Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 46
  1. #21

    Default

    And I'd go with that Dutch starter package in a heartbeat... FAR superior to the two choices in the first post. Many experienced hammock folks could be happy with that.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  2. #22

    Default

    Me I'm a Cottage Vendor Kinda Guy.

    I would go with any of the vendors like Dutchware, Dream Hammock, Wilderness Logics, Hammock Gear, Warbonnet.

    I have a Dream Sparrow, and a Wilderness Night Owl. My tarp is a Hammock Gear Winter Palace, and their Underquilts.

    Very happy.

    (if a Bridge Hammock I would strongly suggest the Ridge Runner from Warbonnet...

  3. #23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by connolm View Post
    Tremendous thanks for all the suggestions! I'm grateful for you time and thoughtful responses.

    in no particular order:


    The group hang in Goshen is nearby! I'm on the the North Shore from Boston. I should try to swing by. Get it... "Swing?" Hello? Is this thing on?

    As for Hammockforums.net... I signed up the other day. You think I should paste my original query as my very first posting? I was pondering doing so. I posted here first because I have some other posts and history here. I thought this crowd would be more savvy to weight and bulk considerations due to the backpacking aspect.


    As for underquilt... I wasn't kidding about fair-weather camping. Under the conditions I'm considering using this, it will be July, August, and maybe September. Temps in 70's-80's. At night. In high humidity. And if I get into shoulder seasons, I'll take one of my many air pads and use it half inflated. I'll figure out the quilting next year in high season.

    Please keep the comments coming!

    What's the Dutchgear return policy? I can't find it on their site.


    Group Hang!! Heck yes!! I would definitely suggest swinging on by, and hanging out (taps mike... eh-hehm.... HelLo... LOL!) No substitute for being able to put yourself in the hammock and "see" what someone is talking about...




    Figure out the underquilt thing when you decide it's time has come - no sweat - (taps mike again... is this thing on?)



    You'll probably have to call Dutchgear & ask about their return policy.


    I will offer - in my experience, with gathered end hammocks - that the lighter weight the fabric, the more it can 'squeeze' you, across a night of sleep. This can lead to slightly sore hips and/or shoulders in the morning. It seems to be due to how much you sink into the fabric -or- how much/high it wraps around you while you're lying in it; your own weight coming into play also. Polyester is said to stretch less than nylon, and a heavier weight nylon (i.e. 1.9 oz or 1.6 oz) may well have less stretch/squeeze, than a lighter weight one (1.3 oz or 1.1 oz).

    u.w.

  4. #24
    Registered User scope's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-08-2006
    Location
    Chamblee, GA
    Age
    55
    Posts
    1,499
    Images
    34

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by connolm View Post
    ...I started initially with the Explorer Classic in my cart on the Hennessy website because of the sale. That price was so enticing. But then I though about it and started questioning the practicality of the so-called classic entrance. How does it work with an underquilt? How do you reach down and attached the quilt after you enter? And how do you get into your sleeping bag with your pad positioned below you? Seems like a lot of wiggling. So decided not to punch in my credit card numbers...
    If you've got a lot of room between your tarp and hammock, then the open top is much more practical. And its one of the reasons why I'd say to get a zipper mod if you do get the bottom entry version. The other reason for the zipper mod is its good to be able to reach out, whether its to adjust an underquilt or reach some of your stuff underneath the hammock. Of course, this adds to the cost, which it might seem odd to put a zipper on a hammock when you could just buy a zipper model instead. The practicality of the bottom entry originates with the way the stock tarp works and is attached to the hammock suspension. Note that the same method of attaching the tarp exists on the zip version, which IMO makes for an impractical way of entering and exiting the hammock (perhaps not with a hex tarp in porch mode). Whereas, the bottom entry entrance is from the broadly open end of the hammock, yet still covered. Entry and exit is very easy - more sit and lean back as opposed to sit and spin of a top loader. The one thing that might make a difference for you, given that you will only be camping in warm humid weather, is that there is NOTHING better for a buggy environment than the bottom entry. Put a light on your ridgeline and watch the bugs congregate on top of the net while you enter from the bottom. And if you're asking why I don't still use mine, its because I found I didn't camp in buggy conditions and went to a netless hammock.

    By the way, you attach an UQ before getting into the hammock, but you often do need to be able to reach out and adjust it, especially as you're getting used to using one. Sounds like that's a while off, though. And bags are really great for cold weather when you have to wiggle, squirm and writhe around to get yourself and pad situated. Yes, a little facetious there, but true. Not true for warmer weather. You learn to unzip the bag to use as a quilt, and then you learn how much extra material you have around you, which makes you want to change out the bag for a quilt.

    None of this means you should get the Explorer classic, but tt does sound like a really viable option for you. That said, if using a pad, a double layer hammock can be a great way of not having to constantly adjust the pad during the night as you move around (which you will do less of than you do at home). That would make either the Warbonnet or Dutch options ones to look at. Might take a peak at DreamHammock.com to see what some possibilities are, too. Best of luck in your journey!
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
    - Kate Chopin

  5. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-01-2017
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Age
    47
    Posts
    156

    Default

    Fabric is very important to hammock comfort but it is a bit size dependent. You want a little give so that it doesn't create pinch points but not so much that you sink into it. For what it's worth I think that the Xenon 1.6 is just about perfect for me but I'm on the bigger side for a hike (280.) Xenon 1.1 is probably a better choice for someone under 150 lbs. Also, I wouldn't bother with the 2 layer unless you plan on using a pad instead of an underquilt. Some folks like it as extra bug protection but I have found that giving the hammock a soak in permethrin works great and is much lighter and less fiddly. There's a lot going on with a hammock and it can be a bit overwhelming to a new user so starting off simply is a good idea.

    Even if you're only out in warmer months I would still strongly recommend an underquilt - they are just very comfortable. Something in the 40-50 degree range is my preference for summer months. You lose a lot of heat through a hammock and will get colder a lot easier than you think. For great deals on underquilts I really like the HammockGear Econ line. Good values there.

  6. #26
    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-18-2012
    Location
    Dark Side of the Moon
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,445
    Journal Entries
    6

    Default

    For the kind of money you are looking to spend, you can pick up a new Warbonnet Blackbird XLC for $180-$230 bucks. All of them have a choice of continuous loops, whoppie slings or straps. Except for a couple, all weigh the same or less than your two choices. Check over on Hammockforums.net for an upcoming hang in your area. You will see a wide variety of hammocks and setups. The people there will be very friendly and answer your questions. Almost all of them will let you try out their hammocks if you don't act like a dweeb.
    Blackheart

  7. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-07-2018
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Age
    58
    Posts
    3
    Images
    1

    Default

    I used a Hennesy Ultralight (with a 3/4 length ThermaRest pad during cooler weather) during my 2004 thru-hike. I also had the snake skins, but I found I didn't use them much. The color of the Hennesy was perfect for stealth camping. Back in the day, only the bottom entry model was available. It worked flawlessly. I spent many rainy nights in it and never felt like the fly did not provide adequate coverage.

    That said, I recently bought an REI Flash for my 2019 hike. My experience with it is limited to only one night so far, but I'm pretty impressed so far. I really like the whoopie slings and hanging hooks which speed up the hanging process (unfortunately, the fly hangs separately, so it's kind of a wash). The bug netting unzips completely and stores near your feet (now the Hennesy feels claustrophobic by comparison). I love placement of the storage pockets in the Flash (there is the perfect place to store a tablet or e-reader above your head). I've read the stated weights from Hennesy are inaccurate. If you upgrade the straps and add snake skins, you may find the weights are closer. I bought mine that last time REI had a 25% off REI-brand sale ($150). My only concern is the orange color (not too stealthy).

    I'm 5' 11", 190 lbs. and a side sleeper as well. My first night in the Flash was with an Eno insulated pad and a Enlightened Equipment quilt. With a bit of adjustment, I could get a pretty flat lay. I'm waiting for the next sale to get one for my girlfriend.

    Either would be a good choice in my opinion. Hope this helps.

  8. #28

    Default

    After this afternoons hammock nap, I weighed my Dream Hammock Raven (with mosquito net and 12' long, 1" nylon straps), and 8x10 silnylon tarp with needed lines and pegs. Total is 3 lbs 4 oz. A smaller /lighter person could save a few ounces on that. Competative, I'd say.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  9. #29

    Default

    Hammock Forums is where its at.Note,Dutch's Side Zip 11 foot 1.6 Argon hammock would likely fit the bill for you reasonably.I started with a HH Expedition in about 2003 as I recall-shelved it.You can get down quilts from Hammock Gear made from Duck down which are more than adequate and quite economical.HG also has a fine tarp for the money,The Quest.Dream Hammock,Warbonnet,and Simply Light Designs are also awesome cottage vendors.Look before you leap..........

  10. #30

    Default

    Warbonnet Traveler (netless)
    Simply Light Designs Trail Lair (integrated net)
    Dream Hammocks Dangerbird (integrated net)
    Dutchgear as stated in previous posts

    Don't buy HH, Bayer, REI, or an underpad.

  11. #31

    Default

    While you are at it-check out a guy known as Shug on You Tube.AKA- Sean Emery-humble and knowledgeable disseminator of hammock information and fun to watch!

  12. #32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gravitino View Post
    Warbonnet Traveler (netless)
    Simply Light Designs Trail Lair (integrated net)
    Dream Hammocks Dangerbird (integrated net)
    Dutchgear as stated in previous posts

    Don't buy HH, Bayer, REI, or an underpad.
    I had a Byer fail on me two days hike from the nearest trailhead, so + 1 on the above.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  13. #33

    Default

    I ultimately went with the REI flash. I had my credit card out and was ready with the Dutchware Gear - but REI's return policy won out.

    I decided it's the easiest one to try and if I don't like it, the easiest one to return. If I don't like it, Dutchware Gear is next. HH is lower on the list despite being available at REI. It has too many reviews stating the weights are off and the tarps are too small.

    The REI Flash arrived Saturday but I haven't had a chance to hang it yet. I live in an urban area with no trees. And now we're getting the remnants of Florence.

    It did weight exactly 2 lbs 14 oz right out of the box as claimed. It's a bit bulkier than I expected but I was able to roll it more compact than originally shipped. It does have a nice "wow factor" with all the nifty design and integration. Lots of pockets, zippers and tabs. The cordage is fancy with color weave and reflector tech. The four stakes are typical. The whoopie slings look nice and the C-link caribiners are light and like nothing I've seen before.

    Sent from my VS990 using Tapatalk

  14. #34

    Default

    If you don't get comfortable in the hammock, it could be that the REI Flash is too short and too narrow. The Flash is nine feet long, while the typical cottage hammocks is eleven feet. The Flash is 36 inches wide versus the typical 56-58 inches of a cottage hammock. The lack of length and width may preclude achieving a diagonal flat lay, which creates the most significant comfort factor in a hammock. The alternative is the "banana" position, laying straight in the hammock, which is not as comfortable or healthy, as it creates more curvature on the spine, hyper-extension of the knees, and strain on the neck.

  15. #35

    Default

    I purchased an asym tarp from Dutch once.Decided I didn't like it-he took it back no questions asked and I then purchased a Hex tarp from him.As for weight- I am pretty sure my Dutch 11 Foot Side Zip in hexon 1.0 weighs about 14 oz total.Go compare that to the HH and you will see why I shelved it,although the HH is a real workhorse.
    I did use a larger tarp with my HH for a long time and shelved the original asym tarp that came with it.

  16. #36

    Default

    I should be able to get out this weekend and string things up for assessment. For size comparison, I also purchased an 11 foot hammock from Amazon for $17.99. It's measures 130" x 78" and looks like an ENO knock-off. You can see it here.

    Its claimed weight is 2.1 lbs - so not exactly backpack worthy. $17.99 is a reasonably safe investment to get to the bottom of this size/comfort issue. I've spent more than that on 4-packs of craft beer.

  17. #37
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-01-2017
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Age
    47
    Posts
    156

    Default

    Congrats on the purchase! Hanging can take a while to get used to so be patient with it and understand that it may take a couple of tries to get used to. The 1st big question you're going to have to find the answer to is how do I prefer to lay in a hammock? Some things that you should experiment with to see what is more comfortable for you personally:

    - If you're using an air pas as insulation you're going to have to play around with how full to fill it so that it's comfortable but still provides insulation
    - Try switching sides - some folks prefer head left, feet right, and some prefer the reverse
    - Play around with the height of the hammock ends. Most folks like the foot side a little higher than the head side. I prefer the reverse. You're just going to have to experiment with this to see what you like.
    - It doesn't look like either hammock you chose has a structural ridgeline. That line connects the two ends of the hammock so that the amount of sag in the hammock is always the same regardless of the angle of the straps connecting it to the trees. You can hang just fine without one but that's another variable. You'll have to play around with tightening an loosening the ends to adjust the sag of the the hammock. It impacts comfort a lot.

    Good luck! Let us know how it goes this weekend!

  18. #38
    Registered User ggreaves's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-13-2013
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Age
    52
    Posts
    190

    Default

    flash.jpg

    This overhead shot of the flash hammock from the REI website demonstrates a complete lack of understanding in how you're supposed to lie in a gathered end hammock. Enjoy your purchase but don't try to use it like you see in the picture. You'll be quite uncomfortable. rei actually sells a bridge hammock for a similar price as this one btw.

  19. #39
    Registered User ggreaves's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-13-2013
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Age
    52
    Posts
    190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gravitino View Post
    If you don't get comfortable in the hammock, it could be that the REI Flash is too short and too narrow. The Flash is nine feet long, while the typical cottage hammocks is eleven feet. The Flash is 36 inches wide versus the typical 56-58 inches of a cottage hammock. The lack of length and width may preclude achieving a diagonal flat lay, which creates the most significant comfort factor in a hammock. The alternative is the "banana" position, laying straight in the hammock, which is not as comfortable or healthy, as it creates more curvature on the spine, hyper-extension of the knees, and strain on the neck.
    what he?/she? said. 9' hammocks don't work very well for tall people. I'm 5'9" and my hennessy feels quite cramped to me. I don't use it anymore.

  20. #40
    Registered User Just Bill's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-06-2013
    Location
    Chicago, Il
    Age
    41
    Posts
    3,772

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ggreaves View Post
    flash.jpg

    This overhead shot of the flash hammock from the REI website demonstrates a complete lack of understanding in how you're supposed to lie in a gathered end hammock. Enjoy your purchase but don't try to use it like you see in the picture. You'll be quite uncomfortable. rei actually sells a bridge hammock for a similar price as this one btw.
    Don't take this as personal- your post is a convenient example.

    I do like a wide long hammock in a gathered end design.
    But just about any college kid can get a good nap in a 4x9 pocket hammock. And I have several folks who have reached out to me to build them, including some older folks. I don't mind them for a quick trip.
    I also couldn't give a crap about hammocks when I was 18 and willing to sleep on a 1/4" cut down piece of foam either.


    A rectangular bodied gathered end hammock (whipped or channel) does indeed have limitations regarding lay direction. It does indeed benefit from a diagonal lay. Additional length or width can indeed increase the flat feel and increase in comfort. Selecting just the right fabric for your individual body weight may in fact help quite a bit.

    For the most part any cheap knock off product you pick up on amazon will be of inferior quality to a well designed brand name. And any brand name gear will not have the innovation, care, or intense customer service one might find in a cottage brand. Though I have seen some pretty heinous gear sewn from 'cottage vendors'... so smaller isn't always better either. Sometimes it's still nice to get something in hand from a place you can park in the lot and find someone face to face.

    Point being- yes many hammock folks do have a complete understanding of a very specific type of hammock. I generally agree with that understanding.

    What is mildly funny is that I am starting to hear more often from folks who are intimidated by hammock forums. (Ironically WB was always the 'harsh' place and HF the 'nice' one).
    Cut people a little slack. Let them get started or try something before you run them off.
    There are actually lots of different ways to string a piece of fabric from a tree. By far the simplest is a gathered end. It is not the only way.

    Maybe that REI thing sucks. Their 'couch' sucked. The bridge wasn't great, but it sucked less. This thing might not end up sucking. Who cares? Let him try it and return it. Or it works and he's happy.
    It'd be one thing if someone chimed in and said they used the hammock and it sucked.
    It is clearly designed to be used with an inline lay. It's doubtful you could lie on an angle. If you did, odds are good it would suck even more.

    There are ways to design an inline lay hammock. No idea if REI has figured them out- but I know for a fact that it can be done.
    Just as both the Amok Dramor and 90* UL from hammock tent show that you can design one that also lays "wrong".
    A bridge is an inline lay hammock. So two of the most popular hammock designs are also 'wrong'.

    There are also ways to shape the ends and do different things that most in the hammock community demonstrate a complete lack of comprehension regarding any of these possibilities. A roll width by 11' rectangle featuring fabric from dutch or ripstop by the roll is not the ONLY hammock that exists. If it worked so amazing for everyone all the time then why does the Ridgerunner sell so well?

    If Speer's legendary whipped end design was all we needed then why didn't it stop there? When Tom brought his hammocks to the masses and changed the game... how did all these cottage guys get a foot in the door?
    People always push to make better stuff. Is a 'knotty mod' a technological leap of genius on par with Tesla... or is it just a good idea from somebody tinkering on the forums who let his cottage buddies use it? Is it possible some tinkerer working for a non cottage vendor might not get a good idea some day?

    I love that hammock folks are such dedicated fans and supporters of both the hobby AND the cottage vendors.
    But the goal is to get folks out in the woods comfortably... not run them off for having an independent thought.
    It takes an open mind to try a hammock.
    It is odd that folks tend to slam that open mind shut once they find something that works for them and try so hard to force it on everyone else.

    I build gear with an open mind because if what I wanted was on the shelf it's easier just to buy it.
    I build the lightest bridge hammock in the world. I build the largest too.
    I build 90* hammocks, 60* hammocks and even a 180* hammock.
    I have at least 10 unique designs that are not released to the public.
    I even build an inline lay gathered end hammock less than is in fact under 9' long, the one below is in fact only one of them.

    I'm just one dude, who does this part time. Imagine what a team of smart designers might stumble on one day if they get lucky and choose not to simply duplicate what others have done?
    There are alot of gimmicks and wanna-be vendors... but there is still some innovation.
    Not only from a new vendor... but perhaps from that next hanger who comes along who chooses not to just buy from Randy, Dutch or Brandon and see what might just be possible if they give it a shot.
    In fact that's exactly who people like Dutch and Brandon are in the first place. These beloved cottage vendors wouldn't exist unless they chose not to use the once beloved Speer or Hennessy folks probably told them to buy.
    9' inline hammock.jpg

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •