Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23
  1. #1
    Registered User JoeVogel's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-31-2017
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Age
    28
    Posts
    43

    Default 7.2 lb gear list/shakedown

    Hi everyone! I would love to hear your thoughts on this gear list. Am I missing anything? Also, i'm not super happy with my mug/cup option here any suggestions for a mug 1 oz or under?

    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...it?usp=sharing

    feel free to comment here or directly in the google spreadsheet.

    thanks!

  2. #2

    Default

    Couldn't figure out how you got to $3500 for all that then noticed you have a $999 phone. Hope you don't loose or break it! Oh, you might want a charger and a battery pack for when AC in not available.

    It would be helpful to know where and when this gear is to be used. AT thru hike starting when?

    You have a hat and gloves, but the rest of the list looks like its for warm weather hiking. No T-shirt or base layers. People either take too many clothes or not enough. I believe you have not enough. 30 degree quilt, with no bottom insulation. Good to maybe 45 degrees if you have no long sleeve base + bottom base layer and no liner.

    If you need allergy pills, you need a lot more then 6.
    You don't need a compass.
    Just go with a mini bic lighter. Actually get 2, always have a spare hidden away.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  3. #3
    Registered User JoeVogel's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-31-2017
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Age
    28
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    Couldn't figure out how you got to $3500 for all that then noticed you have a $999 phone. Hope you don't loose or break it! Oh, you might want a charger and a battery pack for when AC in not available.

    It would be helpful to know where and when this gear is to be used. AT thru hike starting when?

    You have a hat and gloves, but the rest of the list looks like its for warm weather hiking. No T-shirt or base layers. People either take too many clothes or not enough. I believe you have not enough. 30 degree quilt, with no bottom insulation. Good to maybe 45 degrees if you have no long sleeve base + bottom base layer and no liner.

    If you need allergy pills, you need a lot more then 6.
    You don't need a compass.
    Just go with a mini bic lighter. Actually get 2, always have a spare hidden away.
    Thanks so much for your input. I'll have to look at some good base layers for colder weather. I tend to sleep hot so this has served me well down to about 40 degrees but I'm new to the east coast so I will have to see how the climate difference effects my sleeping comfort. I should also mention that I shove all my "soft" gear under my legs for insulation so that helps.

    The allergy pills are really for if I or someone gets a yellow jacket stink and has a bad reaction. I don't need an epipen but the benadryl tablets are enough to fend off excessive swelling or even slow down a more severe reaction to buy you some time in an emergency.

  4. #4
    Registered User JoeVogel's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-31-2017
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Age
    28
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeVogel View Post
    Thanks so much for your input. I'll have to look at some good base layers for colder weather. I tend to sleep hot so this has served me well down to about 40 degrees but I'm new to the east coast so I will have to see how the climate difference effects my sleeping comfort. I should also mention that I shove all my "soft" gear under my legs for insulation so that helps.

    The allergy pills are really for if I or someone gets a yellow jacket stink and has a bad reaction. I don't need an epipen but the benadryl tablets are enough to fend off excessive swelling or even slow down a more severe reaction to buy you some time in an emergency.
    haha yeah, I put the phone in there just for kicks. I currently have a cracked screen iphone 7 that does the job.

    This list is just a general list, to be adjusted slightly for specific conditions and hikes. Next trip I am making is next week in the Adirondacks, I plan on bringing some extra warmth for the cold nights. Especially after your advice.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeVogel View Post
    haha yeah, I put the phone in there just for kicks. I currently have a cracked screen iphone 7 that does the job.

    This list is just a general list, to be adjusted slightly for specific conditions and hikes. Next trip I am making is next week in the Adirondacks, I plan on bringing some extra warmth for the cold nights. Especially after your advice.
    The thing with the east coast is not only is cold, but it's a damp cold which cuts to the bone. It's getting cold in the mountains and there has already been snow, so bring a lot of warm clothes! No matter what the temp, whatever your wearing while hiking will get wet from sweat. You need a change of clothes when you get to camp and to sleep in.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    The thing with the east coast is not only is cold, but it's a damp cold which cuts to the bone. It's getting cold in the mountains and there has already been snow, so bring a lot of warm clothes! No matter what the temp, whatever your wearing while hiking will get wet from sweat. You need a change of clothes when you get to camp and to sleep in.
    If it's cold and you're sweating enough to be an issue, they you are overdressed or wearing the wrong raingear. I've never taken sleeping cloths, summer, winter, or whatnot. I'm just too lazy . . . I take that back (the never sleeping cloths, not the lazy). In the warmer months, although I hike most of the day in shorts and a t-shirt, I'll often sleep in my long-johns (that I didn't hike in) because I tune the sleep insulation for long-john use. I will then often hike the first hour or so in the morning in my long-johns before stripping down. In winter, I usually sleep in the cloths I wore all day, but I add some extra insulation like my puffy jacket since. Again, my sleep insulation is planned with the expectation that I am wearing most of my cloths.

    Now, I will often have some damp cloths from wet snow or rain, but those dry out while I sleep, and if they are wet enough that I will be cool sleeping, I'll add a hot water bottle to my bag to help dry everything out faster and more comfortably. It works great on wet pant bottoms. And finally, if it has been a typically bad Pacific Northwest all-day soaking rain and my cloths are truly wet, I will not sleep with them, but rather hang them up wet and put them back on wet in the morning. . . not an issue in the winter then it's freezing.

    I probably stink more than Slo-go'en.

    As for Northeast damp cold, it's nothing here in New England compared to the damp cold of the Pacific Northwest. My take on damp cold in New England is that it tends to be either really cold or really damp. And, the damp only lasts a day or so before the weather changes. It's not the weeks long endless drizzle in the mid to low 30's of the Pacific Northwest Coast Climate. So, no belly-aching about New England "damp cold" permitted.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  7. #7
    Registered User JoeVogel's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-31-2017
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Age
    28
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nsherry61 View Post
    If it's cold and you're sweating enough to be an issue, they you are overdressed or wearing the wrong raingear. I've never taken sleeping cloths, summer, winter, or whatnot. I'm just too lazy . . . I take that back (the never sleeping cloths, not the lazy). In the warmer months, although I hike most of the day in shorts and a t-shirt, I'll often sleep in my long-johns (that I didn't hike in) because I tune the sleep insulation for long-john use. I will then often hike the first hour or so in the morning in my long-johns before stripping down. In winter, I usually sleep in the cloths I wore all day, but I add some extra insulation like my puffy jacket since. Again, my sleep insulation is planned with the expectation that I am wearing most of my cloths.

    Now, I will often have some damp cloths from wet snow or rain, but those dry out while I sleep, and if they are wet enough that I will be cool sleeping, I'll add a hot water bottle to my bag to help dry everything out faster and more comfortably. It works great on wet pant bottoms. And finally, if it has been a typically bad Pacific Northwest all-day soaking rain and my cloths are truly wet, I will not sleep with them, but rather hang them up wet and put them back on wet in the morning. . . not an issue in the winter then it's freezing.

    I probably stink more than Slo-go'en.

    As for Northeast damp cold, it's nothing here in New England compared to the damp cold of the Pacific Northwest. My take on damp cold in New England is that it tends to be either really cold or really damp. And, the damp only lasts a day or so before the weather changes. It's not the weeks long endless drizzle in the mid to low 30's of the Pacific Northwest Coast Climate. So, no belly-aching about New England "damp cold" permitted.
    thanks! yeah, I typically sleep in my clothes as well unless I gets totally soaked. sleeping clothes aren't worth the extra pound to me.

  8. #8

    Default

    1. You may want to switch your spreadsheet to Lighterpack.com because it is easier to work with for the reader, and you can just hit the share but for a pasteable link.

    2. A Vargo Bot might be more versatile than that pan. Realistically not too many people actually fry with those lids but you can with the Bot lid too and, if you haven't bot it yet (ha), the bot lid seals so you can carry a little more water to cook with at end of the day and also pre-soak your meals, etc. Just flip the lid upside down to heat water, don't leave it sealed or it'll blow up.

    3. For a lighter cup just use your cook pot to drink and buy a pair of "hot lips" silicone lips for the edge of your pot.

  9. #9

    Default

    The 700 ml Bot has handles, the 900 does Bot, not.

  10. #10

    Default

    - Sawyers squeeze pouches busts fairly easily -> Option 1, smart water bottles are less prone to failure. Option 2, evernew bladder, don't use a plate due to incompatible threads)
    - The cup is a luxury
    - Plaid fleece might not have as good warmth to weight as a microgrid fleece
    - consider a shell on top of the liners or spare socks as mitts

  11. #11
    Registered User JoeVogel's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-31-2017
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Age
    28
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SwathHiker View Post
    1. You may want to switch your spreadsheet to Lighterpack.com because it is easier to work with for the reader, and you can just hit the share but for a pasteable link.

    2. A Vargo Bot might be more versatile than that pan. Realistically not too many people actually fry with those lids but you can with the Bot lid too and, if you haven't bot it yet (ha), the bot lid seals so you can carry a little more water to cook with at end of the day and also pre-soak your meals, etc. Just flip the lid upside down to heat water, don't leave it sealed or it'll blow up.

    3. For a lighter cup just use your cook pot to drink and buy a pair of "hot lips" silicone lips for the edge of your pot.
    Thanks, I will have to look into that Vargo Bot.

    The idea behind having a cup in addition to the pot is that I like to have breakfast/dinner and coffee/a drink at the same time.

  12. #12

    Default

    Plate= platypus

  13. #13

    Default

    Okay. Well if you are dedicated to a real breakfast with a plan for a plate too, then you may want to ignore me and use that other pot with the handle on the frypan lid. You'll need a better stove because the one you have concentrates fire right under the center to a burn spot and everything will stick there, in my opinion but experiment at home.

  14. #14

    Default

    Are you thru-hiking the AT? realistically you may just get up and eat real quick and drink your coffee (I use the same pot, and many people don't even bother cooking in the AM never mind drinking coffee. I usually do two packets of oatmeal and mount hagen instant coffee), and just go to log some miles. There are so many restaurants to stop in every few days that it's not a big deal to go without on the trail. You'll probably want to hitch and grab breakfast and resupply every few days anyway to keep your pack weight down. You'll start to feel like you are burning daylight messing around with breakfast after a week. And in the interim week you'll be too cold to sit there and mess around with breakfast! Anyway, I'll be out there too!

  15. #15
    Registered User JoeVogel's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-31-2017
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Age
    28
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SwathHiker View Post
    Are you thru-hiking the AT? realistically you may just get up and eat real quick and drink your coffee (I use the same pot, and many people don't even bother cooking in the AM never mind drinking coffee. I usually do two packets of oatmeal and mount hagen instant coffee), and just go to log some miles. There are so many restaurants to stop in every few days that it's not a big deal to go without on the trail. You'll probably want to hitch and grab breakfast and resupply every few days anyway to keep your pack weight down. You'll start to feel like you are burning daylight messing around with breakfast after a week. And in the interim week you'll be too cold to sit there and mess around with breakfast! Anyway, I'll be out there too!
    This is more of a general list for trips usually 3-4 days long. Would be modified slightly for longer trips and if I was doping the PCT or AT I would definitely elect for easier and quicker breakfasts. This is usually what I do: boil water, pour some water into the cup for coffee, pour oatmeal into the pot to eat. On shorter trips I will sometimes make a cheddar bacon bannock or something like that for breakfast or dinner thus I like to have the pan. I haven't used the BSR stove on the pan yet, i recently got it and previously has the Snowpeak gigapower 2.0 which worked nicely

  16. #16

    Default

    Sorry about that, I thought you were in the thru-hiking forum is all!

  17. #17

    Default

    Dang, that bannock recipe looks yummy!
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-20-2017
    Location
    Saint Johns, FL
    Age
    52
    Posts
    629

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    Dang, that bannock recipe looks yummy!
    ha ha, I thought the same thing when I read it this morning...asked my wife if we had any cheddar....i was going to make it for breakfast....oh well, another day

  19. #19

    Default

    ha,ha! Not enough coffee

    And as far a mug goes it is one of my luxury items, I use the double wall snowpeak mug and use the GSI coffee drip... i even bring in a couple of sugar packets. Love relaxing with a "good" cup of coffee.

    Your kit has many similarities to mine. Depending on conditions I bring BOTH my essence jacket and my poncho; poncho for hiking/groundsheet/shelter and essence for camp/sleep.

  20. #20
    Registered User JoeVogel's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-31-2017
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Age
    28
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by poolskaterx View Post
    ha,ha! Not enough coffee

    And as far a mug goes it is one of my luxury items, I use the double wall snowpeak mug and use the GSI coffee drip... i even bring in a couple of sugar packets. Love relaxing with a "good" cup of coffee.

    Your kit has many similarities to mine. Depending on conditions I bring BOTH my essence jacket and my poncho; poncho for hiking/groundsheet/shelter and essence for camp/sleep.
    I do like that snowpeak mug but I just cant justify the weight for me. I work in the specialty coffee industry so I would much prefer to bring my camp pour over and some really good coffee, but again, the weight. Apline Start Instant Coffee is actually pretty good for the price. If you want really good coffee also check out Sudden Coffee, Voila or Swift Cup Coffee It's not the cheapest coffee but it is really good. Almost as good as any fresh brewed cup of coffee. Good enough to drink without sugar in fact.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •