WhiteBlaze Pages
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$10 for printed copy(paperback). $6 for interactive PDF. $2 for printable PDF.
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 27 of 27
  1. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-31-2017
    Location
    massachusetts
    Age
    55
    Posts
    256

    Default

    Might sound a little unorthodox but I recently hiked 200+ miles without any socks and not any foot/skin irritation at all.
    1st got a good pair of trail runners 1/2 larger to give my toes a little breathing/swelling room
    2nd bought insoles with heal support tried 3 or 4 different ones till I found one good for me that kept heal stable
    3rd used lock laces so my footwear never loosened while hiking
    4th religiously used talc up to 3x a day in my footwear to keep feet dry and decrease any friction
    5th Carried two pairs of Darn tough socks and only used in the rain. Put them on with talc inside only after my sockless foot got wet then after a few hours would change them out for the second dry pair.
    6th Carried a few small pieces of duoderm and tegaderm just in case got blisters of skin tears on feet...never needed to use it.
    7th dry clean feet in the pm used cushy and warm camp socks... applied real Pure Lanolin Anhydrous 9it's extremely thick and yellowish) to feet/heels every pm before bed

  2. #22

    Default

    I too switched to Altra Lone Peak 3.5’s, and eliminated my blister problem.

    In addition, I took Andrew Skurka’s advice, and coated my feet every morning and evening with Bonnie’s Balm. It is a wax based salve that virtually waterproofs the feet. Thus I was able to walk through water without my feet getting macerated. I did this all through New Hampshire and Maine.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  3. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,097

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Deacon View Post
    ... In addition, I took Andrew Skurka’s advice, and coated my feet every morning and evening with Bonnie’s Balm. It is a wax based salve that virtually waterproofs the feet. Thus I was able to walk through water without my feet getting macerated...
    I've used Bert's Bees Res-Q Ointment, Lemon Butter Cuticle Cream, Foot Creams, Miracle Salve, and Hand Salve to do the same as Andrew at a perhaps lower cost. Compare the like ingredients of both brands of these products.

    ***I'm not sponsored by, receive discounts, or obtain free Bert's Bees products. I also don't live in the state or anywhere near where Bert's Bees products are made.

  4. #24
    -
    Join Date
    08-14-2005
    Location
    Fort Madison, IA
    Age
    58
    Posts
    1,645

    Default

    here is my take on the basic issue: with each step (especially uphill) the foot flexes - a shoe that is less flexible will bear pressure on the heel with each step

    even with no "slip" there is still repetitive pressure and release, ultimately compromising the bonds between the cells of the layers of skin - wha la...... a blister

    my strategy has been to hike in shoes with very flexible soles - as always everything is a compromise, the main issue is short lifespan

  5. #25
    Registered User shelterbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-29-2007
    Location
    Reading, Pa.
    Age
    66
    Posts
    1,844
    Images
    18

    Default

    I had HUGE problems with blisters at the start of my hiking career -- ill-fitting boots, poor socks, etc. After many years, I discovered that my feet do not do well in most boots that are made on the so-called "American" lasts (forms). I started wearing Asolo boots (no, I'm not affiliated with the company) and much of my rubbing troubles stopped. Added to that, I began wearing a poly-pro sock liner under my medium-weight wool socks. The liners tend to REALLY hug the foot, and take much of the "rubbing abuse" that the foot would normally get from the wool socks. The take-away from all of this: search until you find a boot that FITS YOUR FOOT, and then stick with it.
    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass - it's about learning how to dance in the rain!

  6. #26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    here is my take on the basic issue: with each step (especially uphill) the foot flexes - a shoe that is less flexible will bear pressure on the heel with each stepeven with no "slip" there is still repetitive pressure and release, ultimately compromising the bonds between the cells of the layers of skin - wha la...... a blistermy strategy has been to hike in shoes with very flexible soles - as always everything is a compromise, the main issue is short lifespan
    It's voila. Also, others need rigid shoes to avoid plantar fasciitis.

  7. #27

    Default

    Get some nylon dress socks and put them on your bare feet before you put your regular socks on. This will reduce friction.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •