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  1. #1
    Registered User backtrack213's Avatar
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    Default parents not on board for thru hike

    Got my permit to hike the PCT but my parents are not happy with my decision of wanting to quit my job and hike the trail. Anybody have experiences like this? What did you do for insurance while out there? How was it finding work when your hike was over? Am i being silly throwing caution to the wind? I'm not in my career and am hoping to move on to a more stable career type job afterwards.

  2. #2
    John B's Avatar
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    You're 26, right? If you're living on your own and financially supporting yourself 100%, then perhaps they should respect your decisions.

  3. #3
    Registered User backtrack213's Avatar
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    I don't live on my own but shortly after returning from the trail my goal would be to move out asap.

  4. #4
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    Most parents are probably going to think the idea of quitting a job to go be "bum" for six months is not a good idea.

    My first long hike changed my life for ever. I'm more responsible and resourceful today cause of it.

    There's a lot of us here who still work in our field after thru hiking.

    I may be one of the lucky ones, but I plan on hiking in 2018, and will probably be able to rejoin the company I work for when I return. Thats even if I want to.

    There's no reason you shouldn't be able to find work after your thru hike if you have skills and character.

    We hire people off the street all the time with little to no experience in our field for decent money. Most of them are successful. I'd hire an AT thru hiker in a second as long as you were mature.

    "In order to live an extraordinary life one must do extraordinary things"

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  5. #5
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    The journey will do more good than harm to your life. Unless a bear eats you...

  6. #6
    Registered User Studlintsean's Avatar
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    You are a grown adult, do whatever you want. If you come home and they tell you that you cannot live there any longer, be ready to accept that and have a plan B. Don't ruin your relationship with your family over it though. You only get one.

  7. #7

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    So, you went and got PCT permits before figuring any of this out? Sounds like an impulsive decision.

    First, what's your camping and backpacking experience? Any at all?

    Second. What's your finances like? Who's going to pay for this? Sounds like you want to move back in with mom and dad afterwards. If you don't have money to help with mortgage and feeding you, I can see where they would not be happy with that.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    So, you went and got PCT permits before figuring any of this out? Sounds like an impulsive decision.

    First, what's your camping and backpacking experience? Any at all?

    Second. What's your finances like? Who's going to pay for this? Sounds like you want to move back in with mom and dad afterwards. If you don't have money to help with mortgage and feeding you, I can see where they would not be happy with that.
    So, you are 26 and living at home. Then, you announce to your parents, who are still subsidizing your planetary existence well past when they should be, that you are quitting whatever meager employment you have and taking off for the trail. And, you expect to just come back home when you are done and for them to resume subsidizing your existence while you look for new, meager employment?

    I can't see why your parents would be displeased with your decision. I'm sure that you will get your life back on track with a PCT hike and that you will become wholly self-reliant upon your hike completion. It's not like you've never followed through on finishing anything before, right?

    Seriously, if you can't see why they aren't pleased, then you should just sit down and talk to them.

  9. #9

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    Hey, Iíve got a 24 year old living at home and Iím gonna suggest he join you on your hike!


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  10. #10

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    Tell them you are moving out. Then hike the trail. When you are done with the trail, get a place of your own. What are your friends doing? Do they live on their own? Can you get a place with one or two of them? It's time to grow up and be a big kid.

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  11. #11
    Registered User jjozgrunt's Avatar
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    Us parents can be a little pissed off at some of the decisions our children make. What seems a good idea at the time is really not taken with our view in mind and sometimes presumes on our supposed willingness to come to the rescue. I've got two girls that still live at home, when they are here. One earlier this year decided she wanted to do PT coaching, so after getting qualified, came home and announced that she had quit her $75,000/yr job to work at a gym where she was only guaranteed $200/wk, and the rest she would have to make up in personal clients. What a nightmare 6 months of supporting her and finally we had to put down the foot and tell her to get a real job. Our other daughter is a dream. She wanted to go travelling and volunteering in Asia, baby Orangutans in Indonesia, building houses in Nepal ect so she has saved $50000 in just over 15 months, left 20% with us for when she gets back and set off. It's all about how you approach what you want and how responsible you are in attaining it, just don't assume that parents will be happy to support you in your endeavours.
    "He was a wise man who invented beer." Plato

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by jjozgrunt View Post
    Us parents can be a little pissed off at some of the decisions our children make. What seems a good idea at the time is really not taken with our view in mind and sometimes presumes on our supposed willingness to come to the rescue. I've got two girls that still live at home, when they are here. One earlier this year decided she wanted to do PT coaching, so after getting qualified, came home and announced that she had quit her $75,000/yr job to work at a gym where she was only guaranteed $200/wk, and the rest she would have to make up in personal clients. What a nightmare 6 months of supporting her and finally we had to put down the foot and tell her to get a real job. Our other daughter is a dream. She wanted to go travelling and volunteering in Asia, baby Orangutans in Indonesia, building houses in Nepal ect so she has saved $50000 in just over 15 months, left 20% with us for when she gets back and set off. It's all about how you approach what you want and how responsible you are in attaining it, just don't assume that parents will be happy to support you in your endeavours.
    How in seven hells is your daughter making 75k and living with you?! If she was mine I'd tell her to pound sand! I bought my first house before I could buy a drink and am teaching my kids to be as self sufficient. I'm not having my kids loaf around my house as an adult. I would very much like them to take a year off after high school and do a long trail, if they like, and wife and I will trail boss for them and send care packs and track progress. But when they get done, they go to school and/or get the hell out. Not that I don't love them all, but they need to grow up, and not when they're 35 like seems to be the new trend. Once my youngest is in college or has turned 19 and been removed from the nest wife and I are living on big land in a small cabin. No space for freeloaders.

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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjozgrunt View Post
    Us parents can be a little pissed off at some of the decisions our children make. What seems a good idea at the time is really not taken with our view in mind and sometimes presumes on our supposed willingness to come to the rescue. I've got two girls that still live at home, when they are here. One earlier this year decided she wanted to do PT coaching, so after getting qualified, came home and announced that she had quit her $75,000/yr job to work at a gym where she was only guaranteed $200/wk, and the rest she would have to make up in personal clients. What a nightmare 6 months of supporting her and finally we had to put down the foot and tell her to get a real job. Our other daughter is a dream. She wanted to go travelling and volunteering in Asia, baby Orangutans in Indonesia, building houses in Nepal ect so she has saved $50000 in just over 15 months, left 20% with us for when she gets back and set off. It's all about how you approach what you want and how responsible you are in attaining it, just don't assume that parents will be happy to support you in your endeavours.
    I'm doubting OP has a job where he can save $50k within less than.....7-10 years. He's 26 and still living at home.

    There's a difference between parents who are understanding and sympathetic and parents who are merely enablers...YOU put your foot down and I'm betting that's the difference...OP's parents probably never put the foot down. Mine would have...but it would have been a boot and it would have been on my arse...you had two choices growing up with my folks at age 18....go to college full-time or go to work full-time. Either way, you were getting out of the house, full-time...

  14. #14
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    So, OP go talk to your folks. Listen to what they have to say. If they give you advice, you may want to consider following it. If they think your hike is a bad idea, find out why they think so. Communicate.

  15. #15
    John B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by backtrack213 View Post
    I don't live on my own but shortly after returning from the trail my goal would be to move out asap.
    I assumed you were on your own. Living at home changes the equation. I would suggest that you move out asap, secure the best job you can, and start saving money and vacation time. I'm certain that your parents would like you to stand on your own two feet . If you get 2 weeks vacation per year, then use that to section hike. Perhaps there will come a time when you're able to do a thru while living on your own.
    Anyway, good luck to you. And good luck to your parents, too.

  16. #16
    Registered User jjozgrunt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Goat View Post
    How in seven hells is your daughter making 75k and living with you?! If she was mine I'd tell her to pound sand!
    She'd only been home 6 months, from working in London for two years, so was just getting to the stage where she had a car, built up some money and we were expecting her to move out. Big Surprise! We have allowed them one bad mistake, and that was hers. Off our hands early next year and becomes the airforce's problem, since they've accepted her for officer training.
    "He was a wise man who invented beer." Plato

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex Clifton View Post
    Hey, I’ve got a 24 year old living at home and I’m gonna suggest he join you on your hike!
    Hey, can I send my 23 year old along with you also?
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  18. #18
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    So much I could say, but Iíll just leave it at this:

    Dude, grow a pair. And Iím not just talking about the PCT and your parents.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex Clifton View Post
    Hey, Iíve got a 24 year old living at home and Iím gonna suggest he join you on your hike!
    Rex, you just gave me the best laugh I have had in a long time. Thanks!

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by backtrack213 View Post
    I don't live on my own but shortly after returning from the trail my goal would be to move out asap.
    Bwahahaha. oh man. no wonder they aren't supportive of your decision. ROFLMAO
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    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

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