Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4
Results 61 to 67 of 67

Thread: Where to live

  1. #61
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-23-2019
    Location
    Harpers ferry wv.
    Age
    56
    Posts
    511

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shutterbug View Post
    I have lived pretty well all over the U.S. and I suggest that Denver, CO is as good as it gets for hiking. Even during the winter, there is hiking in the foothills. When it warms up a bit, there is unlimited hiking in the Rocky Mountains.
    I concur 100% , that's my plan. ( or somewhere around there ) .

  2. #62
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-30-2006
    Location
    Bozeman, MT
    Age
    58
    Posts
    538
    Images
    6

    Default

    The West is not for everyone... reading between the lines, I'm thinking you belong in Virginia.

  3. #63

    Default

    The main question is not where you can live to go hiking---heck most cities have Greenways for hiking---but where you can live which is close to unrestricted backpacking opportunities. "Unrestricted" is the keyword.

    No permits, no fees, no reservations, no designated You Must Camp Here madness etc---find these areas and have at it. The TN/NC mountains are still loaded with unrestricted trails and backpacking and camping opportunities---go where you want for however long you want.

  4. #64
    Registered User JPritch's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-03-2017
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Age
    41
    Posts
    524

    Default

    I have designs on Utah. My wife wants to stay put in our little town in VA. Not much middle ground there.
    While searching for that unknown edge in life, never forget to look home. For the greatest edge you can find in life is to stand in the protective shadow of those who love you.

  5. #65
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    63
    Posts
    4,232
    Images
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shutterbug View Post
    I have lived pretty well all over the U.S. and I suggest that Denver, CO is as good as it gets for hiking. Even during the winter, there is hiking in the foothills. When it warms up a bit, there is unlimited hiking in the Rocky Mountains.
    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    I concur 100% , that's my plan. ( or somewhere around there ) .
    Well, sure, Denver is great in terms of access to mountain hiking, skiing, etc, but it is a big crowded city. We live here though only because we have lots of kids and grandkids here. We (or at least, I) would prefer to live in a smaller "mountain" town, such as Salida or Buena Vista (pronounced by residents bee-une-a-vista!?). Salida is particularly attractive to an old fart like myself because it has a full size, full-service hospital right near town. I search land listings near Salida on a regular basis, and have a cabin plan all ready to go when the time comes. Lots of other really cool towns, like Lake City, Ouray, etc, but we like closer access to Denver (2:15 drive from Salida)

    Not sure what Tipi means by "restrictions", but if there are any restrictions to hiking/camping/backpacking in most of CO, I sure don't know of any. Zillions of acres of wilderness (no mechanized anything) and National forests. Except of course in the national parks, which are crowded and need permits, but are cool to visit now and then, but a small percentage of CO hiking terrain. One advantage of having these 4 national parks is that they concentrate the tourists. 90% of the time when we're travelling out of state, and it comes up in conversation that we're from CO, the folks will say: "Yeah! We LOVE Estes Park", meaning they love Rocky Mountain National Park, confusing the little tourist city of Estes Park with RMNP.

    Another advantage of CO is that it is centrally located for visiting WY, UT and NM, which all have their charms, especially Utah. Can't say enough good things about southern Utah, except the extreme politics.

    A big disadvantage of CO these days, for a good part of the sate (and surrounding states), is the prevalence of beetle kill for pine trees. The good news is the huge percentage of great hiking terrain that is above treeline, but of course you can see the dead forests from there still.

  6. #66
    Registered User foodbag's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-08-2003
    Location
    unlisted
    Posts
    199
    Images
    3

    Default

    New York State has a ton of opportunities for every outdoor activity imaginable. It also has winter, which is something to consider when moving there from Florida. That being said, I moved to Florida from New York 7 years ago, and if my other half ever decides that she wants to go back, well, I'm outta here. I always took the outdoors for granted when I lived in New York, but never again. I miss it.
    Long-distance aspirations with short-distance feet.... :jump

  7. #67
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-20-2013
    Location
    Upper East Side of Texas
    Age
    73
    Posts
    8,313

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by foodbag View Post
    New York State has a ton of opportunities for every outdoor activity imaginable. It also has winter, which is something to consider when moving there from Florida. That being said, I moved to Florida from New York 7 years ago, and if my other half ever decides that she wants to go back, well, I'm outta here. I always took the outdoors for granted when I lived in New York, but never again. I miss it.
    Think Idaho. Several lifetimes of outdoor activities. The neighboring states and provinces arenít too shabby either.
    And. Itís not New York State. 👍
    Cheers!
    Wayne

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •