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  1. #1
    Registered User hammock engineer's Avatar
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    Default Clothing options for South in Winter

    I am headed SOBO this summer. I am tring to buy all the clothes I will need and having them back home. That way someone can mail them to me, and I will not have to worry about buying later.

    So far I have mid weight top and bottoms, rain pants, rain jacket, socks, baclava, micro fleece top.

    Should I add some expedition weight top long under? I was also looking into 100/200 weight fleece pants, vest, top, or mittens. I know I will not need very much while hiking, but I will want more for when I stop. I want the option to put more clothes on versus climb into sleeping bag when I stop. I am also a cold weather wuess, and do not like being cold.

    Any suggestions or personal winter gear clothing lists?

  2. #2
    Registered User Rifleman's Avatar
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    Default Clothing Options for South in Winter

    Consider this for your sleeping bag liner, etc.
    http://www.backcountrygear.com/catal...ail.cfm/EXP155

    R.
    First things first!

    One-time Rights, hard copy and Internet. All Rights revert to author.

  3. #3
    Springer-->Stony Brook Road VT MedicineMan's Avatar
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    Default ever trust someone on the internet, trust me...

    get the Montbell Thermawrap Parka, the Vest and the Pants.....with the Parka and Vest you can survive serious cold, with the vest and a shell you'll do fine in mod. cold....you wont be able to hike in the pants unless you are very cold natured but you'll sleep in them, slack in camp in them, etc. Check out the tot. weight for all 3 pieces and you be surprised, you'll be shocked when you see the price for all 3 but remember that all 3 weigh as much as some peoples fleece jackets and these are much warmer and will insulate when wet.
    Start out slow, then slow down.

  4. #4

    Default

    Isn't microfleece the same thing as expedition weight which is the same as 100wt?

    I find that I am very warm while hiking and that I cool down slowly when I stop. I am also cold natured. I found I was able to hike at about 30 degrees (everything out side was forzen, my nalgene had ice crystals in it, the cap lightly froze shut) wearing very little.
    I had shorts, rain pants, a midweight capilene top, and a rain jacket. I also had heavy weight socks, a good warm hat, and fleece gloves with liners (for sweat).
    I only used my fleece pants when I stopped at the shelters each night. Even then, they were more luxury than necessity. I don't think you'll want to put them on during breaks, even if you get the sidezip ones.

    I had the following in the smokies and was fine.
    Rain jacket
    Rain pants
    Midweight top
    Midweight bottom
    Convertable pants (never actually used the legs)
    100wt fleece pullover
    Light down jacket
    Fleece pants
    Mountaineering socks
    Fleece hat
    Sock liners
    Fleece gloves and liner
    Gaiters

    I found that if I hiked and got all the capilene wet, I could put on the fleece pants/top and the down jacket while I dried the capilene. You can leave the fleece pants and be fine though.

  5. #5
    Registered User neo's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rifleman
    Consider this for your sleeping bag liner, etc.
    http://www.backcountrygear.com/catal...ail.cfm/EXP155

    R.

    i have an exped wallcreeper down a $230.00 i got it on sale over a year ago for $120.00,it is very versitle neo

    http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/...p?i=6135&c=577

  6. #6

    Default hey ham engine,

    ya know whats cool?having all the clothes with you be so light and compressable, that they can stay with you and no need for mail support.i dont get the support /planning trip everybodys on. the AT is easy enough and needs the chalange of no planning to make it a complete proteen.

  7. #7
    Registered User hammock engineer's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for the input. I am not trying to overplan, just save some money by shopping around now. I am going to be on a tight budget during my hike.

    I fell comfortable hiking with what I have know. I just don't want to go from hiking to in my sleeping bag.

    I like the thermarap, but the price is going to be a killer. Will have to put that one on the wish list for when I get a real job.

  8. #8

    Default

    I have a very similar list of clothing to TwoForty, without the fleece pants. They are all very versatile pieces. I'm a little nervous about being cold if it's under 20 degrees F, so I'm bringing an "emergency" pack of chemical handwarmers.

  9. #9

    Default

    $1.50 at REI.

    Quote Originally Posted by ncbookseller
    I have a very similar list of clothing to TwoForty, without the fleece pants. They are all very versatile pieces. I'm a little nervous about being cold if it's under 20 degrees F, so I'm bringing an "emergency" pack of chemical handwarmers.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ncbookseller
    $1.50 at REI.
    99c at Wally World


  11. #11
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    Default

    Some folks tend to stay warmer than others. If temps drop into the thirty degree range or colder at night, I've found it very nice to have some fleece pants to change into, especially if my hiking pants are damp and we don't have a campfire. They'll also extend the range of a sleeping bag if temperatures drop lower than anticipated. An insulated jacket of some sort also does the same, and it can double as a pillow if not needed for sleeping. Check for end of winter sales. Last winter I got a Sierra Designs lightweight insulated jacket for around $30 and it's great for layering and not too bulky.

  12. #12
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    Default

    Also, while some may feel comfortable wearing their sleeping bag as insulation like the Exped, or Jacks-R-Better, I look at these as last ditch emergency use only, especially for a long trip. If the weather is bad and I get my sleeping bag wet wearing it as a jacket, I no longer have a warm dry sleeping bag to fall back on to keep me from getting uncomfortably cold or hypothermic.

  13. #13
    Registered User hammock engineer's Avatar
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    Default

    I tend to agree with you on this one. I don't like to do anything that would jepordize my sleeping system.

    Just purchased some 100 weight fleece pants and a 200 weight fleece jacket. May not need it, but nice to have it a mail drop away.

    Going SOBO solo I am going to prepare myself to be alone a lot in the south towards the end of my trip. I may hate the couple extra pounds of clothing some days, but I'm sure I'll love them if I need them.

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