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Thread: Best Dog Breeds

  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by sethd513 View Post
    ........Snipping then causes joint issues so a good rule of thumb is 18-24 months to slay or neuter............
    Did you get this information from your Vet or some online source? Sounds dubious to me that neutering causes joint issues.
    If you don't stand for something, you will fall for anything.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasBob View Post
    Did you get this information from your Vet or some online source? Sounds dubious to me that neutering causes joint issues.
    Vet, trainer and the breeder? Iím sure a google search would behoove you. Have you ever noticed how a neutered dog is tall with skinny legs when they were cut younger then a year in comparison to the same dog uncut. Iím no professional but the family jewels keep everything growing properly. It takes 12 months for joints to fully mature in size. Then itís time to mold your dog the way youíd like. All my family dogs were neutered young and were put down due to hip issues and werenít even hiked with.


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  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by sethd513 View Post
    Vet, trainer and the breeder? Iím sure a google search would behoove you. Have you ever noticed how a neutered dog is tall with skinny legs when they were cut younger then a year in comparison to the same dog uncut. Iím no professional but the family jewels keep everything growing properly. It takes 12 months for joints to fully mature in size. Then itís time to mold your dog the way youíd like. All my family dogs were neutered young and were put down due to hip issues and werenít even hiked with.


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    This sure reminds me of this.....
    https://youtu.be/0slTBGBEf0g



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    Quote Originally Posted by saltysack View Post
    This sure reminds me of this.....
    https://youtu.be/0slTBGBEf0g



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  5. #45
    Registered User kestral's Avatar
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    I have also read in many studies that early neutering and spaying causes growth problems due to imbalance of normal hormones testosterone, estrogen and progesterone. It makes good sense if you think about it.

    All future dogs I get will be sterilized, not spayed or castrated for this reason. My current pup has hip issues, though not severe, thank goodness. She was spayed very young as she was a rescue dog from local pound and it is legally required . My new vet was displeased she was spayed at 10 weeks, said much greater risk of incontinance with young spays in addition to bone deformity. I didnít realize the importance and option of sterilization. Most neutering is done for behavioral problems, spaying so there wonít be a monthly mess (although female dogs keep themselves clean), unwanted pups or dog in heat issues. Now many vets suggest allowing a first heat, then hysterectomy allowing ovaries to remain for health.

    Also nutrition is of course essential for optimum growth. My pup was abandoned at 2-3 weeks, she should have still been nursing. She got supplements and quality pup and dog foods. Met up with her litter mate years later, this was a male pup who looked sickly and a bit malformed as an adult. They looked the same at 3 weeks (like larva).

    my dog is 10 years now, in good health but slowing down.

    She is a catahoula leopard cur or close mix per my vet, if you are curious. About 60 lbs.
    Last edited by kestral; 03-14-2018 at 14:56.

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by kestral View Post
    I have also read in many studies that early neutering and spaying causes growth problems due to imbalance of normal hormones testosterone, estrogen and progesterone. It makes good sense if you think about it.

    All future dogs I get will be sterilized, not spayed or castrated for this reason. My current pup has hip issues, though not severe, thank goodness. She was spayed very young as she was a rescue dog from local pound and it is legally required . My new vet was displeased she was spayed at 10 weeks, said much greater risk of incontinance with young spays in addition to bone deformity. I didn’t realize the importance and option of sterilization. Most neutering is done for behavioral problems, spaying so there won’t be a monthly mess (although female dogs keep themselves clean), unwanted pups or dog in heat issues. Now many vets suggest allowing a first heat, then hysterectomy allowing ovaries to remain for health.

    Also nutrition is of course essential for optimum growth. My pup was abandoned at 2-3 weeks, she should have still been nursing. She got supplements and quality pup and dog foods. Met up with her litter mate years later, this was a male pup who looked sickly and a bit malformed as an adult. They looked the same at 3 weeks (like larva).

    my dog is 10 years now, in good health but slowing down.
    not to mention the depression.

  7. #47
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    I found this article rather fitting and interesting.
    Blackheart

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    Quote Originally Posted by BuckeyeBill View Post
    I found this article rather fitting and interesting.
    Fits perfectly with my experiences!

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    Last time I was on the At in Ga. I ran across a guy with a Pit and chihuahua. The pit was so happy to be out there and loving on everyone he came across the chihuahua not so much. I have a pit mix now that does really good on the tail. I take her for about 3 mile hikes across town everyday just about. She does so so with heat but when it cool out you better be ready to go. Would not trade her for anything

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Puddlefish View Post
    Mutts are generally healthier.
    My vet has said this, mutts/cross breeds do not have the issues with congenital defects of pure breeds. Hip dysplasia, eye issues, cancer to name a few. I assume this is from her experience over her practice. While I would still have a lab mix, GSD mix checked for hip issues, especially if the mix includes two breeds with hip issues, I really do not expect for hip issues to be present in 99% of say Lab mixes or GSD mixes.

  11. #51
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    Hiked up to Guyot campsite and Bondcliff in the NH Whites a couple years ago with a guy who had a Boxer (Baxter the Boxer) that dog was an incredibly agile and sure footed boy. Always felt bad he named that dog Baxter, when Baxter State Park ( Katahdin) prohibits dogs anywhere in the park...motorcycles too! My Redbone Hound, Rocco, can hike in the woods all day, and my late Springer, Ben was a hell of a trail dog, neither of which I climbed a mountain with, but both could put in some miles on the trails.
    Last edited by Ben795; 06-19-2019 at 20:35.

  12. #52
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    I have two year old litter mate Portuguese water dogs which make great hiking companions, a male and a female. The female will make a great hiking companion, the male might be ok too but he is a bit of a prima donna so we shall see. The problem with two is they work for themselves when together so I probably will only take the female with me on longer hikes. she is as tough as nails and has endless energy, a 10 mile hike, she naps for an hour and is rearing to go again. But when we are going, she is obedient, has great recall and loves people. She is especially happy if there is water anywhere which presents an issue in and of itself, she will swim or roll in every puddle and she will also drink from it. I have no desire to muzzle her so the drinking is always a concern. She is just now old enough to start some real hiking. Yeah!

  13. #53

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    I trail run with our Rhodesian Ridgeback, great energy and agility. Considered hiking with him, but haven't.
    "It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is most adaptable to change". Charles Darwin

  14. #54
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    How about a Chinook (state dog of New Hampshire)? Similar attributes to those of a husky.
    "It goes to show you never can tell." - Charles Edward Anderson Berry

  15. #55

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    I have two dogs, a Lab and a Pug.

    I would rather not see dogs on the AT at all. I applaud GSMNP and BSP for their respective rules on this.

    I seriously doubt whole trail will ever ban them. I won't avoid trails with dogs allowed, just prefer otherwise.

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