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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Time Zone View Post
    I've got one too, but I wonder about the aluminum being hard to clean, if you do more than boil water in it. I haven't used aluminum at home in years and I think that's the reason. Any tricks for dealing with it in the field? Just make everything really soupy?
    i just eat out of it then add a little water and scrape with my plastic spoon till its clean and drink up...any thing beyond that i clean with a small 1 inch square scrubby.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Time Zone View Post
    I've got one too, but I wonder about the aluminum being hard to clean, if you do more than boil water in it. I haven't used aluminum at home in years and I think that's the reason. Any tricks for dealing with it in the field? Just make everything really soupy?
    We eat out of the pot then boil more water to make tea.
    That cleans the food remnants from the pot pretty well.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Time Zone View Post
    I've got one too, but I wonder about the aluminum being hard to clean, if you do more than boil water in it. I haven't used aluminum at home in years and I think that's the reason. Any tricks for dealing with it in the field? Just make everything really soupy?
    I cook in my pot my Olicamp XTS but it's anodized so it's pretty easy to clean. Not been a problem. But on the other hand, I just bring the food and water to boil in the pot and then put in a pot cozy to finish, so the food is very soupy while the burner is on (although not necessarily when it's done).

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    Even with a cheap aluminum pot, it's not that hard to cook without a mess sticking to the pot. I use two pots, either 1 and 2 liter or 2 and 3, depending on group size and menu. Cook in the smaller one (carefully), boil water after in the larger one for hot drinks and cleanup. It works fine, with a modest cost in weight. My cooking gear is several decades old, for a very low cost per meal of usage. Of course, non cook is an option too, at least in warm weather.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkroberts96 View Post
    I'm looking for advice about what size pot we should bring for a thru-hike with two people. One being myself (I eat an average amount), one being my boyfriend (usually eats larger meals). Are there certain brands/types of pots that y'all like? Would we be better off bringing two one-person pots and just cooking our meals in sequence?
    I am not a thru hiker. I only occasionally have to share my pot but, there isn't a better value than the IMUSA 12 cm cup. https://www.walmart.com/ip/IMUSA-USA...ilver/15040697

    It is perfect for everything you'd want to do with your MSR stove. Two cups H20 boils quickly. Great size for simmering. Venture toward dry baking if you'd like.
    An 8 oz fuel canister fits inside perfectly.

    A If you are lucky enough to find them in stock at a local retailer, it will list for less than $5. Buying one online will cost more in shipping than the cost of the product.

    Tinny at Minibull Design makes a nice $10 lid to fit it. https://www.minibulldesign.com/produ...?idCategory=10

    Good Luck

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    That pot looks much like the Mainstays (WM) or IMUSA (Target) grease dispenser that sells locally for about $7, with lid. Same capacity, and I've noticed too that a 220g fuel canister fits nicely.

    In reply to those upthread, yes, I've done the "clean with water and drink the grey water" thing. Having tried some Skurka meals at home first, before going into the field, I can advise, be very very careful about parmesan! Whoa nellie, what a sticky mess if it melts onto the inside of your pot - extraordinarily hard to clean at home, can't imagine doing so on the trail. Allegedly avoidable if you mix it in at sufficiently low temps, but I'll tell ya, once bitten twice shy.

  7. #27
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    I always have a piece of a plastic net bag that onions come in to use as a pot scrubber for cleaning.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Time Zone View Post
    That pot looks much like the Mainstays (WM) or IMUSA (Target) grease dispenser that sells locally for about $7, with lid. Same capacity, and I've noticed too that a 220g fuel canister fits nicely. ...

    ...
    The IMUSA cup is a heavier gauge metal with a stronger handle. The cup is more robust than the grease pot. Also simpler lines make the Cup easier to clean.

    A second option to consider might be the Deep Alipine Banks Fry Bake pan. https://frybake.com

    I got mine for canoe tripping and frying fish over a wood fire but, it could function as the sole pan/pot for a hiking duo. The Alpine size an ideal diameter if you decide to fry eggs or pancakes. The Deep version holds enough to add some veggies to your ramen. It is a spendy option and significantly heavier than other proposed options but not too heavy to earn a spot in your pack.

  9. #29

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    I am a long time evernew fan. Light & simple. I have used the .75 & 1 liter pasta pot for years now. 1 what I would consider the last remaining original pieces of gear I have. I enjoy the strainer on top, and the only thing I boil in it would be ramen. The 1 liter was far too large for me as a single hiker, but I think even the .75 L would be more than enough for simply boiling water.
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