Page 1 of 12 1 2 3 4 5 11 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 228
  1. #1
    Registered User JPritch's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-03-2017
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Age
    40
    Posts
    486

    Default Shelters Only for Thru-Hikers?

    I read a review of a local hike the other day, and one reviewer scolded non-thru hikers for using shelters during the season.

    Here is the quote:
    Side note... if you are backpacking this loop in summer. Please leave the shelters for AT Thru Hikers, I noticed too many "weekenders" using the shelters to sleep in. poor form.

    I'd never heard of this unwritten rule before, and IMO if somebody had the gall to question my use of a shelter in-season as a section hiker, I'd tell them where to shove their opinion. But that's me.

    I can see not filling up an entire shelter with your youth/boy scout/church group etc..., but for individual hikers...come on.

    Curious what you all think.

  2. #2

    Default

    Any hiker has the right to use a shelter.

  3. #3

    Default

    The shelter is only full when the last person who needs it is inside. "thruhikers only" is not a thing.

  4. #4
    Registered User Tennessee Viking's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-10-2007
    Location
    Morganton, North Carolina
    Age
    41
    Posts
    3,469
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    242

    Default

    Most experienced thru-hikers will prefer to camp away from shelters.

    And how do you identify thru-hikers from weekenders?
    ''Tennessee Viking'
    Mountains to Sea Trail Maintainer
    Former TEHCC (AT) Maintainer
    Falls Lake Trail: 2011

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-20-2002
    Location
    Damascus, Virginia
    Age
    60
    Posts
    31,110

    Default

    first come, first served. period. there is nothing special about a thru-hiker

  6. #6
    Registered User lonehiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-18-2005
    Location
    Cheyenne, WY
    Age
    55
    Posts
    1,346

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee Viking View Post
    And how do you identify thru-hikers from weekenders?
    In short, and because I need 10 characters, smell.
    Lonehiker

  7. #7

    Default

    bs. plus thru-hikers are so badass they can camp anywhere. :-)





    Quote Originally Posted by JPritch View Post
    I read a review of a local hike the other day, and one reviewer scolded non-thru hikers for using shelters during the season.

    Here is the quote:
    Side note... if you are backpacking this loop in summer. Please leave the shelters for AT Thru Hikers, I noticed too many "weekenders" using the shelters to sleep in. poor form.

    I'd never heard of this unwritten rule before, and IMO if somebody had the gall to question my use of a shelter in-season as a section hiker, I'd tell them where to shove their opinion. But that's me.

    I can see not filling up an entire shelter with your youth/boy scout/church group etc..., but for individual hikers...come on.

    Curious what you all think.
    Let me go

  8. #8
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
    Join Date
    12-13-2004
    Location
    Essex, Vermont
    Age
    64
    Posts
    2,259

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Wolf View Post
    first come, first served. period. there is nothing special about a thru-hiker
    exactly that

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee Viking View Post
    Most experienced thru-hikers will prefer to camp away from shelters.
    And how do you identify thru-hikers from weekenders?
    Actually, experienced thru hikers love shelters, especially if it's raining or going to rain - and that has happened a lot this year. So, coming to a shelter late in the day and finding it full of some camp group or weekend warriors, is a significant disappointment.

    It doesn't take too long for a thru-hiker to develop a distinct look (and smell) which makes them easy to identify. But unfortunately, that status doesn't grant you any special privileges in terms of shelter space. It can get you a discount with the AMC through the Whites, but that's about it.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  10. #10

    Default

    You should post the link so they can be corrected.

  11. #11
    Wanna-be hiker trash
    Join Date
    03-05-2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Age
    38
    Posts
    6,861
    Images
    78

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Wolf View Post
    first come, first served. period. there is nothing special about a thru-hiker
    This. Every year there are a few entitled schmucks that make claims like this that make all thru hikers look bad.

