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  1. #1

    Default Are there places where a hammock is not useable/possible?

    Hi guys,
    I'm sure there are tons of threads which handle that topic but I can't find them.
    I'm starting to get some information if a hammock is a good choice for the trail (it is) and if there are places where it is not usable. Maybe because of rules or because of somebody steals all the trees.
    So I got the whiteblazes shelter.pdf (amazing!) and found out that behind Fontana Dam are no hammock symbols. Why?

    Hope you like to help me.

  2. #2
    Registered User tarditi's Avatar
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    Not sure of the specific reason, but we can add to the rules or tree-thief theories:

    Hammocks (when occupied) can apply side-load to the structure you have the straps attached to - youtube will show plenty of cautionary tales of folks attaching them to pillars under decks, etc. for instance.
    There may be concern that trees with fragile root systems may be damaged.

    There could also be a nuisance factor where folks might hang in areas that would never be tented

  3. #3

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    I hammocked not far from the Fontana "Hilton" not far from the water. Where there are trees, there is usually a way.

  4. #4
    imscotty's Avatar
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    First let me state the obvious that hammocks should not be attached to or used inside of shelters.

    The only problem area I can see is the GSMNF where the rules require you to stay in a shelter if space is available, but really how much of a problem is that?

    For the rest of the AT I would argue that a hammock is an excellent choice and opens up more camp choices and opportunities than tenting.
    “For of all sad words of tongue or pen,
    the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


    John Greenleaf Whittier

  5. #5

    Default

    The reason for my question is that I want to figure out what kind of insulation I'll have to bring: my underquilt or a pad. I think it's common sense that underquilts offered a lot more comfort. But when I have to go to the ground (e.q. shelter) it's worthless. So if there are areas like the GSMNF that means it's better to carry a pad?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by BeInNature View Post
    The reason for my question is that I want to figure out what kind of insulation I'll have to bring: my underquilt or a pad. I think it's common sense that underquilts offered a lot more comfort. But when I have to go to the ground (e.q. shelter) it's worthless. So if there are areas like the GSMNF that means it's better to carry a pad?
    I hike in places that sometimes have no trees, or have designated sites where trees are not suitable (too big and/or far apart). I carry both an underquilt and a small ccf pad.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  7. #7
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    We don't need to sleep every night of an AT thru in a hung hammock. Options. There is the ground and there are AT shelters. I've seen some nifty hammockers set up hammocks on the ground using trekking poles. If you have a removable hex tarp set up under a tarp. Shouldn't hurt a night here or there. You shouldn't have many issues hanging though.

    You don't want a rigid mindset on a thru. Being able to cheerfully adapt is a great asset to bring to a LD hike. From all I've observed in the many German backpackers I know they are one Nationality that seems to always be adaptable.
    Zusammenreimen. Zum Funktionieren bringen.

  8. #8

    Default

    Ok, thanks to all. I think I got it. And I'll bring a pad. I'll be more flexible with it and can use it everywhere.
    @Federall Bill: I think it's to heavy to bring both of them. For a weekender, ok but (and you did'nt have the information) on a thru it would not be my choice.

    @Dogwood: Man you make me laughing! Appreciate your well spoken German! :-)
    Using poles to go to the ground is possible (or not: https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...rekking-Poles?) but man - see the beauty (my hammock not my girl friend) on the ground makes me sad. ;-)

    Maybe I want to switch to my next question and it fits under this topic. IMSCOTTY said that there are some rules where it is allowed to camp for example in the GSMNF. Beside those areas - is it allowed to stop one mile in front of a shelter and stay away from it? Or do I have to go there?

  9. #9
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    For those with an AT GSMNP thru permit through GSMNP you have to stay at the lean to's.

    ROTFL. You'll fit right in.

    My spoken German is actually dismal but that's a bit of writing what I leaned from having patient German and German speaking French and Swiss GF's. I wasn't positive if I had written it correctly.

  10. #10

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    Must be awesome girls if they have this impact on you!

    I found a nice description of "where is it allow to camp an where not": https://thetrek.co/appalachian-trail...lachian-trail/
    On this page is a link which leads to appalachiantrail.org where I found a pdf with everything I need. Great!
    Thanks to all for helping me out and till next time.

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