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  1. #1
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    Default compression socks

    Lately I've seen several runners with these high tech compression socks. I looked them up at Sports authority.
    They sound very worth while for hikers, calf support, less calf fatigue. some with ankle support. no weights reported.
    and they would function as sock liners $20 - $50
    I was planning on bringing a pair of elastic knee highs. You know those ugly beige knee socks old ladies wear.
    I think the things for runners would be better.

  2. #2
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    Some are above the knee, for knee support, some have knee pads for knee abrasion protection.

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    I started using the Zensah calf compression sleeves last year on all hikes, they are well worth the money. http://www.zensah.com/men/men-leg-sl...g-sleeves.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by Praha4 View Post
    I started using the Zensah calf compression sleeves last year on all hikes, they are well worth the money. http://www.zensah.com/men/men-leg-sl...g-sleeves.html
    Do you know the weight on these?
    Smile, Smile, Smile.... Mile after Mile

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    just weighed them, the Zensah S/M sleeves are 1.0 oz/each
    Quote Originally Posted by 88BlueGT View Post
    Do you know the weight on these?

  6. #6
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    What do you think ? socks or sleeves?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Praha4 View Post
    I started using the Zensah calf compression sleeves last year on all hikes, they are well worth the money. http://www.zensah.com/men/men-leg-sl...g-sleeves.html
    I have a set of these too that I have available mainly to help with shin splints if the need arises.

  8. #8
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
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    I'd go with the sleeves. That way you can use them regardless of how which hiking socks you're wearing.
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

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    I agree with Kerosene. Get the sleeves for the calves, that still lets you pick whatever socks you want. I've never had a problem with shin splints after I started using the Zensahs.

  10. #10

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    Unless you have a medical condition I wouldn't waste my money on these things. I've also seen runners use them, including the professionals, but not many, because if you properly build up your body you don't need these thing; futhermore, they can be counterproductive, because they can weaken the muscles (in the long run) that don't have to work as hard when they are worn. Sort of like taking testosterone, the stuff helps you in the short term but hurts you (really bad) in the long run.

    Of the professional runners that wear them, there may be a few that have a medical conditon requiring their use, but I wouldn't be surprised if many of them are just looking for that little edge to win the race, but otherwise wouldn't wear them.

    BTW, there is a muscle in you calf muscles that is commonly referred to as you second heart http://m.runnersworld.com/injury-pre...oleus-strength

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    I'm old, fat, and out of shape. Does that count as a medical condition?

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    I'll try to just ignore Pedaling Fool basically calling me out as some kind of wimp or sucker for using calf compressions sleeves. I've been a long distance runner since high school, and backpacking for many years. I think I know a little bit about training and physical therapy for hiking injuries, including shin splints. And I can say that I've done many AT hikes without the Zensahs, and many AT and LT hikes with the Zensahs, and the Zensah calf compression sleeves definitely helped me avoid shin splints. And I spend months training for these hikes. I would say these calf compression sleeves fall into a similar category of support gear as orthotic inserts for your shoes. Of course hikers should train and try to build up their bodies, but that does not rule out using these type items to help recovery and avoid injury. And I would also say it is absolutely silly to say that calf compression sleeves weaken the leg muscles because you don't have to work as hard. That's like saying hiking with a lighter pack is counterproductive because it weakens our muscles.....so I guess pedaling fool thinks we should all hike with heavier packs in order to prove how tough you are? My advice is try hiking with them and without them and decide for yourself. Regards.
    Quote Originally Posted by Pedaling Fool View Post
    Unless you have a medical condition I wouldn't waste my money on these things. I've also seen runners use them, including the professionals, but not many, because if you properly build up your body you don't need these thing; futhermore, they can be counterproductive, because they can weaken the muscles (in the long run) that don't have to work as hard when they are worn. Sort of like taking testosterone, the stuff helps you in the short term but hurts you (really bad) in the long run.

    Of the professional runners that wear them, there may be a few that have a medical conditon requiring their use, but I wouldn't be surprised if many of them are just looking for that little edge to win the race, but otherwise wouldn't wear them.

    BTW, there is a muscle in you calf muscles that is commonly referred to as you second heart http://m.runnersworld.com/injury-pre...oleus-strength

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedaling Fool View Post
    Unless you have a medical condition I wouldn't waste my money on these things. I've also seen runners use them, including the professionals, but not many, because if you properly build up your body you don't need these thing; futhermore, they can be counterproductive, because they can weaken the muscles (in the long run) that don't have to work as hard when they are worn. Sort of like taking testosterone, the stuff helps you in the short term but hurts you (really bad) in the long run.

    Of the professional runners that wear them, there may be a few that have a medical conditon requiring their use, but I wouldn't be surprised if many of them are just looking for that little edge to win the race, but otherwise wouldn't wear them.

    BTW, there is a muscle in you calf muscles that is commonly referred to as you second heart http://m.runnersworld.com/injury-pre...oleus-strength
    odd - I too was a long distance runner, bicyclist in HS and avid backpacker... but standing on a concrete sales floor for years took some toll. A lot of the men used these socks for edema or better control, I think they add some comfort... so I am curious, could you expand on your thoughts?
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    Rocky makes a merino wool blend compression sock. Sold seasonally (hunting) at Wally World. $18.95?
    I like them a lot.
    "You don't have to think fast if you move slow" Red Green

  15. #15
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Yes I have them - but Rugby the dog loves to chew on them.... they don't last much... going to have to work on that... I have several mismatched pairs now...
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

    Woo

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Praha4 View Post
    I started using the Zensah calf compression sleeves last year on all hikes, they are well worth the money. http://www.zensah.com/men/men-leg-sl...g-sleeves.html
    I hadn't heard of these prior to reading this post. In 2006, my dreams of completing an AT thru hike were dashed by severe shin splints. I honestly believe that these injuries occurred on the long, paved downhill just outside of Blanding. I managed to hobble into Pearisburg, but it took me 4 weeks of rest and healing to get back on the trail. (I completed all but the Hanover to Monson leg that year and came back to finish in 2008.)

    I tried everything to protect my shins from further injury, including winding Ace bandages around my legs. Some days I'd wrap them one direction, others, I reversed the direction of the wrap. The compression helped a lot.

    One day in PA, I was restocking supplies at a large grocery store. While there I looked for new Ace bandages. That's when I discovered the Ace ankle compression tube. You've all seen it. You slip it over your foot and pull it part way up over your ankle. It's got a hole in the tube for your heal. The part around the foot is shorter and the ankle part is longer. I bought two.

    They were a bit tight at first, when I pulled them completely up and over my shins and calves. I put the heal holes on the backs of my calves to give them a bit more room. Plus, I realized that by not pulling them up as high as my knee, the lower, shorter section offered me additional ankle support.

    The difference in my shins was amazing. I took them with me on the CT in 2009. I believe I was starting my second day when I began descending the west side of section 1. I felt that old familiar twinge in my right shin. I immediately stopped, took off my boots and pulled my ankle tubes up over my shins and calves. Since wearing them, I have not suffered from shin splints again.

    I'm going to purchase a pair of these sleeves to determine how they compare to the ankle brace tubes I've been using for the same purpose. I don't care what other think about these compression sleeves. I don't care if others think hikers should or shouldn't use hiking poles, or wear trail runners or boots, or use aqua mira or filters, or any of the dozens of other topics that are argued on WB. I'm 62. Also getting older and fatter from sitting behind a desk. I miss the trail every day. If any of these or other products will help me stay on the trail a bit longer in my lifetime, them I'm gonna use them.

    Thanks to Squeeze and Pra!

    PS... I have no idea what the "long run" might be for me, so will somebody please pass the testosterone?
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  17. #17

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    The other two side benefits I've happily taken notice of while wearing calf compression sleeves is that they add to my warmth and help protect my shins from getting badly scratched and mutilated on hikes where I'm pushing through briars, etc. but still want to hike in running shorts. Convertibles or simply pants don't provide the same overall balance of versatility and benefits as the running shorts/calf compression sleeve combination.

    And, in case you're ever crazy enough to do a hike like this on Dec 31 through frozen Buckskin Gulch/Paria River the compression sleeves by themselves or over thermal bottoms or under Schoeller fabric pants, like my hiking companion Walkie Talkie wore that day, will help protect your shins while breaking through and hiking through the floating sheets of ice. Of course he made his own compression sleeves by cutting off the legs of an old 2 mmm Neoprene wet suit. I thought he had a great idea. I wore the Schoeller fabric pants and my shins were bruised and slashed from the ice by the end of the first day. I was relatively clean though. He was full of frozen mud.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=743xGGcXvb0

  18. #18

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    Sorry you all, I just noticed I was in the old broke dick forum

    Sounds like many of you all may have the requisite medical issues, but I would argue that there's a better remedy to that than compression socks...

    If you see in these links some think they may not even help at all, but then again I don't have any experience with them, so I'll just leave a couple more links and butt out of this old fart forum



    http://www.livestrong.com/article/32...ion-stockings/

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0820163107.htm

  19. #19
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    Get off the grass you young , punk, whippersnapper! It ain't broke! Just worn down!
    "You don't have to think fast if you move slow" Red Green

  20. #20

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    Age, experience, and cunning will beat the snot out of youth and enthusiasm 9 out of 10 times...

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