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  1. #21
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    This will get you started thinking in the right direction. Donít know where you are, but college towns have consignment and second hand stores. Goodwill and Salvation Army Stores for trail clothes, maybe some gear.
    REI Garage Sales can be a gear gold mine. Or a complete waste of time. Get there real early.

    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Buy the backpack LAST.
    When you have EVERYTHING else on hand shop for a backpack.
    Walmart, Amazon, Academy Sports, etc. will have suitable 50 liter - 70 liter packs new and available for fitting. Usually under $100. Sometimes WAY less.
    WhiteBlaze For Sale occasionally has the suitable older ugly duckling pack in your price range.
    Thrift Stores, college students, Craigís list, etc. are places to look. Garage sales too.
    Good luck!
    Wayne
    Wayne

  2. #22
    Registered User NJdreamer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FIREWHATFIRE View Post
    Where would I find this post of site for that info?
    Go to https://thetrek.co

    Look for the Appalachian trail article, how I saved 2000 dollars on my gear...it will be down the bottom of the page. The article had suggestions that were new to me, and I thought I knew where to look already.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Just love being outside, not sure why. 765 AT miles done (2014-2018), many more to go.

  3. #23
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    I bought my daughter a Rhyolite 45L from outdoor vitals when she expressed interest in doing some backpacking trips with me. I think I paid $75 dollars for it. She loved it and said it felt great on her and carried the weight well. I have actually used it on a couple of solo trips just to see what I thought about it. I was amazed when it felt more comfortable than my $300 pack and carried the weight much better. I have actually used it for about 200 miles of hiking and it is holding up well. Maybe worth looking at.

  4. #24
    Registered User Last Call's Avatar
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    I've been pleased with my Jansport Klamath55, just looked on amazon they changed the color from gold to blue, grey is also available... newer model looks like it has hip belt pockets, $99 with shipping....carries comfortably.
    Let's head for the roundhouse; they can't corner us there!

  5. #25
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Brands that can usually be trusted used. If they arenít trashed. In no particular order.
    OSPREY
    GREGORY
    REI
    THE NORTH FACE
    JANSPORT
    KELTY
    MOUNTAINSMITH
    ULA
    There are probably more, but those are brands that Iím familiar with and/or have owned.
    Wayne

  6. #26
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    You can also look at:

    https://www.aliexpress.com/w/wholesa...-backpack.html

    for a tarp try polycro window film and shock cord.

    Lighter and absorbs less water than tyvek.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJdreamer View Post
    Go to https://thetrek.co

    Look for the Appalachian trail article, how I saved 2000 dollars on my gear...it will be down the bottom of the page. The article had suggestions that were new to me, and I thought I knew where to look already.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

    That is good advice.

  8. #28
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Eddie Valiant: "That lame-brain freeway idea could only be cooked up by a toon."
    https://wayne-ayearwithbigfootandbubba.blogspot.com
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  9. #29
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    FIREWHATFIRE isn't looking to spend $2,500 on gear.

    Snippet of my gear list showing prices and savings.

    Wayne

    Eddie Valiant: "That lame-brain freeway idea could only be cooked up by a toon."
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  10. #30
    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
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    You have received some great advice already. If your aren't planning to go for 5-6 years, I would hold off on the major (Money) items until a year or two from your departure date. Technology and prices change quickly and you may be able to pickup a top of the line pack, quilts, and other gear in a few years. Also Over the course of time some businesses will no longer exist and then you are lacking a place to go for customer service.
    Blackheart

  11. #31
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    I generally agree with BuckeyeBill on this one - wait, at least for some things. For instance, polyurethane (PU) coated fabrics age over time and the coating can flake off and sometimes smell terrible. If you're on a tight budget, and buying used, you may want to wait to buy any PU-coated items - no point in letting them age another 5-6 years before you really need them.

    BTW, you might want to look into the waterproofness of Tyvek ... IIRC, it's not actually waterproof. There are different grades of Tyvek, but I think they're mostly water-resistant. Not sure if that would suffice for your needs. A cheap alternative would be a 10x10 blue tarp from Walmart, Northern Tool, Harbor Freight, etc. It'd be a little noisy and maybe bulky, but it's cheap and would do the job for a season. They deteriorate with age as well, though - 3-4 year life, I'd say - so don't buy one now.

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  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by FIREWHATFIRE View Post
    Money is always tight and in trying to plan ahead I have a question or 2.

    Is there and unremarkable brand that does the job as well as the high priced ones?

    What would do the job adequately without making the trip miserable.
    Another thought - these two questions have different answers.

    Is there an unremarkable brand that does the job as well as high-priced ones? In a way, not really, if you take into account pack weight, weight transfer, features, durability, etc.

    Doing "the job adequately without making the trip miserable" is quite within reach, however. It may just not be a high-end pack. Plenty of unremarkable packs will carry your stuff.

    Once you get your stuff together, you can shop for a pack that will carry it. On a tight budget, gear tends to be a little heavier and bulkier, so you may need a larger pack than those who can drop big bucks on UL equipment that is light and packs small. And that's OK. The important thing is that it carries your stuff well, and ought to last. So if you see a gear list for a few thousand dollars and a 40-50L pack, well, you may need something closer to 65L or so. Perhaps a used Kelty Trekker, for instance, would suit you. I often see them in online classifieds for $50-$60. They'd likely be durable and weight transfer should be excellent; replacement parts (shoulder straps, hip belt) are readily available if something happens. I don't know that the pack bag is available as a replacement, however, so again, I'd wait to buy. You don't want it going funky before you head out. There are cheap no-name internal frame packs that could be had new for the same price, but IDK if they would last well. I've seen some startlingly inexpensive ones that look legit (Aldi's Adventuridge, $30), but who knows - if the shoulder strap stitching fails, it could be a false economy. Mainstream internal frame packs could be found used too; I'd have a greater confidence that they're made to a sufficiently high standard.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuckeyeBill View Post
    You have received some great advice already. If your aren't planning to go for 5-6 years, I would hold off on the major (Money) items until a year or two from your departure date. Technology and prices change quickly and you may be able to pickup a top of the line pack, quilts, and other gear in a few years. Also Over the course of time some businesses will no longer exist and then you are lacking a place to go for customer service.
    This is really sound advice.

    A couple-three things are going on.

    First, a lot more gear is being sold.

    Second, a really robust used gear market is growing.

    Third, a lot of evolution is going on.

    That combination leads to dropping prices for excellent used gear óand I would expect prices to continue to drop.

    850 loft down that used to have a premium price is really dropping in price. I expect it to be where 650 loft down is now (in the extremely cheap range instead of near premium) in a couple more years.

    Tent prices for used tents are leasing the way (I know, you are a tarp & hammock guy, just using this as an example). Tent pegs are in a similar place.

    Cook systems are headed that way.

    Wool clothing is now a Costco item. Iím surprised by how good the socks turned out to be.

    These trends can be expected to continue.

  14. #34

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    The Trail is such an interesting mix of multi-millionaires and people who can't rub two nickels together.
    I think it's hilarious.

  15. #35
    Registered User scope's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FIREWHATFIRE View Post
    ...I already have a hammock(with straps and carabiners) and compressible blanket I found a deal on for sleeping. I picked up both for $21. Looking at Tyvek house wrap for rain cover(free from construction site)
    Something notable missing from your shelter/insulation. Is probably a cheap option, just want to make sure you don't forget it.

    Backpacks are still kind of something that is hard to make real cheap. My guess is you're better off getting a very well used backpack at a price point that works for you. I'd buy it in person in order to inspect it real good. Probably stinks, but should soon stink like you. Otherwise, a very good pack can be had for around $100, maybe less, brand new. Nice Garnite Gear one has been on Massdrop for a while now.

    I would keep in mind that you're probably going to turn over 90% of your gear by year 5 from now, especially given that nothing is new, or is sold at a steap discount for a reason, or both. Might be a you can pay me now or pay me later sort of thing. Nothing wrong with going cheap at first and then having a better idea of exactly what you want for your thru.

    And I think doing the Pinhoti is an excellent idea.
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
    - Kate Chopin

  16. #36

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    Have used an Alice pack and currently using a large Molle pack. Yeah, it is a bit heavy and there is an art to loading it but for strength and durability for the price it is hard to beat.
    I have used commercial packs but what drove me back to .mil gear was all the outside attachment points. It is so easy to hang often used items on the sides. Molle has the compression straps so I can scrunch it down tight and still allow a cavern to carry things if needed.

  17. #37

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    I used to loathe "financially tight budget" threads. I have come to really enjoy them now. To see the result of someone so confident in their beliefs of still obtaining quality while pinching a penny will undoubtedly always result in a crash landing with reality. Yes people have walked the trail with a shower curtain and 1930's rucksack. But those people were tough, in a tough world. (This is going to spark a new thread just a heads up). I am a firm believer that as time goes on several things happen. Our world, as a whole, becomes softer. And less intelligent. If you want to see the effects of cheap gear, it only takes a weekend trip to Springer mountain in March. The trail will be littered with crap gear and quitters. The closest I have seen to getting by with cheap stuff was 2 years ago when Kyle Rohrig walked all the way to NH with a military radio backpack. It finally fell apart in Hanover I believe and he got a real pack. At which time he said he could not believe how much he had cheated himself of a comfortable pack the whole trip. I walked for a week several years ago with a sobo that had carried a skateboard backpack all the way from Maine to SNP. When I got home I mailed him an extra pack I had in the closet.

    Thru hike 5-6 years out. I would save my money and the year before I leave I would be scouring WB, Ebay and other online consignment for the best lightly used gear I could find. Zpacks, Western Mountaineering, Tarptent etc. Find the items used for a week long trip that people found out they don't like backpacking and gather that gear up.

    When its piss pouring rain for a week, the Tyvek idea is probably gunna make you really upset. "Well it looked good on paper" will come to mind....

    In memory of nice things
    Trail Miles: 3,978.2 - AT Trips: 70
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 59.0
    BMT Map: 57.7
    Pinhoti Trail Map: 0.0

  18. #38

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    I like my Teton. I bought it used off eBay for $40. It is Abit heavy at 4 lbs but it carries weight well. With 5 years you have lots of time to look for good deals on gear.

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