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  1. #1
    Registered User Sovi's Avatar
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    Wink My gear, what do you think?

    So I have been collecting bits and pieces over time, and I just about finished with that part (link below in signature) Tell me what you think. It's not the lightest but I went as light as I could afford. I imagine I will be tweaking it on the trail ( I hear every first time thru hiker does), but from a starting out aspect I'd like some feedback.
    Thanks
    My evolving gear list, some links provided
    https://www.geargrams.com/list?id=44571

    To each their own, get all the advice you can, then figure out your own path.

  2. #2
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    Your hot link isn’t working

  3. #3
    Registered User Sovi's Avatar
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    Thanks for letting me know. Fixed it
    My evolving gear list, some links provided
    https://www.geargrams.com/list?id=44571

    To each their own, get all the advice you can, then figure out your own path.

  4. #4
    Registered User Sandy of PA's Avatar
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    Are you tenting or hammocking? Half a pound for eating utensils? you only need a spoon. First aid needs reduced unless you have medical issues that require it.

  5. #5
    Registered User jjozgrunt's Avatar
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    This is what I started with this year and what I will be bringing next year to finish the AT. It's been built up over a number of years and I use it for all my bushwalking, not AT specific. https://lighterpack.com/r/czb3eu

    Getting specific, dump the fork I have never used one, and if you have a pocketknife get rid of the knife as well. A long handle spoon is the go.
    Are you actually going to cook or just boil water? If you're not cooking just use one pot to boil water and get rid of the extra pots.
    Unless you are sitting for long periods, get rid of the solar charger. You are constantly changing directions, under canopy etc. I have never found a solar charger worth the weight. Get a suitable sized battery from Anker, or similar, to meet your needs and recharge in town. Don't need to stay at a hostel I recharged at most meal places in town.
    Never been a fan of bladders, drop one while its full and it will probably split. Use a 1.5 lt bottle and get or make your own drink tube like this https://sourceoutdoor.com/en/bottles...dration-system. Bottle gets scungy throw it out and buy another.
    When are you starting? do you need cleats?
    Why a hammock and tent?
    Still a lot of gear missing and I can tell you will easily break the 30lb mark. If you are happy to carry that great, if not look at your big 3, tent, sleeping bag, pack as you can make big savings there.

    Besides here for used gear, you can try second hand places and online sales as well as specific websites such as gear trade.

    https://www.geartrade.com/?gclid=Cj0...UaAhG8EALw_wcB

    Hope this helps.
    "He was a wise man who invented beer." Plato

  6. #6
    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
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    If you don't have some specific condition to worry about, you only need a few bandages and antibiotic cream, plus pills for what ails you (soreness, stomach acid, diarrhea) -- not a full medical kit. In my case I react very strongly to urushiol (the active irritant of poison ivy and poison oak), so I add antihistamine capsules (generic Benadryl) and cortisone cream. But unless you've got several such needs, you should come in quite a bit under 14 oz.

    What are you doing for clothing? You'll be cold on the trail with just socks and rain jacket.

  7. #7
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    Have you been out and used it? Go try it for a easy overnight to start...and tweak from there. Everyone dials in gear differently and has personal needs and wants.

    Me personally? Pack is too heavy and I wouldn't want to through in it. But try it urself and see.

  8. #8
    Registered User Sovi's Avatar
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    The weights on everything without a link where the weight is specified are just a guesstimate of actual weight. after loading what I have in my pack and weighing it it comes to 17.2 lbs so I over guessed somewhere or have trimmed off some of the useless bits( ie. cookpots were trimmed to a single pot, stripped off the brain of my pack etc.)
    my medkit consists of an ace bandage roll, blister tape, 3 packets each of pain relievers, stomach aids and sterile pads. antiseptic wipes, sewing needle, dental floss, and an emergency thermal blanket.

    I will hit the trail between Feb 11th( if i can catch a ride to the approach trail) and the 13th if I have to hoof it from gainesville ga. So yes I will need the traction for about a month, at which time i will shed that weight. I would do the same for the gaiters too, but the weight there would be negligible if i replaced with a shorter pair.
    I will be cooking every meal I eat( as I am a better cook than any restaurant off the trail I'm sure) Save any trail magic I might come across..though I think I'll miss most of that starting out so early. I will be eating out of the pot I cook in to keep weight down.
    I will be hammocking without a tarp unless in heavy rain or snow.The weight of the tent is worth it to me as a back up plan.
    The missing clothing on my list is not yet purchased. I am still trimming some weight off myself and want a good fit when I start, but it will consist of cotton shorts and shirt for sleeping, 1 pair of nylon convertible pants(legs I will ship home after the snow passes) 1 short sleeve moister wicking shirt 2 pair of boxer briefs(compression) 1 set of long underwear(top and bottom) which will join my pant legs and cleats after snow is passed. The rain jacket has a fleece inner coat that I will likely keep for higher elevation chills.
    I have not decided on boots of trial runners yet. Think I may start with boots and switch half way or so.

    I currently do day hikes wearing a smaller day pack that I load with 40lbs of water bottles. For a couple of reasons. I want to be used to carrying more weight than I will be on the trail and it's good exercise, not to mention when i get thirsty it right there.

    Thanks for the links, I will check those out!
    My evolving gear list, some links provided
    https://www.geargrams.com/list?id=44571

    To each their own, get all the advice you can, then figure out your own path.

  9. #9

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    Um, you never used a hammock in the winter before have you? You can't just put a sleeping bag in a 15 oz hammock and stay warm. And you never know if it's suddenly going to start to rain in the middle of the night so not having the tarp over you is a really bad idea. Ditch the hammock unless you want to invest in a underquilt and other accessories to make it work. You got the 3.5 pound tent and that will be much more practical. Maybe switch to the hammock when it gets wicked hot in July.

    Cooking every meal you eat takes a lot of time and fuel. Before long you'll be eating poptarts for breakfast, gorp for lunch and rama noodles for dinner like everyone else. And lusting for that cheese burger in town.

    Leave your cotton shirt and shorts home. It won't take long before they are damp and clammy, even just as sleep clothes.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  10. #10
    Registered User jjozgrunt's Avatar
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    Sleeping bag in a hammock with no tarp. Ok it's synthetic but it still looses some of its insulation value by being compressed under you, and it will get damp with no tarp. 20F for a mid Feb start may lead to cold nights. I started 12th Mar this year, after it was unseasonably warm according to locals and it was single digits to below zero F overnight on day 3 and 4. I like most walkers never wear cotton, you with your setup, will probably need thermals at night for the first month.

    You seriously need to make a decision on Hammock or tent and then equip yourself for that option. Lot easier to do it now than wait till you get to Neel Gap, where choices will be limited and it will be a lot more expensive.
    "He was a wise man who invented beer." Plato

  11. #11
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Much of what you say about your gear suggests that you need to...
    Get a clue. Pay attention to what people are telling you. You're obviously unacquainted with Jack.
    Cold. Wet. Hypothermic. That will be the first hour. It gets dangerous after that.
    Be dry. Be warm. Be safe.
    By the way, the good folks at the Blue Ridge Diner in Hot Springs, NC know how to cook better than most.
    Cheers!
    Wayne


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  12. #12
    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sovi View Post
    ... 1 pair of nylon convertible pants(legs I will ship home after the snow passes)
    I'd recommend against that. My L.L. Bean Cresta zip-off pant legs total 103 grams (3.6 ounces). I think keeping the legs available is a good plan in case you misjudge the weather, or to protect against mosquitoes and ticks. I'm also keeping my lightest long-sleeve wicking T-shirt when the weather warms up for mosquito protection.

  13. #13
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    Separate rain jacket and warming layer. If its warm and raining you are going to sweat soak your jacket and when you stop, you have no dry warm layer. Hypotherma is going to get old real fast, unless you die first.

    no cotton. Stick to wool or synthetics. Plan on being wet 90% of the time. From rain, from sweat, it doesn’t matter, it feels the same.

    pack a set of sleeping base layers that never, ever get wet. When you start getting chilled after you’ve stopped for the day and quit setting up camp, and after you’ve eaten you ramen, peanut butter, salami, hot sauce and soup mix, you will want to clmb into your sleeping bag in clean dry clothes.

    Med kit wont need to be more than a few bandaids, leukotape, safety pins, triple anti-biotic ointment, antidiarrheal pills, Ibuprofen. If you need anything more than that, you get off the trail.

  14. #14
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    Solar charger wont work in the rain, fog, clouds you will be hiking in the majority of the time. When the sun finally comes out, so do the leaves. You will walk in a green tunnel.

  15. #15

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    That list needs to evolve a lot more before it's ready for prime time.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  16. #16
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    Your backpack is too heavy. I can't figure out if you are in a tent or a hammock. if you are in a hammock and have no underquilt you will be purchasing one by the time you get to Neels Gap for sure.

  17. #17
    Registered User Turtle-2013's Avatar
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    You are being given some good advise here ... listen to it ... BUT, in the end you have to make your own decisions based on your own experiences. Some of the "need to's" are a matter of style, and not the only safe way ... for instance no offence to Egilbe, but I wouldn't eat "ramen, peanut butter, salami, hot sauce and soup mix" unless my life depended on it ; ) ... and I have know people who have carried heavy packs (up to 90#) the entire length of the trail. SO, while I would cut out a lot of what you have, make other substitutions, and go as light as I can ... that is MY style based on 50 years of my hiking experiences, and it works for me. What will work for you is a different matter, and assuming you can survive the experience, experience will be the BEST teacher ... have a great hike!!!

  18. #18

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    Welcome. Don't worry about negative tone in comments, but take it to mean that you have a lot of prep to do.
    i'll echo a few things and help you prioritize what you need to do:
    1. You need to realize that it gets VERY COLD in early feb and your stuff won't do it. I only recommend feb to people that have their gear dialed in and are smart hikers
    2. You should get rid of the hammock idea and you will need a high r-value sleeping pad. If you want hammock, you need underquilt (not an expert on further info there)
    3. That sleeping bag is 1.5 lbs of synthetic insulation. Not close to enough warmth for that time of year. You need a more substantive sleeping bag and a down jacket for that time of year.
    4. As mentioned above, solar isn't good on the trail. Lots of tree. Lots of clouds. Too heavy. Get a charger on amazon, about 6 oz weight will get you a good about of battery
    5. first aid doesn't usually weigh that much for what 1 person needs
    6. no experience with that pack. heavy, but could work to start. You need trail budget for failed gear or things that aren't working for you

  19. #19

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    Another important point to consider now:
    The trail is a lot more kind to newer hikers with cheap gear in April/May!

  20. #20

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    Can't see the pack list, but one thing to remember, not just "first time thru hikers" tweak their gear. It's a constant process. No point in using what doesn't work.

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