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  1. #1
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    Default Water/Camp Shoes

    Just curious what most of you use for camp and stream crossing shoes. I have a pair of down booties for around camp, but I feel maybe I need a pair of lightweight shoes for stream crossings or for around camp when my trail runners are wet. Prefer something lighter than Crocs. I have used my trail runners for crossings after removing socks. Don't like wet shoes in the winter.

  2. #2
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    https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/redh...-shoes-for-men

    lighter then crocs and perfect for crossings/camp shoes. They don't pack down well but super light and I just strapped them on the outside the whole trip. It's not material that retains any water either, dry right away like sandals but nice and secure for streams and stuff.
    NoDoz
    nobo 2018 March 10th - October 19th
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    I'm just one too many mornings and 1,000 miles behind

  3. #3
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    What is the weight on those?

  4. #4

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    At one time I used neoprene scuba diver boots. A little bulky though. Now days you can get neoprene socks.
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  5. #5
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    about 9.5oz for the pair


    edit: this is for size 11
    Last edited by LazyLightning; 03-03-2019 at 19:42.
    NoDoz
    nobo 2018 March 10th - October 19th
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    I'm just one too many mornings and 1,000 miles behind

  6. #6

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    It's hard to believe I backpacked for 30 years without bringing camp shoes or creek shoes---in them days we took off our boots and waded a ford barefoot. And in camp we just lived in our unlaced boots---whether muddy or wet or not. Nobody brought any kind of second shoes.

    How things have changed. Now I would never consider heading out without my crocs---used as camp shoes of course because once I remove my boots I don't want to see them again until the next morning. (In deep snow of course the crocs don't work as camp shoes---back to the boots).

    And crocs make great crossing shoes and can be worn permanently on a trail with alot of fords---likes Jacks River with 42 crossings or Conasauga with 38 or Slickrock Creek with 12. Which means you're backpacking in the things all day.

    And crocs also make a great sit pad in the snow during reststops.

    TRIP 104 068-L.jpg
    Crocs are mandatory during the winter if you want to keep your boots dry for as long as possible.

    TRIP 135 025-L.jpg
    Crocs in action on Slickrock Creek.

  7. #7
    Registered User soilman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncwild View Post
    What is the weight on those?
    I have a similar pair that I bought at WalMart about 6 years ago. They weigh 10 oz. I strap them on to the outside of my pack. Part of the back band on one broke but they are still usable.
    More walking, less talking.

  8. #8

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    I wear a pair of Cushe shoes. They have a canvas upper, and spongy sole. They weigh 11.74 oz. for a pair of mens size 10.5. I started the trail with a pair of rubbery/plastic pair of camp shoes, but I didn't like them in camp. In camp, I wanted my feet to dry out for the evening. In the cold, they trapped moisture, and were chilly. In the warmth, they trapped moisture and were sweaty.

    The canvas tops solved those problems... and it looks like they might be discontinued as I'm only seeing them used, or for stupid prices.

  9. #9
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    I found these a few years back and like them a lot (seem to have more grip than Crocs, which are super slippery on certain surfaces and won't slip off as easy in moving water crossings). pricey but I shopped around and got a very good deal on clearance.

    Vivo barefoot shoes link; https://www.vivobarefoot.com/us/mens...ns?colour=Navy

  10. #10
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    Between late spring and early fall 90 - 95% of the time I use the same trail runners normally hiked in. When it's cold and wet I may carry a pr of WP socks and 2nd different pr of socks, often merino wool. I'm constantly rotating the socks aiming to always have one dry pr while on trail and have access to in town laundering on trails like the AT every 4-7 days during resupply. Plus laundering socks is about one of the simplest things to rinse on trail...not in potable water sources. I may layer both pr simultaneously when very cold. When it's cold and dry or the backpacking involves mixed weather with snow travel, wet cold weather, during winter, or under highly transitional weather periods like going from winter to early spring like on an AT NOBO starting in Feb or early Mar I may opt for WP shoes at the start. Since experiencing frost nip on extremities on my feet and hands once as a hunter and winter fisherman and overall all season roamer/hiker/etc when winter I do carry UL down socks which are worn when feet are dry in my sleep system. For me, I happily accept the 2.4 oz wt penalty for foot specific dry warmth.

    Since I approach LD backpacking/"thru hiking" more as a hiker than camper or doing other things that are stationary, often on the move 13- 14 or more hrs in a 24 hr period, when I do stop hiking I'm in my bag or quilt typically within 15-20 mins. It's typically sleep or be on the move. I typically take care of my feet at this time. Hence I don't need walk around in camp shoes unless I'm integrating backpacking with fishing, photography, etc. after I set up a base camp from which to further adventure and explore. What one does on extended backpacking trips or how one approaches hiking might be considered if they need camp shoes. Initial footwear choice and anticipating the trail or route conditions plays into this too. Since tending to vastly more often opt for non WP light wt trail runners or low cut hikers shoes tend to dry faster. Personally I address not having high odds of continually experiencing wet feet often with an lightly or uninsulated WP sock in milder or somewhat mixed conditions. If very cold and still opting for lift trail runners I may switch to more insulated WP sock while having that second merino pr. This can give my feet three separate options with a fourth in winter when adding Goosefeet down socks into the mix for use while on the move or "in camp."

    For me, typical approaches to LD backpacking means the Goosefeet socks, which I bought with the over booties yrs ago, are virtually unused. Why? I don't walk around camp very much if at all on LD backpacking trips. If you are considering down socks does your brand have non integrated removable over booties as the Goosefeet brand which can be used with the down socks if you do anticipate much wandering around camp time? Could the overbooties also be used for steam crossings?. Don't use the over booties with the down socks if wet. Some down sock brands are more designed for walking around with protective minimalist soles. This at least could address your in camp "shoe" question. It also may mean not hauling yet another type of footwear.


    If I do get wet feet occasionally when it's warmer, about above 40-45* it's not the end of the world. I seek to keep my feet from getting so macerated skin splits or hot spots and blisters or fungus causes problems by being constantly wet. Some of this is achieved when appropriately matching footwear to the hiking conditions and taking care of feet each day over the long term.

  11. #11

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    water shoes.jpgI saw my first pair of Croc type shoes in the late nineties, I think they were called Waldie's back then and they were all the rage with the thru hikers. I've carried several different camp shoes since then but always go back to Croc's. They're lightweight and airy, very comfortable and easy to wash in a stream, and yes they are hard to pack but hang nicely on the outside of the pack with a piece of shock cord.
    "every day's a holiday, every meal a feast"

  12. #12

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    I prefer SealSkinz with a light wool liner from REI and Altra trail runners.So long as the water is not deeper than the top of the sock they work great.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by elray View Post
    water shoes.jpgI saw my first pair of Croc type shoes in the late nineties, I think they were called Waldie's back then and they were all the rage with the thru hikers. I've carried several different camp shoes since then but always go back to Croc's. They're lightweight and airy, very comfortable and easy to wash in a stream, and yes they are hard to pack but hang nicely on the outside of the pack with a piece of shock cord.
    Correctamundo.

  14. #14
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    If opting for the WP sock addition there are WP socks with tight sealing ankles that don't allow water in. I have worn such socks in cold weather frigid water with old trail runner low cuts or tennis shoes while wading for hrs fishing in depths up to my knees with shorter WP socks completely submerged. Getting back to the car taking these WP socks off my feet are completely dry. I have experienced similar many times wearing WP socks backpacking all day in rain in colder temps. Switch off to the warm dry merino socks once in camp taking the WP socks off feet are completely dry.

    One type of camp shoe I may use in Hawaii or other coastal hikes in addition to wearing trail runners while hiking where I may integrate water activities such as combing reefs, exploring tidal flats or sea caves, snorkeling, foraging for sea vegetables, clamming, etc on backpacking or hiking trips are very light reef walkers. They are basically thin Lycra or light Neoprene with a very thin light wt attached sole. They are very grippy designed much like Vibram Five Fingers but are more like slippers. They are sold in some WalMarts, tackle and bait stores, etc in HI and elsewhere in coastal areas like in the Pacific Northwest and probably on the east coast for less than $10. They are good for most stream fords as well. They are more protective to the instep and forefoot than Crocs. New Crocs have an advantage in providing sole cushioning. If considering Crocs for fords get Crocs or Croc knock offs with the heel strap so they stay on better. The pts of where they attach the heel stop can irritate some folks feet and that is a common place of Croc failure. I've observed many pr of discarded Crocs where the hell start has been removed or places of attachment has deteriorated.


    When it gets warmer though the approach I've embraced is opting for fast drying hiking shoes and simply doing the fords rather than constantly taking shoes off and putting shoes back on.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by LazyLightning View Post
    Been recommending these for years. Got me a pair from walmart many years ago. Mine are about a size 9 and are really close to 8oz for the pair.

    Quote Originally Posted by 4shot View Post
    I've tried finding a pair of these in recent years, but they seem like they have been discontinued. The link only has the largest size available.
    Anyone know where the full range of sizes of these available?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post

    I've tried finding a pair of these in recent years, but they seem like they have been discontinued. The link only has the largest size available.
    Anyone know where the full range of sizes of these available?
    It's my fault you can't find them...seems like every time I find something that i really like, it is then discontinued. Extremely frustrating. Sometimes newer isn't always better. i may just buy an extra pair and set them aside. My current pair plus one more in backup should just about certainly see me through my backpacking days.

  17. #17

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    Where do I purchase a pair of WP socks that fit tight enough to work when totally submerged?I would like to try a pair.Thanks DW.

  18. #18
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    Default Here are come cheap ones

    They go by Zhuanglin or Aleader or Socone but I'm pretty sure they are all the same thing.

    I got them for a weekend hike that included water crossings. I don't know about their reliability over time, but they worked great for me in the Porcupine "Mountains," as we in the terrain-starved Midwest call these Upper Peninsula hills. Get one size up.


    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=Zhuanglin...f=nb_sb_noss_2

  19. #19
    Registered User cneill13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LazyLightning View Post
    https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/redh...-shoes-for-men

    lighter then crocs and perfect for crossings/camp shoes. They don't pack down well but super light and I just strapped them on the outside the whole trip. It's not material that retains any water either, dry right away like sandals but nice and secure for streams and stuff.
    Thanks for posting this. I have been looking for a new pair of water shoes.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
    Been recommending these for years. Got me a pair from walmart many years ago. Mine are about a size 9 and are really close to 8oz for the pair.

    I've tried finding a pair of these in recent years, but they seem like they have been discontinued. The link only has the largest size available.
    Anyone know where the full range of sizes of these available?
    I left a pair of size 10.5 Vivo barefoots in a hiker box in TN, I hated them. They weighed a good bit more than expected as well, as the more recently (2016) manufactured ones don't have a removable insole. The tops were less flexible than I expected, and pretty much always felt clammy and non breathable as a camp shoe. As a water shoe, they weren't even particularly grippy. I also recall paying way too much at the site that had my size.

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