    I was out in VT doing a section last week. On my first night as I got to a busy shelter area one of the first things out of a thru hikers mouth was "It looks like it's gonna rain, we can make room for you in the shelter if you need it." That's exactly how it should work.
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  12. #12

    Default

    I am more than happy to let the thru hikers (or anyone else for that matter) have the shelters, while I camp somewhere nicer, with significantly less mice!

    But it is first come first serve.

  13. #13

    Default

    Perhaps someone could relay the "first come, first served" concept to UGPC. Last year we were told that we'd have to give up our bunks if thru-hikers came in late. Apparently the new management of this shelter by the AMC (?) did in fact indicate it's only for thru-hikers.


    I went back and checked, and am happy to say that the description has been expanded to include section hikers.

    http://www.outdoors.org/lodging-camp...oose/index.cfm
    Last edited by Teacher & Snacktime; 07-17-2017 at 18:08.
    ...the maddest of all is to see life as it is, and not as it should be. Cervantes

  14. #14
    Registered User soilman's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-29-2010
    Location
    Chillicothe, OH
    Age
    64
    Posts
    488

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    Actually, experienced thru hikers love shelters, especially if it's raining or going to rain - and that has happened a lot this year. So, coming to a shelter late in the day and finding it full of some camp group or weekend warriors, is a significant disappointment.

    It doesn't take too long for a thru-hiker to develop a distinct look (and smell) which makes them easy to identify. But unfortunately, that status doesn't grant you any special privileges in terms of shelter space. It can get you a discount with the AMC through the Whites, but that's about it.
    Yes, some thru hikers think they are entitled to special privileges. I stopped at the Chatfield shelter for the night and the shelter was nearly full with mostly thru hikers. Just before dark a hiker came in and declared "I am a thru hiker and hiked 20 miles today. Make room."
    More walking, less talking.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-18-2010
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    43
    Posts
    3,133
    Images
    1

    Default

    this never ends well when i interject this into these discussions-

    it depends on the definition of "thru hiker."

    while not often spoken off, printed, cited or i imagine enforced, in some places, most notably SNP, there is in fact a rule that basically says someone who parks their car, hikes a mile or two into the woods to a nearby shelter with the intention of staying there a night or two and then turning around and hiking back to their car is technically not allowed to do so. the shelters are intended for people who are "hiking through."

    i don't think many people understand the reasoning behind this rule or agree with it in the least, even those amongst us who would never do something like this, but as someone who has more than once come across groups of people who have commandeered a shelter that was within an easy mile or two of a road and turned it into their own private weekend vacation getaway (and yes, ive had such people pretty much directly tell me that the shelter was "theirs" and i couldnt stay at it.) i understand fully and agree with such rules. the shelters are for people doing end to end hikes. not for lazy quasi car campers.

    i sense perhaps a similar rule is in place wherever this was and one or more people grossly misunderstood or misapplied it.

  16. #16
    Registered User soilman's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-29-2010
    Location
    Chillicothe, OH
    Age
    64
    Posts
    488

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher & Snacktime View Post
    Perhaps someone could relay the "first come, first served" concept to UGPC. Last year we were told that we'd have to give up our bunks if thru-hikers came in late. Apparently the new management of this shelter by the AMC (?) did in fact indicate it's only for thru-hikers.


    I went back and checked, and am happy to say that the description has been expanded to include section hikers.

    http://www.outdoors.org/lodging-camp...oose/index.cfm
    When I stayed there in 2010 there definitely was a bias in favor of thru hikers. The bunks were not full but the non-thru hikers were all on tent pads. That evening another caretaker hiked in to visit with the current caretaker and brought about 6 half gallons of ice cream for the thru hikers. There were only 4 of us thru hiking staying at the cabin. There was no way we could eat all that ice cream. After we had our fill they called in the non-thru hikers to clean it up. At breakfast the thru hikers ate first.
    More walking, less talking.

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-12-2015
    Location
    Newark, DE
    Age
    60
    Posts
    452

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdoczi View Post
    this never ends well when i interject this into these discussions-

    it depends on the definition of "thru hiker."

    while not often spoken off, printed, cited or i imagine enforced, in some places, most notably SNP, there is in fact a rule that basically says someone who parks their car, hikes a mile or two into the woods to a nearby shelter with the intention of staying there a night or two and then turning around and hiking back to their car is technically not allowed to do so. the shelters are intended for people who are "hiking through."

    i don't think many people understand the reasoning behind this rule or agree with it in the least, even those amongst us who would never do something like this, but as someone who has more than once come across groups of people who have commandeered a shelter that was within an easy mile or two of a road and turned it into their own private weekend vacation getaway (and yes, ive had such people pretty much directly tell me that the shelter was "theirs" and i couldnt stay at it.) i understand fully and agree with such rules. the shelters are for people doing end to end hikes. not for lazy quasi car campers.

    i sense perhaps a similar rule is in place wherever this was and one or more people grossly misunderstood or misapplied it.
    And the PA game lands are exactly opposite that. If you are out and back from your car you are only allowed to stay at/near shelters. Point to point hikers are allowed to disperse camp, but not out and back hikers. The purpose of this is to keep them from making a camp close to a road and have a party.

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-18-2010
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    43
    Posts
    3,133
    Images
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SkeeterPee View Post
    And the PA game lands are exactly opposite that. If you are out and back from your car you are only allowed to stay at/near shelters. Point to point hikers are allowed to disperse camp, but not out and back hikers. The purpose of this is to keep them from making a camp close to a road and have a party.
    but if a shelter is near a road... theyre allowed to have a party there???

  19. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-12-2015
    Location
    Newark, DE
    Age
    60
    Posts
    452

    Default

    probably depends on what you mean by a party. For the majority of shelters are not that near the road, but some have other lanes/roads close enough that people come into party. I've move on when encountering an obvious weekend party crowd.

  20. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-18-2010
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    43
    Posts
    3,133
    Images
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SkeeterPee View Post
    probably depends on what you mean by a party. For the majority of shelters are not that near the road, but some have other lanes/roads close enough that people come into party. I've move on when encountering an obvious weekend party crowd.
    where PA game lands start and end is not something i'm near to clear on but i can think of a number of shelters in PA that would be potential spots for the kind of people i referenced in my first post in this thread and a rule encouraging rather than stopping that behavior seems... odd. i guess in a sense its a lesser of two evils when compared to dispersed camping of that nature.

    i generally move on too. doesnt mean that it isnt annoying and that rules against it (even if they are, in the end, pointless) are wrong.

    i once came upon a family of about 5 or 6 on a friday night at the hemlocks in MA (a shelter with a listed capacity of 10 that can probably hold 12 or 14 easily). when i approached the shelter and asked them where water was they proceeded to ask me where i was staying and offered many suggestions (all of them under the broad category of somewhere else) never once coming anywhere near suggesting there was room in the shelter if i wanted it.

    on a different occasion i stopped at either seth warner or congdon in VT, just to get water, and was greeted by some obvious locals (it was only 2 people if i recall correctly) who categorically told me without any provocation that i could not stay there.

    at dick's dome in VA i happened upon what was obviously a young college or perhaps even HS couple who thought of the shelter as their private spot in the woods.

    at wilbur clearing i happened upon about 3 locals who had probably 4 or 5 growling, snarling dogs chained up (literally chains, not the kind made for dogs) at the shelter.

    none of these activities is covered by "first come first served" these people don't belong at the shelters. is there truly a way to police this? of course not. that doesnt mean it should be implicitly allowed by not even attempting to make it at all clear that it isn't appropriate.

    in the case of the family at hemlocks, they might have honestly not thought anything of it and may have acted differently if they understood the real purpose for the structure they were in's existence.

Page 1 of 12 1 2 3 4 5 11 ... LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •