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Thread: Opinions!

  1. #1
    Registered User SoaknWet's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-14-2017
    Location
    Washington,Pa
    Age
    72
    Posts
    163

    Default Opinions!

    Hello to everyone! I'm new to the WB forum so let me start by saying I'm 69, not in the best of health, but know my limits. My dream for 2018 is to start south on the A.T from Harper's Ferry.Where the opinions come in is what to do if I get to Georgia. Are there trails that would keep me moving south to Florida? My daughter's suggested turning around, you guys call flip-flopping, and start back home.
    Equipment wise I'm pretty good just have to make up my mind on hammock or tent, alcohol or gas stove. I've been replacing all my camping equipment, old stuff, with the new lightweight stuff and have been practicing with it on local outing and in my yard.
    Well I guess I'll just out the floor for opinions.

  2. #2
    Leonidas
    Join Date
    04-26-2016
    Location
    Birmingham, Alabama
    Posts
    1,050

    Default

    You could continue onto the BMT, the Pinhoti, Alabama road walk and down to the Florida Trail.
    AT: 471 mi
    Benton MacKaye Trail '20
    Pinhoti Trail '18-19'

    @leonidasonthetrail https://www.youtube.com/c/LeonidasontheTrail

  3. #3

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    As you hike, you will meet people and form friendships. You will be hiking for months, and if you make it to Georgia, you will know what you want to do then. Making plans now is pretty much useless, as whatever you "plan" will change over and over during your hike. One thing that is a certainty on the AT: you must be flexible. You can plan all you like, but the AT makes plans of its own, and weather, injury, finances, friendships, etc. will change your plans as you hike.

  4. #4

    Default

    Given your age and "not in the best of health" statement, getting to Georgia is a pretty big "IF". Be that as it may, as JC13 said, it is possible to continue south, but those trails are significantly harder to manage logistically.

    My guess is IF you make it to Springer, you'll just want to go home.

    Actually, a flip flop is when you go back to where you started and continue to finish the trail. In your case it would be either going back to HF and going north, or going to Katahdin and going south. A yo-yo is when you turn around at the end and go back the way you came. It's just semantics.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trailweaver View Post
    As you hike, you will meet people and form friendships. You will be hiking for months, and if you make it to Georgia, you will know what you want to do then. Making plans now is pretty much useless, as whatever you "plan" will change over and over during your hike. One thing that is a certainty on the AT: you must be flexible. You can plan all you like, but the AT makes plans of its own, and weather, injury, finances, friendships, etc. will change your plans as you hike.
    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    Given your age and "not in the best of health" statement, getting to Georgia is a pretty big "IF". Be that as it may, as JC13 said, it is possible to continue south, but those trails are significantly harder to manage logistically.

    My guess is IF you make it to Springer, you'll just want to go home.

    Actually, a flip flop is when you go back to where you started and continue to finish the trail. In your case it would be either going back to HF and going north, or going to Katahdin and going south. A yo-yo is when you turn around at the end and go back the way you came. It's just semantics.
    Both are sound advice. The most traveled plan would be to get picked up in GA at Springer and head back to where you started, or to Maine and finish the trail. IF you can stick it out all the way to GA in a timely manner, you will be in better health and IMO be physically able to complete the rest of the trail, time allowing of course. After being programmed by the AT for half the trail, it would take quite the experienced traveler/ hiker to transition immediately onto a hiking plan like heading south to Big Cypress National Preserve.

    Trail Miles: 4,090.3 - AT Trips: 71
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 116.0
    BMT Map: 57.7
    Pinhoti Trail Map: 31.5

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