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Thread: 1933 brochure

  1. #1

    Default 1933 brochure

    I happened upon this by accident, and wanted to share it:

    1933 brochure

    No paved roads.

    No frontcountry or backcountry campsites yet.

    Deer and bear almost extinct.

    Hunting, liquor, dynamite and domestic cats banned.

  2. #2
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    Oh to have seen it back then...I got a little wistful reading the section about Wilderness Camping.
    "I am learning nothing in this trivial world of [humans]. I must break away and get out into the mountains to learn the news." --John Muir

  3. #3

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    Whatís the world cominí to when a hiker canít even carry a couple sticks a dynamite

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    I am curious as to what kind of "ball" sport the Indians played that was too strenuous for Caucasians?

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    Didn't look it up, but if memory serves, it was similar to lacrosse.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seatbelt View Post
    I am curious as to what kind of "ball" sport the Indians played that was too strenuous for Caucasians?
    http://www.cherokee.org/About-The-Na...all-a-ne-jo-di

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AbsOJXqjdOk

  7. #7

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    I think the most valuable part of this brochure is the list of references at the end. Most of these would probably be very hard to find, but the list at least lets you know what materials are out there to look for:

    Avery, Myron H. Notes on the Appalachian Trail in the South. Appalachia, Vol. 18, No. 2, Dec. 1930, 198-9.
    Broome, Harvey B. Great Smoky Mountains Trails. Mountain Magazine (Pleasantville, N.Y.) Jan. 1928.
    Cain, Stanley A. The Subalpine Vegetation of the Great Smoky Mountains. A Doctor's thesis, published in part in the Botanical Gazette, 1930, under the title, Soil Reaction and Plant Distribution in the Great Smoky Mountains Na tional Park, Tennessee.
    Am Ecological Study of the Heath Balds of the Great Smoky Mountains. Butler University Botanical Studies, Vol. 1, Paper No. 13, Dec. 1930.
    Grassy Balds of the Smoky Mountains. Butler University Botanical Studies, Indianapolis, 1930.
    Carter, G. F. Camping in the Great Smoky Mountains. Field and Stream, Oct.-Nov., 1902.
    Crouch, Brockway. Hikes in the Great Smokies. Journeys Beautiful, Sept. 1926.
    Fink, Paul M. A week in the Great Smoky Range. Appalachia, Vol. 15, No. 2, 1921.
    Glenn, L. C. The Geology of the Proposed Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Journal Tennessee Academy of Science, Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 13-15, 1926.
    Henry, Mellinger E. Life in the Great Smoky National Park. Ridgefield Life, Sept. 25, 1930.
    Jennison, H. M. A Preliminary Check-List of the Spring Wild Flowers and the Ferns of Tennessee. Journal Tennessee Academy of Science. Vol. 4 (Supplement) pp. 1-32, 1929.
    Kephart, Horace. A National Park in the Great Smoky Mountains. Published by Swain County Chamber of Commerce. 1925.
    Our Southern Highlanders. New York, Macmillan.
    The Last of the Eastern Wilderness. World's Work, 1926.
    A-Foot and A-Wing in the Great Smokies. Field and Stream, Jan. 1929.
    Changing Mountaineers of the South. New York Times, Feb. 9, 1930.
    McCoy, George W., and Masa, George. Guide to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Inland Press, Asheville, N.C. Price, 50 cents.
    Madden, R. S. The Trees of the Great Smokies, Journal Tennessee Academy of Science. Vol. 1, No. 2., pp. 21-24, 1926.
    Mason, Robert Lindsay, The Lure of the Great Smokies. Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1927.
    That Accomplishment of Alphonse's. Outdoor World and Recreation, Jan. 1913.
    Cherokee Tree Myths. American Forests and Forest Life, May, 1929.
    Old Smoky. Nature Magazine, May, 1931.
    Nelson, Wilbur A. The Great Smoky National Park. Outdoors Pictorial, July, 1925.
    North Carolina National Park Commission. The Great Smokies, 1926.
    Shaver, Jessie M. Flowers of the Great Smokies. Journal Tennessee Academy of Science, Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 17-20, 1926.
    Smoky Mountains Hiking Club. Annual Booklets. Box 454, Knoxville, Tenn.
    Thornborough, Laura. The Tennessee Smokies. Outdoor Recreation, July, 1927.
    Tramping the Great Smokies. American Forests and Forest Life, August, 1927.
    A New National Park in the East. American Forests and Forest Life, March, 1930.
    Willy, John. Ten Days in the Proposed Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The Hotel Monthly, Sept. 1926, pp. 44-58.
    Work, Hubert. The Great Smokies. Journeys Beautiful, Sept.
    Yard, Robert Sterling. National Parks Bulletin, No. 46, Nov. 1926.

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    this was a fun read --thank you. i agree with Old_Man --would love to have seen the park back then: pre Balsam blight, Chestnut blight. i feel lucky to have experienced the mountains while the Hemlocks were still around, though my daughter wont. hopefully the Cumberland Hemlocks will hang around long enough.

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    Thanks! Forget about helmets, they don't even have shoes on!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ashepabst View Post
    this was a fun read --thank you. i agree with Old_Man --would love to have seen the park back then: pre Balsam blight, Chestnut blight. i feel lucky to have experienced the mountains while the Hemlocks were still around, though my daughter wont. hopefully the Cumberland Hemlocks will hang around long enough.
    Off topic momentarily: my wife and I took my mother to England one spring, and were driving somewhere in the Wiltshire / Dorset / Somerset border area when she started excitedly talking about seeing Chestnut trees in bloom. She hadn't seen them since her childhood in Alabama.

    Back on subject: I would like to have seen the area in the 1930s as well, but precisely because it wasn't the pristine wilderness we experience today. Logging was still going on up the Middle Prong, and the North Carolina side had been clear cut. There was significant fire damage in the park. John Oliver was still living in Cades Cove, grazing livestock on the balds and fighting eminent domain.


    PDF of the brochure

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