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  1. #1
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    Default PINOLE ANCIENT SUPERFOOD SQUARES Sacha Inchi

    Sacha Inchi

    Sacha inchi, also known as an Inca nut, are actually seeds that come from South America. The seeds are one of the richest sources of omega fatty acids in the world, containing omega 3, 6, and 9. They’re also rich in protein, delivering all 9 essential amino acids, as well as alpha tocopherol, vitamin E, carotenoids (vitamin A), and fiber.Just one ounce of sacha inchi contains around 8 grams of protein–beating out everyone’s favorite–almond butter!So, keep your batteries charged with these delectable treats that are fast, easy, and packed with nutrition!Total Time: 30-35 minPrep: 15 minCook: 15-20 minYield: about 20-30 2-inch squaresIngredients:1 cup cooked Banana + Blueberry Pinole2 tablespoons coconut˝ teaspoon salt1 tablespoon coconut oil˝ teaspoon allspice1/3 cup sacha inchi1/3 cup dates2 tablespoons almond butter1 teaspoon vanilla extract2 tablespoons agave nectar1 tablespoon oatsDirections:Preheat oven to 350 degrees and prepare a cooking tray, lined with parchment paper for easy clean up.Cook pinole according to directions on bag: add 1 to 1-˝ cups of your milk of choice to ˝ cup dry pinole mix and cook on stovetop for 3-5 minutes, stirring frequently, until it thickens to a hot cereal consistency. Set aside when complete.Grab a small mixing bowl that can go in the microwave. Chop dates into quarters and add almond butter, coconut oil, vanilla extract, and agave nectar. Stick in the microwave for about 30 seconds to 1 minute and blend ingredients thoroughly to form a paste-like texture.Combine cooked pinole and dry ingredients (coconut, oats, sacha inchi, allspice, salt) and mix together.Place mixture on parchment-lined cooking tray (about 1/2 inch thick) and stick in the oven for 15-20 minutes.Let cool, cut into squares, and enjoy!

    https://nativestatefoods.com/all-pos...foods-squares/

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    Pinole is corn based... but interesting regardless. I realize you didn't name the recipe... just can't help myself, lol.

    Many of the Central and South American Native tribes did use chia or other seeds but most North American tribes use pounded roasted corn as the key ingredient.

    https://nuts.com/nuts/peanuts/sacha-inchi.html

    Looks like an interesting combo to mix with corn nuts or simply to add to trail mix.

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    They go into the origins of pinole on one of the other pages at that site. This is just supposed to be an idea based on the theme. Sounds delicious.

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    Registered User Just Bill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    They go into the origins of pinole on one of the other pages at that site. This is just supposed to be an idea based on the theme. Sounds delicious.
    You runners

    Long before born to run came out (the runner one not the Springsteen one) it was Jerky, Pemmican, and Pinole for North American superfoods used by the scouts/runners, and formed the basis of most provisions for early long distance travelers. Though speaking of white folks meeting the natives... It was Camping and Woodcraft by Horace Kephart which first popularized the three foods for modern wilderness travel.

    The Hill folk of Appalachia he dwelled with know it better as rockihominy.

    Up here; roobiboo (similar roux in cooking) was the method used to convert the pinole to a porridge or bread when time allowed. Ideally you fry up a little pemmican for the fat, brown together to make roux, then add water to make a soup that you could supplement with any greens you find.

    When the gringos went to meet the tarahumara we got another version... which is arguably better tasting with the cacao, cinnamon and chilis.

    As a field ration though it's meant to be eaten dry with some water regardless of where it comes from.

    I do think it interesting that the name is the same throughout all the americas with all its diverse tribes and languages.

    Masa harina is the closest commercially available corn product available today that matches it. You'd need Malto or Odd Man Out to cover the food science/chemistry but roasting the corn in ash and then pounding on limestone adds things that make it more than just plain corn meal.
    You are correct though- the other tab more accurately matches Pinole, albeit with a central american flair.
    Guess when all of the people who populate this place have a common ancestor then they all have the same ancient food staple.

    I don't really have any PC 'cultural appropriation' bone to pick... I just find it funny how a running book and weird fascination with 'superfoods' turned into ancient aztec wisdom marketing speak and $15 bags of corn meal.
    Technically premium pinole was made up in Alaska long before folks got around to walking down to Mexico, and sold in general stores all over the U.S. for most of our early history.

    "Purely Pinole is the first premium pinole product ever to be made available in the US! Chock full of vitamins and minerals, protein, fiber, and powerful antioxidants – pinole has been fueling warriors, adventurists, endurance runners, and explorers for centuries."

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    Purple Corn used in Pinole

    quote:

    Traditional Use and Health BenefitsHailing from the Peruvian Andes mountains, purple corn has been used for 1000’s of years by the indigenous peoples of this region for a multitude of purposes. It is used as a base for drinks, sorbets, puddings and popsicles or used to make bread and tortillas. One of the most popular uses for purple corn is in “chicha morada” – made by boiling the kernels with fruits and spices – a drink thought to date back to before the creation of the Incan empire. This sweet beverage is now recognized as a nutrient powerhouse due to its rich antioxidant content, vitamins and minerals.

    Purple Corn BenefitsAntioxidant PowerhousePurple Corn expresses one of the deepest purple shades found in the plant kingdom, this vibrant purple hue being indicative of the kind of antioxidants it contains – anthocyanins. These powerful compounds make Purple Corn stand head and shoulders above regular corn in terms of contribution to health. A 2004 study published in “The Journal of Nutrition” found that one particular anthocyanin found in Purple Corn – CG3 – has the potential to fight obesity and diabetes. CG3 is reported to be one of the most powerful antioxidants in existence, coming out top when tested against 13 other anthocyanins in the ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) assay, which tests for antioxidant activity.Another antioxidant making waves in nutritional circles is a hydroxybenzoic acid in purple corn - protocatechuic acid – which has been recently linked to the strong antioxidant activity in this corn variety.

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    https://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/sho...=1#post1948726

    A silly ol bone of mine fer picking fer no good reason... Didn't mean to start an argument.

    But from that thread is my Pinole recipe:

    Pinole-
    Different subject entirely, but this can be your travelling grain based staple.
    While popular again from "born to run" Horace Kephart and many others have described this commonly carried ration. In the south it was called Rockihomminy IIRC. It's not simply corn meal, but a process involving some fire ashes in the roasting process and crushing in a limestone vessel. The ash and lime add properties to the corn.

    I use Masa Harina from Bob's Red Mill as the base ingredient. It is available at Mexican grocery stores generally. http://www.bobsredmill.com/golden-ma...orn-flour.html
    I often add a little blue corn meal- roughly 4-1 masa to blue corn. http://www.bobsredmill.com/blue-cornmeal.html

    General recipe-
    4 cups masa harina
    1 cup blue corn meal
    1 cup chia seeds
    1 cup hershey 100% cacao special dark
    1 cup coconut sugar
    1/2 cup cinnamon
    1/2 cup smoked paprika
    1/4 cup turmeric


    Add all to a large pan (I use a big wok) and heat over low while whisking together. When it is all blended and warm to the touch it is done. Let it dry and store in Ziploc bags. On trail- 1/4 cup is a meal- roughly 100 cal.

    It can be eaten "dry" which is the traditional method. Put a spoon full in your mouth, take a swallow of water to wash it down and repeat. Don't eat more than a few spoonful's at a crack when on the move.

    A quarter cup of pemmican and a few spoons of pinole is a pretty filling meal. It's best to eat these foods as the natives did- nibble pemmican while moving and eat pinole when you reach a water source. Or basically- dribble in a spoonful of each every hour.

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    Thx Zelph.

    Ever try sacha inchi 100% powder or plain roasted nuts by themselves? I wouldn't again. They need to be combined with other flavors.. as your recipe. Nutty and buttery aren't the words I'd use to describe the finish.

    Might substitute more chopped dates for the agave syrup and Saigon cinnamon and ginger for the allspice.

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    A thousand years from now, somebody will post a recipe about a food that powered thousands of hikers over miles of trails. I don't know what they will call it in the year 3018, but we call it PopTarts now!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Thx Zelph.

    Ever try sacha inchi 100% powder or plain roasted nuts by themselves? I wouldn't again. They need to be combined with other flavors.. as your recipe. Nutty and buttery aren't the words I'd use to describe the finish.

    Might substitute more chopped dates for the agave syrup and Saigon cinnamon and ginger for the allspice.
    I'm in the learning stage right now. Just today, in another thread I saw the word pinole used and it caught my interest. Your insight about using dates is valuable, thank you!

    I've recently been experimenting with roasted Chinese chestnuts. I gathered about 10 pounds while on a camping trip a few weeks ago in central Illinois. I came across 2 very mature trees in a groomed lawn setting on state property and so with permission, I picked and picked with no competition. I was instructed to pick them fast before the local orientals get them :-) As I was leaving the picnic area, I found another mature tree....next year maybe 20 pounds :-)

    PINOLE ANCIENT SUPERFOOD SQUARES

    APinole squares.JPG
    Last edited by zelph; 11-08-2018 at 16:50.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deadeye View Post
    A thousand years from now, somebody will post a recipe about a food that powered thousands of hikers over miles of trails. I don't know what they will call it in the year 3018, but we call it PopTarts now!
    With a side of Snickers bars.
    Thanks for the chuckle!
    Wayne

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    Good score Zelph. Naturalized and native persimmons may have also been available on the IL hike another oft forgotten delectable. Hey Zelph since you're into expanding your learning ever find ripe pawpaws? What a treat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Good score Zelph. Naturalized and native persimmons may have also been available on the IL hike another oft forgotten delectable. Hey Zelph since you're into expanding your learning ever find ripe pawpaws? What a treat.
    I have never come across either one of those....I've always wanted to find some. I've eaten plenty of ripe May Apples...lots of those in the woodlands around here. Found some plants this year about 3 feet tall, never went back to watch for the fruit :-(

    Payday nut bar. One of my favorites...also the OhHenry was a good one.





    Last edited by zelph; 11-09-2018 at 11:58.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
    https://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/sho...=1#post1948726

    While popular again from "born to run" Horace Kephart and many others have described this commonly carried ration. In the south it was called Rockihomminy IIRC. It's not simply corn meal, but a process involving some fire ashes in the roasting process and crushing in a limestone vessel. The ash and lime add properties to the corn.
    That process is also called Nixtamal farther south, like down in Mexico. The ash and water makes lime, calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide. Pickling lime works just as well. Soak corn in it overnight, then rinse the heck out of it with warm water, while rubbing the outer shell of the corn off the kernels. At that point, it's hominy. Grind it, and it becomes masa.

    B vitamins are chemically locked up in corn. The reactions with the strong basic alkali unlock the vitamins, creating one of the first "super foods". People who didn't do this got pellagra. Those who did stayed healthy. (Assume corn as a food base.)

    Here's a recipe and procedure by Alton Brown. The video is great, too, as his often are. https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/...recipe-2040369

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