got home.

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