Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 42
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-13-2003
    Location
    Smyrna, GA
    Age
    70
    Posts
    421

    Default Camp Shoes/are they worth it?

    After two years of reducing pack weight I have recently been adding weight...my latest, camp shoes. Do I really need them?
    Camping at Three Forks a year ago, I took some 3 oz. flip flops during the summer.

    It started raining at 9 pm as I went into the tent and remained a steady rain into the morning....I wanted to eat breakfast in my tent but how do I get the bear bag down? I stripped, put on my flip flops and got the bear bag and ran back to the tent and dried with a bananda (70 uses).

    Since that time, I have considered if I really want the weight of camp shoes...I have tried river shoes, bedroom slippers, sandals, etc...too heavy! (12-16 oz.) I hate flip flops..no use in winter... what else?

    I was returning from the Springer Mountain area ( 3 inches snow)yesterday and stopped at an Outlet Mall and went to the Nike store and found some water sandles you could use socks with in winter and would stay on your feet for river crossings for $7. I purchased them, but I am looking at them as I write this and wonder if the weight is worth it? (7.1 oz) To add to this, I just changed to trail running shoes last year...is this duplication?

    I would like some feedback of what you use if any, and the advantages and disadvanages of camp shoe use...other uses, etc....should I put these in my pack?

  2. #2
    Donating Member/AT Class of 2003 - The WET year
    Join Date
    09-27-2002
    Location
    Laramie, WY
    Age
    70
    Posts
    7,151
    Images
    90

    Default

    Happy ...since you're not wearing boots it may not be an issue. But for me ...camp shoes (sandals) are a must. In the coldest of weather on our 2001 AT hike we couldn't wait to get out of the boots and into our sandals. Another thing for boot wearers is when you are in a town or hostel. Awfully nice being able to slip into a comfy pair of sandals to make that store run or to do your laundry.
    Dunno ...just seems to me that having something to fall back on, even if it's jut a cheap pair of flip-flops, is better than only having a single pair of footwear be it boots or trail shoes.
    Just my .02
    The more I learn ...the more I realize I don't know.

  3. #3
    First Sergeant SGT Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-03-2002
    Location
    Maryville, TN
    Age
    52
    Posts
    14,864
    Images
    248

    Default

    After I went to running shoes as my hiking footgear I've not carried camp shoes. Just leave them unlaced and walk gangsta style.
    SGT Rock
    http://hikinghq.net

    My 2008 Trail Journal of the BMT/AT

    BMT Thru-Hikers' Guide
    -----------------------------------------

    NO SNIVELING

  4. #4

    Default

    I vote to keep the 3 oz flip flops. I found the cheap flip-flops a "must have" on my summer hike. Upon arriving at camp you can immediately take off your boots and sweaty socks and begin to "air out" your feet. I think you could also use them in the spring as long as the mud or snow isn't too bad. You can even wear socks with them if you put them on carefully.

  5. #5
    Section Hiker 500 miles smokymtnsteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-30-2002
    Location
    Fairbanks AK, in a outhouse.
    Age
    60
    Posts
    4,545
    Images
    33

    Default

    I'm keeping my camp shoes...not only is it better LNT to not wear boots around camp theres always a what if.

    back in 2000 at the fontana Hilton a hiker came in barefooted and limping..what happened??..well he had took the AT up and then to spence field and decided to come back to fontana via Eagle creek trail ,a trail that has many creek crossings ..at the creek crossings he was taking his boots off and hanging them around his neck to keepem dry and he slipped and fell...boots came off from around his neck and DOWN the Creek they went..well as the boots went down the creek this feller hike's went UP THE creek.. without a paddle , well in this case without boots...

    Bet he wished that he had a pair of some kinda of extra footwear...

    well then there's the Barefoot sister's....

  6. #6
    GA-ME 02 Kilted Hiker Trail Yeti's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-01-2002
    Location
    Boone, NC
    Age
    42
    Posts
    305
    Images
    5

    Default

    Just hike in Chacos....take off your socks and you've got your camp shoes. And yes, you can wear them in the snow/winter, get a pair of goretex socks and wear thin liners underneath them.
    If you ain't interested in this, I would keep the camp shoes. I was pretty light last year and still carried my TWO POUND chacos as camp shoes, when i wasn't hiking in them of course!
    "Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit"- Ed Abbey

  7. #7
    Registered User Peaks's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-04-2002
    Location
    Marlboro, MA
    Posts
    3,057

    Default Camp shoes?

    I think that camp shoes is a good question. Here is kinda what I have figured out.

    First, it's tough to ford streams in Maine with a pack and without something on your feet. So, you need something, at least in Maine.

    Second, after it's been raining all day and your boots are soaked, it's nice to be able to put on something that isn't cold and damp. Especially nice when you need to make a run to water a tree, or get water etc.

    My first year, I carried old running shoes. The next year, I carried Teva's. I'm still looking for something lighter. Possibly flip flops. Several people carried the plastic water shoes.

    Any reports on using seal skins when your boots are soaked?

  8. #8

    Default

    I agree with Sgt. Rock, git wit da G-Funk stylin, another method(old boy scout trick) is to glue or sew a strap of leather/vinyl to a pair of old socks.

  9. #9

    Default

    I have a 2 oz. pair of bedroom slippers with a rubber-like bottom that are very comfortable around camp. The top is a thin, stretchy material. I got them at Walmart.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-26-2002
    Location
    Springboro, Ohio
    Posts
    1,885
    Images
    51

    Default

    Brawny has instructions for some homemade camp shoes that weigh almost nothing here:http://www.trailquest.net/index.html

  11. #11
    Yes, I know I mis-spelled "Hamster"...
    Join Date
    11-26-2002
    Location
    Athol, MA
    Age
    37
    Posts
    705
    Images
    30

    Default

    I'm seriously thinking about bringing both lightweight trailrunners, and lightweight sandals (like the Teva Wraptors). I'm learning so much reading Ray Jardine's book, and he even sacrifices extra weight for sandals. It allows you to hike around camp and in wet climates with the sandals, and then throw the runners on when it gets cool, or rough. Keeps your feet from rotting too. Nice in camp as well. Haven't fully decided yet...
    "A man builds a fine house; and now he has a master, and a task for life; he is to furnish, watch, show it, and keep it in repair, the rest of his days".
    ...Ralph Waldo Emerson


    GA-ME Someday (Maybe '06?)
    Many Miles in Massachusetts & Vermont...

  12. #12
    Donating Member/AT Class of 2003 - The WET year
    Join Date
    09-27-2002
    Location
    Laramie, WY
    Age
    70
    Posts
    7,151
    Images
    90

    Default Teva Wraptors

    Hey RH ...how heavy are those Wraptors ??
    The more I learn ...the more I realize I don't know.

  13. #13
    Yes, I know I mis-spelled "Hamster"...
    Join Date
    11-26-2002
    Location
    Athol, MA
    Age
    37
    Posts
    705
    Images
    30

    Default

    Oh I'm not sure, I havent even looked at sandal weights yet! I haven't even decided on the trailrunner I want for this springs hiking season!
    "A man builds a fine house; and now he has a master, and a task for life; he is to furnish, watch, show it, and keep it in repair, the rest of his days".
    ...Ralph Waldo Emerson


    GA-ME Someday (Maybe '06?)
    Many Miles in Massachusetts & Vermont...

  14. #14
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-03-2002
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Age
    62
    Posts
    5,433
    Images
    558

    Default

    Sgt. Rock in his gangsta personna...now that's something I've got to see!
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

  15. #15

    Default

    Yes Yes Y'all- Ya know it's Sgt Rock!
    He's kickin' out the rhymes
    An' he's goin' non-stop!

  16. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-11-2002
    Location
    Apopka FL
    Age
    63
    Posts
    85

    Default Re: Camp shoes?

    Originally posted by Peaks
    Any reports on using seal skins when your boots are soaked?
    I wear Sealskinz waterproof socks and Teva Proton water shoes when canoeing. My feet stay perfectly dry even when stepping in water over the tops of the socks. I carry this combination when backpacking to use as camp shoes and for fording streams. Again, feet stay dry. Never used the Sealskinz inside my boots, though.

    Sealskinz weigh 4 oz (size Med). Teva Protons weigh 15.4 oz.
    "In the mountains, there you feel free." T.S. Eliot

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-13-2003
    Location
    Smyrna, GA
    Age
    70
    Posts
    421

    Default

    I purchased some Sealskin socks also, but have not tried them with my trail runners, I know Sgt. had some...what experiences have people had with these....are they worth fooling with?

  18. #18
    Donating Member/AT Class of 2003 - The WET year
    Join Date
    09-27-2002
    Location
    Laramie, WY
    Age
    70
    Posts
    7,151
    Images
    90

    Default

    I tried Sealskins and the REI GorTex over socks and found them both to be rather uncomfortable inside shoes or boots. Now for kayaking it's a whole different story. I find them to be perfect for that application.
    The more I learn ...the more I realize I don't know.

  19. #19

    Default Teva Hurricanes

    I just got a pair of Teva Hurricanes which seem much lighter than the Tevas I wore out last year. Sorry I don't have an oz. scale but they are clearly less than a pound (as per my bathroom scale).

    They are specifically marketed for water use, not that that matters. Cheap ($29.97) from Campmor.

    Teva Hurricanes from Campmor

    I like Tevas. Flip flops (although lighter) kill my toes. Would also never ford a stream in flip flops. Forget it! Also had a pair of aquamocs which were light, but had no soles so you would die walking over a rocky trail to the privy or spring. Wouldn't want to ford a stream in them either.

    Pb

  20. #20
    Donating Member/AT Class of 2003 - The WET year
    Join Date
    09-27-2002
    Location
    Laramie, WY
    Age
    70
    Posts
    7,151
    Images
    90

    Default

    Just scored a pair of sandals today at Kmart that, for lack of a better description, resemble the ones sold by Adidas for "after soccer". They have a large velcro closure over the forefoot and a substantial sole. Got them home and popped them on the scale. A total of 13oz. Not bad for $7.99. The Merrell sandals that I used on the AT in 2001 weigh over a pound and a half and probably cost me $50.
    One of the nice things is that they are a slip on sandal and do not have the toe separator. Easy on and off in the campsite and for those occasional late night nature calls.
    The more I learn ...the more I realize I don't know.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •