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  1. #1
    OffGrid BowGal's Avatar
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    Default Opinions on my gear

    Hi again.
    Two years ago, I would have never considered asking what others thought of my gear. Then again, my hikes were never more than 5-6 days...6-8x a year where I was t focused on a strenuous test like a thru hike attempt of the AT.
    Iím one year away from my attempt, and while I think Iíve done a fairly good job of putting together a gear list, I am open to suggestions. Iíve never hiked more than 60 miles in a week...so this will be totally new. This summer Iíll be doing many multi day hikes including a couple hikes of the Coastal Trail in Ontario...which is 120km.

    Here is my gear list...itís mostly complete. I know there maybe a few comments about a few items. Specifically:
    Inreach Explorer - as Iíll be in U.S. alone...no family or friends...and 1,500 miles away from home...I need those back in Canada to know Iím ok.
    Nanospikes - Iíve gone back and forth on these, but watching Youtube videos of the winter conditions especially in the Smokies...well, I want them. I can always send them home.

    https://lighterpack.com/r/7kdpc0
    We donít stop hiking because we grow old, we grow old because we stop hiking.
    - Finis Mitchell


    https://lighterpack.com/r/7kdpc0

  2. #2
    Registered User lonehiker's Avatar
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    Default

    Just a comment on the nanospikes. If you start on a reasonable date you will not need them.
    Lonehiker

  3. #3
    Registered User lonehiker's Avatar
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    I normally don't look at peoples gear lists. But, your gear list looks fine. Probably a few more clothes/socks than I would carry but you will figure out what you really need rather quickly. You mention that you've done 5-6 day trips before. This will simply be a string of that type of trip. The only thing different for me on a thru type hike vs a long backpacking trip is usually just the recharge/battery component and additional maps/guidebook pages. Otherwise what would be different?

    I don't see toilet paper on your list.
    Lonehiker

  4. #4

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    I avoid lighterpack, but I imagine your list is pretty standard. The big thing is to remain flexible, and utilize the (relatively) cheap USPS, people at home, and places like Amazon. Or simply hiker box something. There's no point in carrying gear you're not using, or being miserable because you're missing something. It's not like you're on a 6 month expedition with no support.

  5. #5
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    It looks like some items are listed in more than one category. If not I'd consider ditching some duplicates.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  6. #6
    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
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    Default

    What Feral Bill said. You have your Buff listed twice and a different weights. Your FAK is light, I would add a small tube of Super Glue for closing wounds. Also what is the tennis ball for?
    Blackheart

  7. #7
    OffGrid BowGal's Avatar
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    Ty for the comments thus far.
    Lonehiker - I’m planning for mid February. I’m only wanting the spikes as I’ve seen very icy conditions...albeit maybe only for a week or so.
    My list includes 3 pairs of socks - Toe sock/liner + darn tough that I hike in, another pair to alternate the next day. The third pair is a looser sock to sleep in.
    As for T.P., I ordered Wysi wipes? They’re small compressible wipes the size of a pill. They’re light, take up very little room. I figure a handful of those...then out rest in bounce box.

    BuckeyeBill - yes, I do have buffs listed twice. Thought if I lost one.
    I’ll pick up a super glue...good idea.
    Tennis ball is only listed for rolling out muscles. I see others with gadgets, but felt I could go more compact with just a ball. Good for rolling thighs...and bottoms of feet.

    FeralBill - I do have duplicates like base layer x2. I thought one pair for hiking, other for sleeping in. Or do need just one pair?
    Second buff I can eliminate
    We donít stop hiking because we grow old, we grow old because we stop hiking.
    - Finis Mitchell


    https://lighterpack.com/r/7kdpc0

  8. #8

    Default

    Tennis ball can be used to massage leg muscles and feet, although a golf ball is better for the feet. You can also use it to play fetch with an annoying dog.

    On a long hike I carry about a pound of extra odds and ends which might be handy to have at times, like a little sew kit, USB battery/charger, scissors, nail clippers, Liquid Bandage for blisters and such.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  9. #9
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    I personally like a set of sleep clothes. It keeps my sleeping bag cleaner and is nice to have something dry and clean-ish to get into in camp and to sleep in. Also, I often use my sleep clothes to change into before going into "civilization" or hitching a ride after a section after cleaning up a little.

    Anyone who really wants to go super UL will ditch the sleep layers, however. It's worth the ~10 ounces or so for me.

  10. #10
    Registered User lonehiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BowGal View Post
    Hi again.
    Two years ago, I would have never considered asking what others thought of my gear. Then again, my hikes were never more than 5-6 days...6-8x a year where I was t focused on a strenuous test like a thru hike attempt of the AT.
    I’m one year away from my attempt, and while I think I’ve done a fairly good job of putting together a gear list, I am open to suggestions. I’ve never hiked more than 60 miles in a week...so this will be totally new. This summer I’ll be doing many multi day hikes including a couple hikes of the Coastal Trail in Ontario...which is 120km.


    https://lighterpack.com/r/7kdpc0
    5-6 day trips 6-8 times a year! You are 1/3 of the way there. Don't over complicate this.
    Lonehiker

  11. #11

    Default

    I think you'll experience wet cold feet and cold in the Rev 20* quilt sleep system.

  12. #12

    Default

    I think you'll experience wet cold feet and cold in the Rev 20* quilt sleep system.

    Show me I'm wrong. Tell me what you're going to do if when this occurs. How are you going to prevent it?

  13. #13
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    Thatís a fine list, youíll be ok.

    Bring the spikes if youíre worried and mail me home later.

    Youíre bringing redundancies but I have a bunch I wonít be able to talk you out of them.

    After a couple weeks youíll know what works and after a few months youíll laugh at how differently you looked at Gear now.

    Donít bring the esbit stove.

    Swapping pairs of socks is kinda useless because then youíll just have two pair of dirty socks. I carried 3 pair also; 1 sleep 2 hiking but hardly ever used the second hiking pair unless it was a day I was walking into town or just really needed a morale boost.

    Carrying extra of anything ďin case you lose itĒ is kinda just wrong unless itís an emergency item. You can always get another at the next town.

    If itís in your budget you could go lighter with your tent. If not that one will work fine.

    Donít sweat it too much, just get on out there and itíll work itself out

  14. #14
    OffGrid BowGal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    I think you'll experience wet cold feet and cold in the Rev 20* quilt sleep system.
    Well, my sleep pad is R3.2. Quilt is 850 down, rated for 20F. Every video I’ve seen comparing quilt to down sleeping bag is that you’re carrying extra weight of a sleeping bag with little benefit. Plus, I don’t like being all twisted in a sleeping bag.
    We donít stop hiking because we grow old, we grow old because we stop hiking.
    - Finis Mitchell


    https://lighterpack.com/r/7kdpc0

  15. #15
    OffGrid BowGal's Avatar
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    So I’m ditching:
    Esbit stove 142g
    Nanospikes 224g
    2nd buff 42g

    While I’d love to entertain getting a lighter tent, my Marmot 2P UL is only two years old. I love the extra room inside...don’t feel cocooned like a 1P.
    Looked seriously at a hammock system, but I got panic attacks looking at the knots, rope...I’m not good with that...especially if I have cold hands.
    We donít stop hiking because we grow old, we grow old because we stop hiking.
    - Finis Mitchell


    https://lighterpack.com/r/7kdpc0

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BowGal View Post
    Well, my sleep pad is R3.2. Quilt is 850 down, rated for 20F. Every video I’ve seen comparing quilt to down sleeping bag is that you’re carrying extra weight of a sleeping bag with little benefit. Plus, I don’t like being all twisted in a sleeping bag.
    I have the Revelation 30F but I wouldn't push it down to that rating. I think that the rating is optimistic . In fact I'm taking my zpacks 10F quilt on a trip this week where the low temps are expected to be around 30. But Much depends on how cold you sleep. Women typically require a warmer bag than men. Starting in mid February is full winter conditions and temps could easily get well below 20F.

  17. #17
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    I think you'll experience wet cold feet and cold in the Rev 20* quilt sleep system.

    Show me I'm wrong. Tell me what you're going to do if when this occurs. How are you going to prevent it?
    In February and March? I totally agree.
    Convince us that you are the lone woman on earth who sleeps hot.
    2018 has been a year of knee to waist deep snow. That may have only been a day or two. However, spikes are pretty useless in deep snow.
    Someone could make a few bucks renting snowshoes.
    Your experience is much better than most folks starting the AT. Shucks, youíre ready for the CDT.
    Wayne

  18. #18
    OffGrid BowGal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee View Post
    I have the Revelation 30F but I wouldn't push it down to that rating. I think that the rating is optimistic . In fact I'm taking my zpacks 10F quilt on a trip this week where the low temps are expected to be around 30. But Much depends on how cold you sleep. Women typically require a warmer bag than men. Starting in mid February is full winter conditions and temps could easily get well below 20F.
    Yeah, Iíve been reading of the cold temps...almost single digits.
    I really donít want to look at another system as my new quilt hasnít been used yet. Would a silk liner or other sleeping bag liner help? Really hate to use one as I get all twisted in them.
    We donít stop hiking because we grow old, we grow old because we stop hiking.
    - Finis Mitchell


    https://lighterpack.com/r/7kdpc0

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by BowGal View Post
    Yeah, I’ve been reading of the cold temps...almost single digits.
    I really don’t want to look at another system as my new quilt hasn’t been used yet. Would a silk liner or other sleeping bag liner help? Really hate to use one as I get all twisted in them.
    One idea I had (but haven't acted on) to extend my 30F Revelation is to purchase down pants. My thinking was that down pants, coupled with my Montbell down parka, could possibly extend my quilt at least down to its rating of 30F or possibly into the mid 20s. I contacted GooseFeet gear and they were helpful and quoted me a price (I believe around $160).

    I can't use liners myself because I get all twisted up in them. And I'm not sure they add that much warmth.

    Don't get me wrong, I think that the Revelation is a great quilt and I like mine but I'd probably carry a 10F if I expected temps down to 20F. In other words, maybe add 10 degrees to the advertised rating to get to a "comfort" rating. I think that would be worth the extra weight penalty. If your Revelation has never been used then maybe they would exchange it for a 10F?

  20. #20
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    Default

    I would leave at home:
    bear hanging kit (put your food bag in your sleeping bag with you) - not a current popular choice so disregard if too extreme
    tennis ball
    footprint
    trowel
    sawyer gravity filter

    I would take the nanospikes and send them home after Smokies
    Let me go

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