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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ505 View Post
    Well and then there is homemade Boston Brown Bread, which seems to be designed to be made in a coffee can. I gather it's kind of similar though. Not sure if you can legally make it outside Boston . And yes, Logan bread does have an interesting origin! Btw, there is a reference in recipes for Brown Bread of Johnny cake flour. I have read (not sure where) that Johnny cake was a mispronunciation of "journey cake".
    My grandmother made it in Iowa, and she didn’t go to jail, so I think it is legal to make it outside of Boston. I had a can of brown bread on my first backpacking trip. We were headed to Mount Le Conte in the Smokys. Sitting on the edge of the trail, we opened the can and then slathered on some butter. Maybe that’s why I like backpacking. ??? A backpacking group I used to hike with would bring fruitcake on hikes, and make a little hot buttered rum to put on the pieces of fruitcake. Geeze I miss that group.

  2. #62
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    My grandmother made it in Iowa, and she didn’t go to jail, so I think it is legal to make it outside of Boston.

    I'm not sure, but the statute of limitations has probably run by now.
    "It goes to show you never can tell." - Charles Edward Anderson Berry

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Grouse View Post
    My grandmother made it in Iowa, and she didn’t go to jail, so I think it is legal to make it outside of Boston.

    I'm not sure, but the statute of limitations has probably run by now.
    I laughed out loud at that. Your lawyer skills would surely keep her out of jail. Dang I miss her bread, and even more, her meatloaf. That should have been illegal because it was so good. Back to the brown bread. :-)

  4. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pringles View Post
    My grandmother made it in Iowa, and she didnít go to jail, so I think it is legal to make it outside of Boston. I had a can of brown bread on my first backpacking trip. We were headed to Mount Le Conte in the Smokys. Sitting on the edge of the trail, we opened the can and then slathered on some butter. Maybe thatís why I like backpacking. ??? A backpacking group I used to hike with would bring fruitcake on hikes, and make a little hot buttered rum to put on the pieces of fruitcake. Geeze I miss that group.
    Quote Originally Posted by Pringles View Post
    I laughed out loud at that. Your lawyer skills would surely keep her out of jail. Dang I miss her bread, and even more, her meatloaf. That should have been illegal because it was so good. Back to the brown bread. :-)
    Oh man! you guys have got me laughing. That reminds me I just found my Nana's handwritten recipe for her fruit cake, along with the Crisco sauce she would make to serve over it. She would serve it with the sauce and sliced bananas.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  5. #65
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    I am afraid the writing is on the wall for the B&M factory, its a old antiquated factory sitting on probably the most valuable piece of real estate left in Portland Maine. its on a point with a big bay on one side and the Portland inner harbor on the other. One of these days the owners will decide the check for the real estate is worth more than the sales of beans. It will be sad day as when they blow the pots and the wind is right the area smells of warm baked beans.

  6. #66

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    Dont worry,as long as the brand or the products they make are still of value,those labels,processes, and equipment can easily be sold to other companies in the same industry and manufactured elsewhere.It happens all the time as the processed foods industry has undergone massive consolidation in the last few decades.

    BTW,I did order some of the raisin bread as I have never seen it locally and it is the closest thing I could find to what we used to have down here which was Dromedary Date Nut Roll which disappeared about 20 years ago because demand did not sustain it's existence.

  7. #67
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    I have seen videos of the factory, the equipment is circa 1913.https://www.wmtw.com/article/hometow...beans/10296658 I dont think anyone would ever consider moving the equipment. The logical approach is sell the trademark to one of the many "steam bean" companies. Most of the competitors put the raw beans and ingredients in the cans and then steam them to cook the product then label them. B&M bakes them in bean pots and then when cooked switches over to modern gear to package them.

    Baked Bean Hole Beans are a Maine tradition, there are quite a few rural summer events in Maine that feature bean pot beans made by burying a big cast iron pot full of beans and fixings over night in a pit that was lined with rocks and heated up with firewood. Serve them up the next day with the local red dyed natural casing hot dogs, Jordan Snappers, and some Humpty Dumpty Potato Chips and "that's some darn fine eating" (to be said with a pronounced Maine accent). Sadly Humpty Dumpty potato chips did shut down and sell their trademarks to a Canadian firm and the biggest local red hot dog maker, Jordan, in the region also went out of business 20 years ago and sold their trademark. Like B&M their factory in Portland was worth as much as the business. Some trivia is the Percival Baxter who bought and protected Baxter State Park was the son of a major competitor to B&M in Portland and that is where his fortune came from.

  8. #68
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    Mmmmm, bean hole beans were/are always considered a big draw at family gatherings, Old Home Days, etc. in central NH where a lot of my family lives. As a child I wasn't thrilled with the idea of pulling your meal up out of a hole. Now I sure wish I'd eaten more of them.
    "It goes to show you never can tell." - Charles Edward Anderson Berry

  9. #69

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    The only antiquated equipment I saw in the video was the "batch process" for the beans.I'm surprised they are not cooked in a jacketed tank and then pumped to a filler to eliminate that labor intensive part of the process-OH,I know-"But we've always done it that way!" I've heard that line in a different plant many times before..........

  10. #70

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    My order finally arrived.I'd recommend the B&M brown bread with raisins to anybody.However,I was glad to have a side cutter can opener which greatly facilitated pushing the bread out of the can in a solid loaf.It fit in a quart size ziplock bag.I plan to take it pre-sliced and have some Philadelphia cream cheese with it for a breakfast treat.

  11. #71
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    It seems the only way to get it down south is the internet and it is only available in multiple quantities. So... two questions: Does it require refridgeration before opening and how long will unopened cans keep? Thanks!

  12. #72
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    I dont think there is an expiration date on unopened cans and it does not need refrigeration. My guess is the flavor may go off but it is not unsafe. My guess is years maybe decades as long as the cans are kept dry so they dont rust on the outside. As for opened, the beans will go bad in 4 or 5 days when kept in a fridge as its an ideal growth media. I would expect the same with the brown bread. We ate the brown bread when I was a kid as my dad liked it. I think he toasted it and on occasion would fry it. That is a long time ago and it sure wasnt health food but he made it to 97 so it wasnt that bad for him.

    BTW Walmart will deliver cases for free to pick up at the local store. I think it was the least cost option.

  13. #73

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    My cans have a best used by date of Nov. 2022.This does not really mean anything other than taste etc as the general consensus in the canned foods industry is that the product is a good as the container its in.So long as the container is not compromised and retains its hermetic seal,the product inside should be considered safe for use.Palatability is another question altogether.

    I heard once that a Civil War era ship had been raised and that some of the canned food on board was still preserved;not recommending anyone eat something out of date though.So far as the bread is concerned after opening I would expect it to get dried out and stale before getting moldy if kept in a refrigerator because the water content of the bread is low and the texture is reasonably dense compared to sandwich bread.

    It's my intention to keep mine in a freezer bag a few days just to see how it keeps and will post my findings
    soon.

  14. #74
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    Thanks guys!

  15. #75

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    Got my B&M today. Opened one can, sliced it thin and put it into a peanut butter jar. Put it in the fridge for tomorrow mornings hot chocolate

    PXL_20201211_211744554.jpgPXL_20201211_235006406.jpgPXL_20201211_235644938.jpgPXL_20201212_000134974_2.jpg

  16. #76

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    I have not successfully tested the shelf life of opened unrefrigerated B&M Brown bread because I can't stop eating it.
    That stuff is addictive.Two pats of butter on about a 3 oz slice of it and warmed a half minute in the microwave makes it my drug of choice.It's going with me on a little overnighter to the Foothills Trail somewhere after Christmas,weather and other conditions permitting........

  17. #77

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    Anyone try dehydrating it?

  18. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    Anyone try dehydrating it?
    If one were to dehydrate it,would it get tough?Would you rehydrate it with water? I did read where they said something about toasting it on the label which I guess would make it a little bit lighter if that's the objective.Personally I like the cake like quality the way it comes out of the can.

  19. #79

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    It was just curiosity - I've got a good dehydrator that I rarely use. If this were easy to dump on a tray and get something useful out of, I might give it a shot. I figured somebody might have gone down that road before to report what they found.

  20. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by Five Tango View Post
    If one were to dehydrate it,would it get tough?Would you rehydrate it with water? I did read where they said something about toasting it on the label which I guess would make it a little bit lighter if that's the objective.Personally I like the cake like quality the way it comes out of the can.
    My guess is that it would be crispy, like a crouton, if dehydrated, and turn into a soggy mess if you tried to rehydrate.

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