Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1

    Default 100 Mile Wilderness Advice

    Hello all, great forum. Been doing lots of research here and want to express much appreciation in advance...

    I am planning doing the HMW northbound with my daughter. I am limited to end of August to mid September 2018 to do the trip and am planning for 8-10 days. Is there any special considerations during this time or section I should be aware of? Also, looking at the temperature trends in that time(roughly high 30's to mid 70's, i think), I am looking at 20 degree bags such as the BA Skeeter 20, Nemo Sonic, etc...am I looking at the correct range?

    We are both in pretty good shape, I'm 52 yoa retired Army and she's a 22 yoa firefighter/paramedic....should be a life changing adventure

    Many more questions to follow I'm sure...

    Thx and be safe

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-27-2003
    Location
    northern whites
    Posts
    3,904

    Default

    Odds are good 40 degree bags supplemented with the clothes in the pack will be adequate. Temps during the day can be hot in August and early September.

    Its going to be real busy until the labor day weekend. Dont plan on shelters Lot to be said for going southbound from Abol Bridge as it lets you get your trail legs before the steep stuff starting at the ascent of White Cap. Consider paying to place a food cache.

  3. #3
    illabelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-25-2012
    Location
    Lurkerville, East Tn
    Age
    59
    Posts
    3,285
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    You didn't mention Katahdin. Coming allllll the way from SE Florida, surely you plan to climb the Greatest Mountain? If that's part of the plan, there's a lot to learn about.

    The HMW is beautiful and fun.

  4. #4
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-03-2002
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Age
    62
    Posts
    5,433
    Images
    558

    Default

    The HMW is fairly low elevation. In early September I would probably opt for 30-degree bags. The trail is lovely through this section. You can almost certainly cover the mileage in 8 days, but you might want a few days of buffer to spend along a wilderness pond or something. However, the need to bring more food makes the early going a lot harder unless you can arrange for a re-supply from one of the Monson hostels at Jo Mary Road (not sure if they are doing that anymore).

    I treasure the two extended backpacking trips I did with my 20-something daughter in North Carolina. Good luck!
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

  5. #5

    Default

    Great time to be in the Maine woods!
    You'll find water crossings low, unless there's been storms.
    Warm days and cool nights, and you're past the buggy months. You camp at low elevations, a 30 degree bag will serve.
    As you know, hiking in from Monson qualifies you to stay at the Long Distance hiker site in Baxter.
    If you do, or don't, climb Katahdin there's a shuttle run by the AT Lodge that runs out of Katahdin Stream
    each day about 4-4:30 that takes you out to Millinocket. Small fee if you're not staying with them.
    Shaw's in Monson and the AT Lodge can help you with lodgistics, great people.
    More info: The Nobo’s guide to Baxter and Katahdin for 2018
    Teej

    "[ATers] represent three percent of our use and about twenty percent of our effort," retired Baxter Park Director Jensen Bissell.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Meenkya View Post
    Hello all, great forum. Been doing lots of research here and want to express much appreciation in advance...

    I am planning doing the HMW northbound with my daughter. I am limited to end of August to mid September 2018 to do the trip and am planning for 8-10 days. Is there any special considerations during this time or section I should be aware of? Also, looking at the temperature trends in that time(roughly high 30's to mid 70's, i think), I am looking at 20 degree bags such as the BA Skeeter 20, Nemo Sonic, etc...am I looking at the correct range?

    We are both in pretty good shape, I'm 52 yoa retired Army and she's a 22 yoa firefighter/paramedic....should be a life changing adventure

    Many more questions to follow I'm sure...

    Thx and be safe
    I hiked the Hundred Mile Wilderness in August a few years ago. That particular year was really wet. It was extremely hot and muggy. The remains of a hurricane passed thru and it rained for 24 hours straight. It rained several inches over night. The trail was muddy, the humidity was unbearable and even the nights were hot. I swore that I will never hike it in August again. It was so miserable that I called Katahdin Air to pick us up at White House Landing and quit the hike in the middle.

    Based on my own experiences September and early October are the best times to hike the Hundred Mile Wilderness. The bugs are gone. The leaves begin to turn and hiking is great.

    Again, based just on my own experience, I couldn't make as many miles per day in the Hundred Mile Wilderness as I make hiking elsewhere. The trip I mentioned in August was planned to be a 7 day trip. I found it really hard to keep up the 14 miles a day schedule in the rain.

    All that being said, The Hundred Mile Wilderness will be a great experience for you. The chances of having another August like the one I had are not great. I have hiked all or part of the HMW six different years. I keep going back. It is my favorite east coast hike. And, you chances of seeing wildlife are great. I have seen one or more moose every time. I love listening to the loons when I am camped.
    Shutterbug

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Meenkya View Post
    Hello all, great forum. Been doing lots of research here and want to express much appreciation in advance...

    I am planning doing the HMW northbound with my daughter. I am limited to end of August to mid September 2018 to do the trip and am planning for 8-10 days. Is there any special considerations during this time or section I should be aware of? Also, looking at the temperature trends in that time(roughly high 30's to mid 70's, i think), I am looking at 20 degree bags such as the BA Skeeter 20, Nemo Sonic, etc...am I looking at the correct range?

    We are both in pretty good shape, I'm 52 yoa retired Army and she's a 22 yoa firefighter/paramedic....should be a life changing adventure

    Many more questions to follow I'm sure...

    Thx and be safe
    Let me add, doing the HMW with your adult daughter will be a great experience. I have three daughters. I have taken each of them on backpacking trips. They were great "bonding" experiences.
    Shutterbug

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2014
    Location
    Lower 48
    Age
    38
    Posts
    63

    Default

    So much fun. I'll just throw out a few tidbits.

    If you include Katahdin (and hopefully you will) it's 120 miles. If you stop at Abol Bridge then it's 100 miles. Shaw's in Monson will meet you in the middle to bring you supplies and take out your trash for a fee. I'd give that some strong consideration.

    At the beginning are two ranges of peaks: Barren Mountain and Whitecap Mountain. Barren and it's subpeaks are tough and rugged. Whitecap and it's subpeaks are easy, relatively speaking. From there to Abol Bridge is nearly all flat (with a few minor climbs).

    There are numerous places to pitch a tent. I went at a similar time and there were quite a few AT hikers out. So I tented each night.

    At Abol Bridge (where the 100mw ends) is a commercial campground and also a state of Maine campground. The Maine one is first come first serve. The commercial one isn't exactly ideal (I didn't enjoy it). But you can get a shower and an all you can eat breakfast though.

    If you decide to hike Katahdin you can stay at the Birches in Baxter State Park for a fee or alternately if you can plan which date you would arrive you can reserve a spot at Katahdin Stream Campground which is right at the Katahdin trailhead. I would go that route if you can.

    Do Katahdin! It is such a fantastic mountain to climb.

  9. #9

    Default

    Wow, thank you for the replies...I didn't think it was possible to get more excited about this trip. My daughter and I are thinking that we will be doing something like this every couple years or so. It is truly a blessing.

    Because we will be doing this more than once, I am applying the buy once cry once rule for upcoming gear purchases. Basically getting everything, lol

    My apologies for not making clear such a crucial point, but we are absolutely doing that Greatest Mountain! I want to keep the trip to no more than 110 miles, but definitely over 100 and a Katahdin finish.

    Thanks again for the warm and informative replies. You have giving me many aspects to look into. Research is a bit of the fun for me and I'm a bit of a gear guy so its great to see the amazing evolution of gear since growing up hiking in the Sierra Nevadas and "the lastest high speed gear" of the military. It looks like early to mid Sept will be the time. Will look into 30-40 degree bags. We will be using a tent most of the time if not all the time. I personally can't imagine I would enjoy the shelter experience, but I can adapt....lol

    I will try to dole out my questions at a reasonable rate, so apologies in advance.

    What is the norm for ending the trip at Katahdin? Is there a shuttle/ride/service back to Monson? Assuming a call to Shaws may give me all the info needed...

    Thx again and be safe all...

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2014
    Location
    Lower 48
    Age
    38
    Posts
    63

    Default

    Shaw's will pick you up right at Katahdin Stream Campground (which is where the Katahdin hike would end) for a modest cost. Actually what we did was park our car at Shaw's, they drove us to the Monson trailhead (just up the road), we hiked, and they picked us up at Katahdin and drove us back to Shaw's where we had our car parked the whole time. Call them for their prices. I think all in all we paid less than $200 for the transportation and parking.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Meenkya View Post
    What is the norm for ending the trip at Katahdin?
    The Nobo’s guide to Baxter and Katahdin for 2018
    Teej

    "[ATers] represent three percent of our use and about twenty percent of our effort," retired Baxter Park Director Jensen Bissell.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-21-2008
    Location
    Bangor, Maine
    Posts
    172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Meenkya View Post
    Wow, thank you for the replies...I didn't think it was possible to get more excited about this trip. My daughter and I are thinking that we will be doing something like this every couple years or so. It is truly a blessing.

    Because we will be doing this more than once, I am applying the buy once cry once rule for upcoming gear purchases. Basically getting everything, lol

    My apologies for not making clear such a crucial point, but we are absolutely doing that Greatest Mountain! I want to keep the trip to no more than 110 miles, but definitely over 100 and a Katahdin finish.

    Thanks again for the warm and informative replies. You have giving me many aspects to look into. Research is a bit of the fun for me and I'm a bit of a gear guy so its great to see the amazing evolution of gear since growing up hiking in the Sierra Nevadas and "the lastest high speed gear" of the military. It looks like early to mid Sept will be the time. Will look into 30-40 degree bags. We will be using a tent most of the time if not all the time. I personally can't imagine I would enjoy the shelter experience, but I can adapt....lol

    I will try to dole out my questions at a reasonable rate, so apologies in advance.

    What is the norm for ending the trip at Katahdin? Is there a shuttle/ride/service back to Monson? Assuming a call to Shaws may give me all the info needed...

    Thx again and be safe all...
    Since you are planning to do trips like this every couple years or so, and only want to "cry once" with gear purchases, It could make sense to go ahead and get the 20 degree bag. If it is warm, you can always unzip and use as a quilt. On future trips, you may be glad to have it rather than wearing more layers or using a liner to stay warm. There is a chance you will want it in mid-September in Maine.

    Definitely a good idea to finish with Katahdin. If you need to shave miles from the start to make sure that you have enough time to finish, it is possible to get dropped off at a side trail that joins the AT near the base of Barren mountain, (about 15 miles northbound of Monson.) From this point, the summit of Katahdin is 99 miles away. The hike from the summit is around 5 miles, so you're over 100 under 110. Shaw's and Lakeshore House in Monson can give you more info I'm sure.

    The norm for ending a trip at Katahdin is to shuttle or hitchhike to Millinocket. If you need to get back to Monson, a shuttle will be the easiest way, again, Shaw's and Lakeshore House will have the current info.

    Good luck, have fun!

  13. #13
    Registered User KDogg's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-30-2015
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    267

    Default

    The 100 mile was one of my favorite parts of my thru. I found the southern half to be much more difficult than the northern part and would recommend that you plan your mileage accordingly. We jammed through in 5 days but I would have loved to have spent longer.

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-27-2003
    Location
    northern whites
    Posts
    3,904

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KDogg View Post
    The 100 mile was one of my favorite parts of my thru. I found the southern half to be much more difficult than the northern part and would recommend that you plan your mileage accordingly. We jammed through in 5 days but I would have loved to have spent longer.
    I agree completely, many thruhikers get summit fever and in rush to make it to the summit they rush through the 100MW. All sorts of places to stop and enjoy the view. The Antlers campsite is almost worth a zero day. Gulf Hagas although it doesn't live up to its hype, is still is worth a couple of hour detour. If you arrange for a food drop then the logistics are a lot easier. I haven't been up to check it out but I believe one of the AMC camps is close enough to the trail to make a detour for a luxury night (showers, beds and meals). Note sure if they offer to hold packages for hikers.

  15. #15

    Default

    Shaw's looks like my goto, lots of info, answered questions, and planning assistance thanks for that...awesome

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •