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  1. #1

    Default Some folks have less time than that and are down to a few weeks.

    https://youtu.be/qhAz-DcMIa0

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  2. #2

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    Thanks ramdino, this youtuber list has been super helpful to me to be able to follow along other hikers from the class of 2019! Do you know if there are other overviews available for trail journals, podcasts etc.? I'm consuming any information about next year's AT season I can get my hands on at the moment.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3step View Post
    Thanks ramdino, this youtuber list has been super helpful to me to be able to follow along other hikers from the class of 2019! Do you know if there are other overviews available for trail journals, podcasts etc.? I'm consuming any information about next year's AT season I can get my hands on at the moment.
    Glad your enjoying it 3step. I just keep searching and finding others. All the info I have I am passing along
    Looking forward to your hike. I'm a veteran so I appreciate your comments in your video.


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    Ramdino Roaming the Trails

  4. #4

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    Umm, parts of NC, northern GA, VA, upstate SC, and TN, those receiving about 100' of rainfall annually, were already considered a temperate deciduous rain forest, for as long as I've been alive. GSMNP at the higher elevations typically is thought of by biologists, Climatologists, and meteorologists as on the border of being a temperate rain forest. Clingmans Dome for example sometimes meets the annual rainfall amount at 85" plus. Gorges SP straddling the NC/SC border on the BR Escarpment is another place. Most know about the Pacific Northwest rain forests but what throws some off is they perceive rain forests as having to be tropical.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Umm, parts of NC, northern GA, VA, upstate SC, and TN, those receiving about 100' of rainfall annually, were already considered a temperate deciduous rain forest, for as long as I've been alive. GSMNP at the higher elevations typically is thought of by biologists, Climatologists, and meteorologists as on the border of being a temperate rain forest. Clingmans Dome for example sometimes meets the annual rainfall amount at 85" plus. Gorges SP straddling the NC/SC border on the BR Escarpment is another place. Most know about the Pacific Northwest rain forests but what throws some off is they perceive rain forests as having to be tropical.
    Tks Dogwood, information I had not thought of. I'm in the Piedmont foothills region and we just dont get the kind of rain we have gotten. We're are about 20"surplus for the year. It all seems to have come in the last 120 days. Trees are falling everywhere due to the over saturated ground.

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    Ramdino Roaming the Trails

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