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Thread: Newbie question

  1. #1
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    Question Newbie question

    Hi guys,

    I looooove to walk so the next step (hiking) is a no-brainer.

    Living in Australia there are many places to go for long hikes and gain experiences before I hop on the plane to the US for the Appalachian Trail.

    At this stage I am planning my first longer hike here in Australia and the more you get away from the coast and to the outback the hotter the days and the colder the nights (desert like). I am not sure how you guys are dealing with that in terms of hiking gear? Obviously I do not want to hike carrying too much weight, but I also do not want to freeze to death at night.

    Any suggestions?

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    Registered User mudsocks's Avatar
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    A quality down top quilt or sleeping bag. It's light and warm. A reflective sleeping pad. Going to bed on a full stomach.

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk

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    Registered User Pastor Bryon's Avatar
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    Separate clothes to sleep in. If you sleep in the same clothes you hiked in that day, they will have moisture in them which can impact your body temp significantly. I find that if I am stopping for the day and the sun is setting and the temps are cooling fairly rapidly that I need to change clothes soon. Warm, dry clothes will be important after you have finished setting up camp for the night.

  4. #4

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    A base layer to sleep in will keep your bag/quilt cleaner, let you sleep dry and adds some warmth. A good one can be very light.

    It is easy to get weight creep here, but it is also easy to get a lot of flexibility here.

    Some base layer combinations can add twenty degrees to the temperature your sleep system can handle.

    and they work better than bag liners, while fitting into the same purpose. If you have a light one and a fleece one you can have a lot of flexibility (though you want to only carry one of them depending on the weather you expect).
    Last edited by Ethesis; 08-13-2017 at 11:55.

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    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    The climate along the AT is very humid. Soggy even.
    Long sections are quite high. 5,000 to 6,000+ feet. Temperatures drop with elevation gain.
    The east coast of the USA is more like the South Island of New Zealand than Australia.
    March - May are cold to cool. June - August are warm to miserable. September and October begin to cool down.
    Wayne


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    Gosh guys - you rock! :-)
    So many good suggestions!

    I was thinking to take a super-light hammock and put my sleeping bag in there, just do not like the thought of sleeping on the ground with all the snakes and creepy-crawlies around.

    I guess I have to practise to get in and out a bit though. Getting into the hammock is not a problem, but getting into the sleeping bag in the hammock sounds adventurous lol

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    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    You are going from bad to worse.
    Hammock Forums is your friend.
    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/content.php
    Sleeping bag on an insulated foundation of some type on the ground. The creepy and crawling things won't come near you.
    Too quilt plus under quilt in the hammock.
    Stay warm. Have fun.
    Wayne


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    "Lately it occurs to me What a long, strange trip it's been." Grateful Dead

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    haha - what about the snakes?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunny2000 View Post
    haha - what about the snakes?
    I understand your snakes are far more dangerous than ours. If you have trees where you hike, A hammock is really quite easy to use. Use one with a bug net and a simple tarp (2.5X3 metres, or 8x10 feet) and an sleeping bag plus underquilt and you should sleep well. I suspect you can get better snake info where you are. Good travels.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

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    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunny2000 View Post
    haha - what about the snakes?
    Which end of the AT are you starting at? If you're southbound, it's probably comforting to know that there aren't any venomous snakes in Maine. So you're good for 500 km before you have to even think about the issue.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by DownEaster View Post
    Which end of the AT are you starting at? If you're southbound, it's probably comforting to know that there aren't any venomous snakes in Maine. So you're good for 500 km before you have to even think about the issue.
    Note the OP

    "At this stage I am planning my first longer hike here in Australia and the more you get away from the coast and to the outback the hotter the days and the colder the nights (desert like). I am not sure how you guys are dealing with that in terms of hiking gear? Obviously I do not want to hike carrying too much weight, but I also do not want to freeze to death at night."
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  12. #12
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    So you are worried about snakes and creepy crawlies in Australia? There isnt as much of a worry about those kinda critters here in the states, at least on the East Coast.

    If you are desert hiking in Australia, same as desert hiking here in the states, cold nights, hot days. Can use a quilt for the expected low temps with a good, insulated air mattress or sleep pad, dress in light layers, keep your skin covered, wear a sun hat during the day, warm hat at night.

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    Thank you guys :-)

    I really appreciate your input. Yes, training here in OZ first before doing the AT.

    I've watched a few Youtube videos and one said - light weight hammock, under-quilt, sleeping bag and tarp. Basically what you guys said as well :-)

    I'll do so more research, there are so many things to consider! I hope I am not bothering you with all my questions.

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    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Training in Oz will prepare you for a NOBO hike on either the Pacific Crest Trail or the Continental Divide Trail.
    Good luck.
    Wayne


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    "Lately it occurs to me What a long, strange trip it's been." Grateful Dead

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