Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 44

Thread: wet wipes

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-09-2016
    Location
    Sanford, NC
    Age
    41
    Posts
    564

    Default wet wipes

    Anybody tried drying out wet wipes and wetting them when needed?
    You can walk in another person's shoes, but only with your feet

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by devoidapop View Post
    Anybody tried drying out wet wipes and wetting them when needed?
    I've heard a lot of people do it, but you have to carry the water to wet them in your pack, so it seems like you're just moving the weight around

  3. #3
    Journeyman Journeyer
    Join Date
    08-09-2016
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Age
    60
    Posts
    167
    Images
    6

    Default

    Not moving weight around. Let's say you are carrying about 20 wipes. You only use a few a day so the remaining ones being dry will save you weight. You don't have to carry the water to re-hydrate those until you need them. Granted we are not talking much weight here unless you carry a lot of wipes.

  4. #4

    Default

    Seems like arguing about ultralight vs stupidlight. Drying wet wipes sounds a lot like carrying paper towels to me. How many grams could possibly be saved?

    Sent from my SM-J327T1 using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Registered User Elaikases's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-26-2016
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    Age
    64
    Posts
    410

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Goat View Post
    Seems like arguing about ultralight vs stupidlight. Drying wet wipes sounds a lot like carrying paper towels to me. How many grams could possibly be saved?

    Sent from my SM-J327T1 using Tapatalk
    There are actually freeze dried wipes available that you rehydrate to use. It is a complete market niche.

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-09-2016
    Location
    Sanford, NC
    Age
    41
    Posts
    564

    Default wet wipes

    As a guy with two little kids I can tell you that a pack of dried out wipes weighs a lot less. I'm not interested in starting a grams debate. just asked if anybody has done it. Next somebody will say that I can save all the weight by not carrying them, or that you can just pick moss as needed to clean yourself.
    You can walk in another person's shoes, but only with your feet

  7. #7
    Registered User lonehiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-18-2005
    Location
    Cheyenne, WY
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,372

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by devoidapop View Post
    Anybody tried drying out wet wipes and wetting them when needed?
    I do this and it works great. Just make sure when you re-hydrate them you don't get them too wet/soggy. Just an JYI when I dry them I separate them into piles of 4 wipes and just allow to air dry. Might turn them once if I think about it.
    Lonehiker

  8. #8
    Registered User Hikes in Rain's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-14-2005
    Location
    Tallahassee, Florida
    Age
    65
    Posts
    2,162
    Images
    23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by devoidapop View Post
    Next somebody will say that I can save all the weight by not carrying them, or that you can just pick moss as needed to clean yourself.
    Well, you could. I've done it, but it's really sub-optimal, and never around when you need it. Drying seems like a good option, especially if you need to carry a bunch. My only real comment, which you probably already know, if that they're really not very biodegradable and should be carried out.

  9. #9

    Default

    Yeah I do - sort of.

    I use 190 grain alcohol for stove fuel and dehydrated vodka, and have a marker size spray bottle with a solution of the alcohol, water, and dr bronners that I use to clean and sterilize my cooking pot/utensil, and as a hand sanitizer, spot / odor remover for dropped food/pine pitch, deodorant, eyeglass cleaner, and of course, combine with paper towels, as a wet wipe.

    Course I carry the three ingredients separately and make more as needed.

  10. #10

    Default

    I dry unscented baby wipes.
    Use 2 per day to clean up before bed.
    I lay them out and let them air dry.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-09-2016
    Location
    Sanford, NC
    Age
    41
    Posts
    564

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hikes in Rain View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by devoidapop View Post
    Next somebody will say that I can save all the weight by not carrying them, or that you can just pick moss as needed to clean yourself.
    Well, you could. I've done it, but it's really sub-optimal, and never around when you need it. Drying seems like a good option, especially if you need to carry a bunch. My only real comment, which you probably already know, if that they're really not very biodegradable and should be carried out.
    Yeah, I think that's where the rub comes in with any weight savings. They're only lighter until you use them, unless you dry them on a rock before they go in the trash bag. Maybe I would do that with the ones I've cleaned my feet, hands, or face with but I don't want to be chasing windblown wipes in the middle of my hygiene routine.
    You can walk in another person's shoes, but only with your feet

  12. #12
    Wanna-be hiker trash
    Join Date
    03-05-2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Age
    38
    Posts
    6,884
    Images
    78

    Default

    I stopped carrying wet wipes years ago. Personally I found that carrying paper towels and a little doc bronner's soap worked better for cleaning.
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-28-2015
    Location
    Bad Ischl, Austria
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,226

    Default

    Grinning here...
    Unless I'm at home and sick, I've totally skipped wipes. Even don't use TP. Just plein good old water, and a drop of liquid baby soap.
    Its not only the weight of stuff, but also the bulk and the ziplock you put it in and the (re-)supply you have to think of.

  14. #14

    Default

    I would think drying them out eliminates any anti-bacterial benefits to the wipes, unless you rehydrate with alcohol.

    Anyway, drying them is too much work for too little reward.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-09-2016
    Location
    Sanford, NC
    Age
    41
    Posts
    564

    Default wet wipes

    You don't have to do much to dry them out. open the package and leave them in a drawer for a week. I know this because it happens to our baby wipes at home all the time.
    You can walk in another person's shoes, but only with your feet

  16. #16
    Leonidas
    Join Date
    04-26-2016
    Location
    Birmingham, Alabama
    Posts
    936

    Default

    Personally, we carry the small 16 count packs. Light and easy to find. They usually come as a bonus when you buy a case of the wipes/refills.
    AT: 471 mi

    Pinhoti Trail '18-19'

    @leonidasonthetrail https://www.youtube.com/user/tehJC13

  17. #17

    Default

    I started my hike with pre-dried wipes. It was surprisingly more difficult to dry them than I expected, given that you leave a pack open by mistake and they seemingly dry within minutes. The biggest benefit of pre-drying them was I could carry a lot more of them for the weight.

    Once I started resupplying in towns, the issue pretty much resolved itself, and I bought what was available. I wasn't going to waste my hiking time goofing around with drying wipes.

    The other thing to consider is the basic sanitation of handling your water bottle after you've used one wipe, and decide that you need a second wipe.

  18. #18
    Registered User The Cleaner's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-26-2010
    Location
    greeneville TN
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,547
    Images
    94

    Default

    Just wondering how hikers got along before they were invented. A few drops of Dr. Bronner's liquid is good for hand washing and does a good job on cook pots. Seems like more and more hikers won't cook in a pot but can't stand a little dirt and sweat on their body. Some just toss used wipes in a firepit expecting others to burn them. I usually find used ones left behind on monthly maintenance trips at Jerry's Cabin shelter. BTW they don't burn well unless you have a good hot fire.
    Sleep on the ground, rise with the sun and hike with the wind....

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Cleaner View Post
    Just wondering how hikers got along before they were invented. A few drops of Dr. Bronner's liquid is good for hand washing and does a good job on cook pots. Seems like more and more hikers won't cook in a pot but can't stand a little dirt and sweat on their body. Some just toss used wipes in a firepit expecting others to burn them. I usually find used ones left behind on monthly maintenance trips at Jerry's Cabin shelter. BTW they don't burn well unless you have a good hot fire.
    I imagine they just plopped down in streams and fouled the water for everyone else.

  20. #20
    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-15-2017
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Age
    64
    Posts
    682

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Cleaner View Post
    Just wondering how hikers got along before they were invented.
    Soap, water, and a bandana. I'll be doing the same on the AT this year as I did in 1979, except substituting Dr. Bronner's soap for "Biosuds" (long out of business, and the name reused by a New Zealand company).

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •