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  1. #1

    Default adjustable tent pole (not trekking pole) for SMD Lunar Solo

    Newbie to the forum, so my apologies if there's a thread covering this that I've not found yet.....

    I'm preparing to buy my first single-wall shelter and have settled on a SMD Lunar Solo. Before pulling the trigger, I need to finalize my choice of vertical support. I have, but don't want to carry, trekking poles. I could buy SMD's 48-inch tent pole, but I wonder whether a fixed pole length will limit my ability to pitch the tent (esp. the front vestibule) lower to the ground when I want to do so.

    This leads me to two questions:
    1. Is this a real problem that people encounter with this tent, or am I just imagining it to be one? How do users with the SMD pole create a low pitch at the front?
    2. Has anyone looked for and found adjustable-height tent poles in the 48-inch range? I've looked a bit, and most seem to be 6-8 feet.


    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2

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    Mountain Laurel Designs sells a "pole jack" that can be used to adjust pole length I believe.

    https://mountainlaureldesigns.com/pr...m-poles-jacks/

  3. #3
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    no hurry the lunar solo is out of stock right now anyway

  4. #4
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    Default

    The SMD lunar Solo is little like the MLD SoloMid XL which I use in inclement weather. I also use the MLD Duomid and Locus Gear Khufu, both mids. They all have a separate floor or inner if I even take one. I use many tarp set ups and tarp tents. I started amassing a collection of different length collapsable bungeed CF poles for various manufacturer's designs and for different configurations. I've found it's easiest to address this in two ways: 1) an absolute optimal height collapsable CF pole for the tent/tarp and then angling the pole to change ventilation, apex height, interior volume, floor space, pitch set up, roof angle, etc. If need be I may dig a slight hole in the ground where the pole resides. 2) utilize Komperdell Ultralite Carbon Vario 4 that adjust between 120 cm - 145 cm that satisfy every mid tent pole requirement I need

  5. #5

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    Yep, just angle the pole off a bit to reduce height.

    Or use a stick.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  6. #6

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    Each day through my window I watch hikers as they pass on by
    I say to myself you're such a lucky guy
    To have a pole like you is truly a dream come true
    Out of all the poles in the world this one belongs to me
    But it was just my imagination
    Runnin' away with me
    It was just my imagination runnin' away with me

  7. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lively or Not View Post
    ... have settled on a SMD Lunar Solo. Before pulling the trigger, I need to finalize my choice of vertical support. I have, but don't want to carry, trekking poles. I could buy SMD's 48-inch tent pole, but I wonder whether a fixed pole length will limit my ability to pitch the tent (esp. the front vestibule) lower to the ground when I want to do so.
    Out of curiosity, if you're willing to carry a dedicated pole for the tent, what is your objection to carrying one of your trekking poles, which (assuming they're collapsible) could be stored similarly on your pack, and could serve the same purpose? Are they not collapsible?

  8. #8

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    A carbon fiber pole is quite a bit lighter than a trekking pole. If you're not actually planning to use trekking poles to hike with, why carry them?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    A carbon fiber pole is quite a bit lighter than a trekking pole. If you're not actually planning to use trekking poles to hike with, why carry them?

    Carry them because it's part of the necessary hiking ensemble indicating you're a serious hiker...They always save wt too.

  10. #10

    Default

    I saw a DIY version of this using some PVC pipe and wondered whether anyone made a commercial version.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by trailmercury View Post
    Mountain Laurel Designs sells a "pole jack" that can be used to adjust pole length I believe.

    https://mountainlaureldesigns.com/pr...m-poles-jacks/
    Sorry for the duplicate; I forgot to reply with quote. As I said, I've seen a DIY version of this.... etc.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    no hurry the lunar solo is out of stock right now anyway
    Yes, but due back in stock "early July."

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    The SMD lunar Solo is little like the MLD SoloMid XL which I use in inclement weather. I also use the MLD Duomid and Locus Gear Khufu, both mids. They all have a separate floor or inner if I even take one. I use many tarp set ups and tarp tents. I started amassing a collection of different length collapsable bungeed CF poles for various manufacturer's designs and for different configurations. I've found it's easiest to address this in two ways: 1) an absolute optimal height collapsable CF pole for the tent/tarp and then angling the pole to change ventilation, apex height, interior volume, floor space, pitch set up, roof angle, etc. If need be I may dig a slight hole in the ground where the pole resides. 2) utilize Komperdell Ultralite Carbon Vario 4 that adjust between 120 cm - 145 cm that satisfy every mid tent pole requirement I need
    Digging a hole is an adaptation I'd not considered....

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    Yep, just angle the pole off a bit to reduce height.

    Or use a stick.
    Right. I certainly get the principle. So how much of a pole angle is needed to lower the vestibule to an inch or two from the ground? I know that pulling the guyline in toward the tent body will also help lower the vestibule height, but it's not clear to me how big a role the pole height plays relative to the stake-out location for the vestibule guyline.

    Normally I wouldn't be too picky about a detail like this, but in all the videos & photos I've seen of the SMD tent, that front vestibule seems to ride pretty high off the ground, which I know I wouldn't always want.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    Yep, just angle the pole off a bit to reduce height.

    Or use a stick.
    Certainly, but where I'm headed (US northern plains), I won't always have ready access to limbs, etc.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Time Zone View Post
    Out of curiosity, if you're willing to carry a dedicated pole for the tent, what is your objection to carrying one of your trekking poles, which (assuming they're collapsible) could be stored similarly on your pack, and could serve the same purpose? Are they not collapsible?
    What @CalebJ said. Also, in the interest of full disclosure, while I've done a lot of backpacking during my years in north Georgia, I'm preparing for a 1500 mile bicycle tour next year. This particular question is more easily answered among a backpacking audience than a bikepacking one, IME. Accordingly, I'd like to avoid hauling the slightly bulkier trekking pole if a tent pole will meet my needs.

  17. #17
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    if you have no other use for the stick, the tents designed around them may not be what you want and it is nice to have the option of full mesh

    https://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/sh...8_10000001_-1_

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    A carbon fiber pole is quite a bit lighter than a trekking pole. If you're not actually planning to use trekking poles to hike with, why carry them?
    Ah, carbon fiber. I didn't think of that. Well, there are carbon fiber hiking poles too, but yeah, the handle, if nothing else, will likely make the trekking pole heavier.

    FWIW, one can do a "mid" shelter design with a tarp that could is supported by cordage from above (and stakes), rather than a pole. For a tent like the Lunar Solo, you'd need a way to affix the cordage to the intended peak area - perhaps tucking something like a ping-pong ball or smooth stone in there and wrapping cordage around it (e.g., clove-hitch) and then the other end to a branch or tree. And you lose the bar in front of your door. Not sure it works as well though, and of course, it limits your chosen spots.

    Anyway, cordage isn't weightless either so I'm not sure it is better than a thin CF pole.

  19. #19
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    No trekking poles...
    But maybe something like this is not a bad solution :
    http://www.blackdiamondequipment.com...12206_cfg.html
    your size (41-49") is a bit less than 8oz however you should be able to drop at least 2 oz by removing the handle/strap and basket.
    Note that they collapse to 15".
    You need to buy a pair but maybe you can find a mate that wants one.

  20. #20
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    What kind of bike trip? If it's say along the coastal west or where many trees are and if the SMD Lunar Solo has an apex loop set up under a low hanging branch and adjust the height that way with a guyout.

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