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  1. #1

    Default Sleeping pad recommendation

    I've decided to look at a self inflating sleeping pad for my hike. Currently I use a foam pad and a pool air mattress. It works and it's comfortable.
    It's aslo bulky.
    Can anyone recommend a pad that cost $50 or less and is lightweight .

  2. #2
    Registered User stilllife's Avatar
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    check out rei garage

  3. #3

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    A decent quality self inflating sleeping pad for $50 or less? Good luck.

    Walmart sells self-inflating sleeping pads below $50---Coleman, Western Owl Outfitters, Stansport. I'd run screaming from these products. That's just me.

  4. #4
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
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    products can be cheap, light, and durable - but you can only pick 2

  5. #5

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    How about non self inflating.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gracebowen View Post
    I've decided to look at a self inflating sleeping pad for my hike. Currently I use a foam pad and a pool air mattress. It works and it's comfortable.
    It's aslo bulky.
    Can anyone recommend a pad that cost $50 or less and is lightweight .
    Thermarest sells a version of the Trail Scout in Walmart stores that might go for a bit less than the $55 that the regular Trail Scout sells for at REI. It's labeled with what looks like the same warranty. I forget the alternative name, but it looks the same. Might not have a stuff sack. This is NOT a knock-off by some other brand. It is a Thermarest product.

    At 1", it's a thin self-inflator, but claims an R-value of 3.4. 22 ounces and 4.4L in bulk, which is compact for a self-inflator. 72"x20"x1".

    Several other options if you relax your constraints either $ or weight or style. For inflatable, you could look at Klymit's insulated static V, $70 with pillow at Costco. Claims an R-value of 4.4, weight of 25 oz, bulk of 3L, dimensions 72x23x2.5 (inches). But I've never seen one that long in real life. I've measured 2 Klymit pads that claimed 72" length and they were both 68" long. They were, however, as wide as claimed.

    You used to be able to find the insulated static v for about $50-$55 without the pillow, but at the moment prices are higher. Probably a seasonal thing. Their uninsulated static V2 is only 16 oz and 1L in bulk. You could combine that with a small z-rest on the outside of your pack for "insurance" and probably sleep adequately warm for about the same weight as the insulated static V. Much more bulk (but not IN the pack) and almost double the expense, but it does have additional protection should you get a leak or tear that you can't remedy with their patch kit.

  7. #7
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    Buy insulated pads in the Spring when weather is turning warmer.

  8. #8

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    +1 on checking out the Klymit inflatible pads - picked up one for $40 from one of the discounted sites last year, liked it better than my $100 Flash pad from REI

  9. #9

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    I actually found an older thermarest on Austin Craigslist.

    Thermarest performance series ultralight.

    I'm not sure what it actually weighs though.
    They want $25 for it.

  10. #10

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    Here's the picture they sent me
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
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    I had one of those, though it was a different size. It's an older model, and probably not as lightweight as current Thermarests -- though I remember it being pretty light at the time. It's probably around two pounds.

    I would check a few things, (1) blow it all the way up, really full, and bend it in half or sit on it to make sure there are no leaks. Wait a few minutes and see if it deflates at all. (2) check the outside for any delamination, and (3) smell the air coming out when opening the valve to see if it's mildewed inside.

    If it's in decent condition, and you're ok with the weight, $25 is fine.
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigcranky View Post
    probably not as lightweight as current Thermarests
    Some current Thermarest self-inflators save weight and bulk by boring holes in the foam core. I would think this affects the insulating ability of such pads, though I've not seen TAR concede this through a drop their claimed R-values. It will be interesting to see changes what the new R-value standard brings.

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    Check out STP. https://www.sierratradingpost.com/kl...-sim-prod171TR

    Check STP 30-80% coupon codes for more savings getting you easily under $50

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Check out STP. https://www.sierratradingpost.com/kl...-sim-prod171TR

    Check STP 30-80% coupon codes for more savings getting you easily under $50
    Thank you for the link.
    I'm leaning towards the klymit v
    Or the Alps mountaineer but jeez it's yellow lol
    I'm a side sleeper and my left hip tends to hurt even at home.

  15. #15

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    Exped Pads on Ebay

    I would prefer getting a used Exped pad than a $50 new pad. If the Exped pad fails you(They yellow ones are an older model, and became known for blowing the baffles out) then exped will send you a replacement(orange honeycomb new version) free of charge. Its a cant be beat deal in my book
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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Check out STP. https://www.sierratradingpost.com/kl...-sim-prod171TR

    Check STP 30-80% coupon codes for more savings getting you easily under $50
    STP kinda went to ***** when they were sold/merged to TJX. almost no extra percentages off anymore. Still some solid deals to be had, but a shell of it's former glorous self!....They have a code for free shipping, but that's about it. NOT what it once was unfortunately.

  17. #17
    GSMNP 900 Miler
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    Quote Originally Posted by gracebowen View Post
    Here's the picture they sent me
    The only thing "ultralight" about that pad is that it's only 1" thick.

    The current ProLite series weights right at a pound, and it saves weight by cutting out parts of the pad like Time Zone mentioned, and it's also mummy shaped. I doubt that used one for $25 weights 2 pounds, but it will be somewhere in the neighborhood of a pound and a half. If it doesn't have any leaks... then yea, for $25 it's a good starter pad.

    But you might want to look at something more serious (in weight savings AND comfort) if you're planning a Thru with this.
    I've loved my Therm-a-rest XLite. It's not self inflating, but its more than 2" thick and has been good for me down to freezing (3 season use). The regular size is only 12oz, while the LARGE (which is what I have... got tired of my arms draping off the sides of a thick 20" wide pad) is right at a pound. But I've never realistically seen the regular at less than about $100, while the Large full retail is something like $180. (Got mine during REI's annual Memorial Day sale where you can buy one regularly priced item for 20% off).

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    Quote Originally Posted by gracebowen View Post
    Thank you for the link.
    I'm leaning towards the klymit v
    Keep in mind that one is basically uninsulated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gambit McCrae View Post
    If the Exped pad fails you(They yellow ones are an older model, and became known for blowing the baffles out) then exped will send you a replacement(orange honeycomb new version) free of charge. Its a cant be beat deal in my book
    That's contrary to the terms of their written warranty, which appears to be limited to 5 years (2 on UL products).

    http://www.exped.com/usa/en/repairs-usa

    Granted, companies sometimes go above and beyond the written word of their warranty, but it appears to me that the OP can't be assured of having that experience.

  20. #20
    Registered User lonehiker's Avatar
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    I wouldn't skimp too much on a sleeping pad. You do spend a lot of time on them and a good night's sleep is important. I use the Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite (small 8 oz) Sleeping Pad accompanied with a closed cell pad cut to the same dimensions. The closed cell can be placed under the Xlite for added protection or on top for additional insulation value. Total combined weight is appx 10.6 oz and this system is quite versatile. I use a GG closed cell pad but have used a cheap walmart blue pad in the past (it is a bit heavier). Using the short pad does require that I use my backpack for my lower legs.
    Lonehiker

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