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  1. #21
    Registered User kestral's Avatar
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    Could a pressure relief valve be purchased separately and attached aftermarket? Yes
    Would this void any factory warranty and possibility create a shelter IED. Yes
    Has anyone ventured there?

    the titanium 8 oz version with safe pressure release valve would be a definite possible buy, but the 2.2 lb version is too heavy for me to consider at this time. Perhaps some of you engineer types could cobble it together safely.

    Thoughts?

  2. #22

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    Here is an update found on Amazon:

    Question: Does this come with some sort of pressure regulator as seen on youtube?

    Answer: Keith Titanium Multifunctional Cooker has two versions, standard and upgraded. The only difference is that the upgraded version has the pressure regulator you mentioned. The upgraded version is for regions with altitude higher than 13,000 feet. The standard version has been tested on mountains higher than 13,000 feet. Even though the standard version is very popular now, we won't produce the upgraded version until 2019 because we think the market demand for it is very low. Thanks! By KEITH TITANIUM USA SELLER on January 30, 2017

    https://www.amazon.com/Keith-Titaniu.../dp/B01N0E2LT1

    Click on the "eight answered questions" as seen in photo:

    Capture.JPG
    Last edited by zelph; 07-31-2017 at 16:27.

  3. #23
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    I don't know anything about cooking lentils
    but I think I would look into two things...
    1) soaking tomorrows meals while I sleep...or perhaps soaking the evening's meal while I hike....
    2) regular Ti pot, with a rock sitting on the lid.

  4. #24
    Registered User kestral's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=zelph;2162537]Here is an update found on Amazon:

    Question: Does this come with some sort of pressure regulator as seen on youtube?

    Answer: Keith Titanium Multifunctional Cooker has two versions, standard and upgraded. The only difference is that the upgraded version has the pressure regulator you mentioned. The upgraded version is for regions with altitude higher than 13,000 feet. The standard version has been tested on mountains higher than 13,000 feet. Even though the standard version is very popular now, we won't produce the upgraded version until 2019 because we think the market demand for it is very low. Thanks! By KEITH TITANIUM USA SELLER on January 30, 2017

  5. #25
    Registered User kestral's Avatar
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    Thank you for above info. Guess I'll wait another couple years .

    while linking above saw this really inexpensive set someone might be interested in. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01E02ITE2...ding=UTF8&th=1

  6. #26

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    Quick Science Lesson: Water and the Boiling Point
    Under normal heating conditions, water cannot heat past its boiling point, which is 212 degrees Fahrenheit (100 degrees Celsius). Any hotter than that, and the water converts to steam. Thus, as long as liquid water remains in the pot, the water will absorb the heat from the heating mechanism, not the rice. Because the water cannot get any hotter than 212 degrees, the pot cannot get hotter than 212 degrees.

    From eHow


    http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4674349...oker-work.html

  7. #27
    Registered User Kaptainkriz's Avatar
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    That's the BOMB!
    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    There is a Titanium cooker out there for rice :
    Plaid is fast! Ticks suck, literally...
    Follow my hiking adventures: https://www.youtube.com/user/KrizAkoni
    Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/alphagalhikes/

  8. #28
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Random idea that has been floating around in my brain for awhile.
    Take a normal backpacking style pot with a lipped lid. A continuous lip around the edge of the lid. No spout or other opening.
    Put water and food to be cooked in the pot and start the stove. Place a stone on the lid. Actually, place 3 stones evenly spaced on the lid. In theory, the pressure and temperature in the pot will rise. Experiment and see if the food cooks faster and saves fuel.
    You're welcome!
    Wayne


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  9. #29
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    blw2 stole my idea.
    Grinning.
    Wayne


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  10. #30

  11. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    Quick Science Lesson: Water and the Boiling Point
    Under normal heating conditions, water cannot heat past its boiling point, which is 212 degrees Fahrenheit (100 degrees Celsius). Any hotter than that, and the water converts to steam. Thus, as long as liquid water remains in the pot, the water will absorb the heat from the heating mechanism, not the rice. Because the water cannot get any hotter than 212 degrees, the pot cannot get hotter than 212 degrees.

    From eHow


    http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4674349...oker-work.html
    The boiling temperature of water is a function of pressure. At sea level water boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit. At higher altitudes, where the pressure is less, it boils at a lower temperature. In a pressure cooker, the pressure of the steam over the water surface allows the water to get to a higher temperature than 212.

  12. #32
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Gran


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    Eddie Valiant: "That lame-brain freeway idea could only be cooked up by a toon."
    https://wayne-ayearwithbigfootandbubba.blogspot.com
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  13. #33
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Gran


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Sorry. Fumble fingers.
    Wayne


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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  14. #34
    Registered User kestral's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gpburdelljr View Post
    The boiling temperature of water is a function of pressure. At sea level water boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit. At higher altitudes, where the pressure is less, it boils at a lower temperature. In a pressure cooker, the pressure of the steam over the water surface allows the water to get to a higher temperature than 212.
    Thank you for explaining for me. I have used pressure cooker in past in the house to greatly speed up cooking process for beans, bone broth, chili etc . A light weight version is enviable for backpacking because you can cook regular rice, lentils or beans in much less time. Basically rice and lentils brought to boil under pressure and turned off and "cozied" will yield cooked poduct in 5-10 min rather than simmer 15-30 min for same. Not sure of exact time without using and experimenting with product, but I expect savings in time and fuel would be substantial, to a point where instant or cooked then dried would not be required. This would allow one to use non specialized foods at a cost saving and easier obtaining. Would love to putter with one of those little buggers. But then I like to cook.

  15. #35
    Registered User kestral's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Random idea that has been floating around in my brain for awhile.
    Take a normal backpacking style pot with a lipped lid. A continuous lip around the edge of the lid. No spout or other opening.
    Put water and food to be cooked in the pot and start the stove. Place a stone on the lid. Actually, place 3 stones evenly spaced on the lid. In theory, the pressure and temperature in the pot will rise. Experiment and see if the food cooks faster and saves fuel.
    You're welcome!
    Wayne


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Wayne, I get your idea, seems like a good idea, just don't like the possibility of it blowing up and shooting superheated molten lava (lentil) over me and bunk mates. If a pressure valve could be obtained I might try it.

    When I worked in er a lot of stories started with "seemed like a good idea", often after a few drinks with the guys. A couple real bad 'frozen turkey in the deep fryer we just bought at Walmart' incidents.

    Thanks though.

  16. #36

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    give attention to video at 0:48 to see thermometer placed into lid hole and observe amount of steaming coming out. The pot is under some serious pressure.


  17. #37

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by kestral View Post
    Thank you for explaining for me. I have used pressure cooker in past in the house to greatly speed up cooking process for beans, bone broth, chili etc . A light weight version is enviable for backpacking because you can cook regular rice, lentils or beans in much less time. Basically rice and lentils brought to boil under pressure and turned off and "cozied" will yield cooked poduct in 5-10 min rather than simmer 15-30 min for same. Not sure of exact time without using and experimenting with product, but I expect savings in time and fuel would be substantial, to a point where instant or cooked then dried would not be required. This would allow one to use non specialized foods at a cost saving and easier obtaining. Would love to putter with one of those little buggers. But then I like to cook.
    I cannot find the Keith Pressure Cooker anywhere on line, not even on the Keith site
    The rice steamer is $100, which is very expensive for me and only has a to the lid volume of 900ml

    The Hawkins 2 liter pot is tried and tested as safe
    It take three minutes to boil, then a minute to pressure
    Hawkins says to take it off the flame and let it depressurize
    So I get a full cooked vegetarian meal for and extra one minute of fuel
    (Type 2 Diabetes, I need to eat complex carbohydrates like lentils with the longer cooking brown rice or buckwheat)

    So I will save weight on fuel for long distance
    Get almost instant nutritional meals
    But do I want to carry a 1 kg pot instead of 300 g

  19. #39

  20. #40

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