Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1

    Default Looking for tips from Zpack owners

    My Zpacks Plexamid came in yesterday. Have watched the setup video which looks super easy compared to my previous tent.

    Any tips for maintaining this tent?
    My previous tent was a Marmot Tungsten 2P UL...so double wall, footprint etc.

    As Iíll be hiking the AT next year, should I consider tyvek or other ground sheet? I think Iíve read that the floor of a Zpacks tent is pretty durable that a ground sheet isnít needed.

    Tia
    We donít stop hiking because we grow old, we grow old because we stop hiking.
    - Finis Mitchell


    https://lighterpack.com/r/7kdpc0

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-17-2009
    Location
    Hadley Pa.
    Age
    63
    Posts
    394

    Default

    You'll not need, have to have, a ground sheet. But... Its you that has to carry it if you'll feel better protecting the bottom. A few un needed ounces here and a few there adds up. No real set up tips. You'll get it down to a routine after a few dozen set ups in varying terrain. Look for roots, rocks and saplings to tie it down and not use stakes when you can.

  3. #3
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    63
    Posts
    4,127
    Images
    3

    Default

    I believe the plexamid is an evolved version of the older Solo+ tent, which I used for the 2nd half of my AT hike 5 years ago.... My #1 learning point is that the front stake is critical; make sure that puppy is solid! After a couple of fails, I now use a larger stake for that anchor point, and back it up with a rock when available. IF any of the other stakes blow, at least the tent won't fall over like if the front one blows out.

    It is also important to get the front corner stakes spacing right; if too close, the pole needs to be extended to get the tent tight, but than it's hard to zip. Getting this overall geometry correct takes a few setups to nail down perfectly.

    My wife and I now use a Duplex when we're hiking together, which has that same bath tub floor as the plexamid, and do not use a tyvek groundsheet, I really don't feel it's necessary, but this is a weirdly hotly contested subject. If you must use a groundsheet, at least use a light one, like one made out of polycryo (about 1.5 ounces).

    Enjoy your fantastic new tent! And enjoy the UL nature of it on your back.

  4. #4

    Default

    I just plop mine down on the ground. That being said, the condensation(Single wall tent problems) typically isn't terrible but it is definitely there, but I don't know how much a footprint only would help with that.
    Trail Miles: 3,715.9
    AT Trips: 67
    AT Map 1 Completion: 1818.9 Springer, GA - Franconia Notch, NH
    AT Map 2 Completion: 263.8 Gaps From GA - PA

  5. #5

    Default

    I recommend carrying the cuben repair tape they sell. Sticks nicely and blends seamlessly.

    I have the duplex which uses eight stakes. For the critical points, I use two V-stakes, one at each door.
    Springer to Katahdin: 1991-2018

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-31-2013
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Age
    58
    Posts
    586
    Images
    2

    Default

    I've got about 1000 miles on my Duplex and I've never used a ground sheet. I don't believe that one is needed especially if you spend a minute or two to remove sticks/rocks before setup. As mentioned, repair tape is a good idea and it's trivial to patch a cuben fiber tent if you ever do develop a hole.

    I've also just purchased the Plexamid and have spent one night in it so far and I am about to leave on a 9 day trip with it. My initial thoughts are that I love the weight and smaller footprint than the Duplex. But I absolutely hate, and I mean hate, the carbon fiber rods used to create the squared off peak. It severely limits packability by constraining the minimum width that the tent can be packed and creates high tension spots that rub the inside my HMG 3400 pack when the tent is placed horizontally inside my pack (which I always do with the Duplex). So, I've remove the rods (which is easy) and I much prefer it. You lose a little headroom (not an issue for me) and the peak is not taught with a few wrinkles around the peak but it seems to be purely an aesthetic issue IMO. The tent now packs into nothing and I can fold it up with whatever width I desire to best fit in my pack.
    Remote for detachment, narrow for chosen company, winding for leisure, lonely for contemplation, the Trail beckons not merely north and south, but upward to the body, mind, and soul of man.


  7. #7

    Default

    The Plexamid is the evolved version of the Altaplex, which I personally felt was their best 1 person shelter. Stake the 4 corners out first leaving it slightly loose to account for raising the entrance, then insert the trekking pole and stake down. Adjust the 4 corners as needed and then stake out the remaining lines.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    I believe the plexamid is an evolved version of the older Solo+ tent, which I used for the 2nd half of my AT hike 5 years ago.... My #1 learning point is that the front stake is critical; make sure that puppy is solid! After a couple of fails, I now use a larger stake for that anchor point, and back it up with a rock when available. IF any of the other stakes blow, at least the tent won't fall over like if the front one blows out.

    It is also important to get the front corner stakes spacing right; if too close, the pole needs to be extended to get the tent tight, but than it's hard to zip. Getting this overall geometry correct takes a few setups to nail down perfectly.

    My wife and I now use a Duplex when we're hiking together, which has that same bath tub floor as the plexamid, and do not use a tyvek groundsheet, I really don't feel it's necessary, but this is a weirdly hotly contested subject. If you must use a groundsheet, at least use a light one, like one made out of polycryo (about 1.5 ounces).

    Enjoy your fantastic new tent! And enjoy the UL nature of it on your back.
    Awesome! Ty.
    Two years ago, I thought my 1700g tent setup was light...but the Plexamid is only 420g...plus 10 Ti stakes.
    We donít stop hiking because we grow old, we grow old because we stop hiking.
    - Finis Mitchell


    https://lighterpack.com/r/7kdpc0

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SteelCut View Post
    I've got about 1000 miles on my Duplex and I've never used a ground sheet. I don't believe that one is needed especially if you spend a minute or two to remove sticks/rocks before setup. As mentioned, repair tape is a good idea and it's trivial to patch a cuben fiber tent if you ever do develop a hole.

    I've also just purchased the Plexamid and have spent one night in it so far and I am about to leave on a 9 day trip with it. My initial thoughts are that I love the weight and smaller footprint than the Duplex. But I absolutely hate, and I mean hate, the carbon fiber rods used to create the squared off peak. It severely limits packability by constraining the minimum width that the tent can be packed and creates high tension spots that rub the inside my HMG 3400 pack when the tent is placed horizontally inside my pack (which I always do with the Duplex). So, I've remove the rods (which is easy) and I much prefer it. You lose a little headroom (not an issue for me) and the peak is not taught with a few wrinkles around the peak but it seems to be purely an aesthetic issue IMO. The tent now packs into nothing and I can fold it up with whatever width I desire to best fit in my pack.
    Interesting...regarding the rods. I’ll be setting up today, and if a PITA like you’ve said, may do the same removing.
    We donít stop hiking because we grow old, we grow old because we stop hiking.
    - Finis Mitchell


    https://lighterpack.com/r/7kdpc0

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-31-2013
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Age
    58
    Posts
    586
    Images
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BowGal View Post
    Interesting...regarding the rods. I’ll be setting up today, and if a PITA like you’ve said, may do the same removing.
    They are a bit tricky to re-insert. I took a photo of how they are originally configured before removal.
    Remote for detachment, narrow for chosen company, winding for leisure, lonely for contemplation, the Trail beckons not merely north and south, but upward to the body, mind, and soul of man.


  11. #11
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-20-2013
    Location
    Upper East Side of Texas
    Age
    73
    Posts
    8,284

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SteelCut View Post
    I've got about 1000 miles on my Duplex and I've never used a ground sheet. I don't believe that one is needed especially if you spend a minute or two to remove sticks/rocks before setup. As mentioned, repair tape is a good idea and it's trivial to patch a cuben fiber tent if you ever do develop a hole.

    I've also just purchased the Plexamid and have spent one night in it so far and I am about to leave on a 9 day trip with it. My initial thoughts are that I love the weight and smaller footprint than the Duplex. But I absolutely hate, and I mean hate, the carbon fiber rods used to create the squared off peak. It severely limits packability by constraining the minimum width that the tent can be packed and creates high tension spots that rub the inside my HMG 3400 pack when the tent is placed horizontally inside my pack (which I always do with the Duplex). So, I've remove the rods (which is easy) and I much prefer it. You lose a little headroom (not an issue for me) and the peak is not taught with a few wrinkles around the peak but it seems to be purely an aesthetic issue IMO. The tent now packs into nothing and I can fold it up with whatever width I desire to best fit in my pack.
    Thank you for pointing out the narrow width of the HMG 3400 packs. I was actually pondering purchasing a Southwest 3400. Reading the dimensions I found the 10.5" back width. That number rules out the HMG packs for me. My TarpTent StratoSpire 1 rolls up to 16" long. It fits horizontally in BOTH of my current packs. While the HMG 3400 would cut 1.5 pounds from my current lightest pack, the narrower width is a non-starter!
    Thanks again for accidentally drawing my attention to the dimensions of the HMG 3400.
    Wayne
    Eddie Valiant: "That lame-brain freeway idea could only be cooked up by a toon."
    https://wayne-ayearwithbigfootandbubba.blogspot.com
    FlickrMyBookTwitSpaceFace



  12. #12

    Default

    Pretty much a repeat of what is mentioned above: no groundsheet necessary, larger/heavier duty stakes for the main pullout, and carry cuben repair tape. I have Duplex, and with hundreds of miles on it, no damage to floor at all without using a groundsheet once. I always take a minute or two to clear the sticks and rocks from where I will be setting it up. I use Ti hook stakes for the 6 end stakes, and 2 heavier duty V or Y shaped stakes for the center pullouts. I never really had an issue with the Ti stakes for the center, but just want that extra holding power. I started with their carbon fiber stakes and quickly realized that was a mistake. Hard to get out of the ground and I hear them crack sometimes when putting them in tough soil. They got replaced pretty quickly.

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-28-2010
    Location
    Montgomery, AL
    Posts
    130

    Default

    Just pack the rods separately from the tent.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  14. #14

    Default

    Here is the review I did on the Zpacks Duplex tent and the customer service. Cheers.

    https://www.artemisonthetrail.com/zpacks/

  15. #15

    Default

    Love my Zpaks solo plus tent; things I have learned:

    1. I use 3 MSR ground hawg stakes-1 in front of door and other 2 on the ends of the ridge line for a super solid pitch.
    2. I keep a small towel to wipe condensation from inside if it is really humid out
    3. Don't unknowingly spill your tea in the tent as it will remain a puddle until your sleeping bag soaks it up, lol!
    4. Enjoy the feathery weight of your killer shelter

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •