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  1. #21
    Registered User Maineiac64's Avatar
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    The gopro thread was interesting, I have been playing with time lapse photos from pack strap and you do get some very cool pictures you wouldn’t get otherwise. The new hero7 has some incredible features all in a very tiny form factor.

  2. #22

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    I do like to have the camera close at hand and easy to get to, because you just never know when you'll need it to capture a wildlife scene.

    I bought a smallish DSLR like FUJIFILM camera with 20mm lens a few years back. Kind of one step up from a shirt pocket deal. Never did figure out how to comfortably carry it, so gave up. It just got in the way.

    My little S+P Samsung with 16 meg image does a pretty good job, even though a photo might need a little post production tweaking to make it really stand out. Fall foliage and sunsets come to mind. Sadly, my trusty Samsung has seen better days and it just might have to be replaced.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  3. #23

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    One of the most experienced photographer thru hikers...

    Recommends a sony rx100 for hiking purposes.

    Unless your absolutely after the $$$ making shots.

    Nicholas "Click" Richards

    The next camera he recommended was a sony a6xxx family.

    Why run a dslr when you can get a mirrorless for smaller/lighter?



    Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk

  4. #24
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    [QUOTE=
    Why run a dslr when you can get a mirrorless for smaller/lighter?



    Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk[/QUOTE] Because he already owns one?
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  5. #25
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fastfoxengineering View Post
    One of the most experienced photographer thru hikers...

    Recommends a sony rx100 for hiking purposes.



    I have two Sony RX100 cameras. There are now six models. The versions III, IV, and V all have a fast 24-70mm equivalent lens, and the VI model has a slower 24-200mm eq. lens.

    Advantages: 1-inch Sony sensor is excellent in good light and very good in poor light - especially with the faster lens. All models from III onward have a tiny pop-up electronic viewfinder that I can hold up to my eye so I can see what I am shooting. Lenses are very good, overall resolution is excellent. Noise is well controlled for a small sensor. The 1-inch sensor is significantly larger than a typical p+s camera, and infinitely larger than your phone's sensor. The camera folds up to the size of a pack of cigarettes and easily slides into the tiny front pocket of my waist pack. Easy access.

    Disadvantages: It's super expensive; the latest model VI is $1200. It's still a point and shoot, with tiny controls, a tiny switch to zoom the lens, difficult to hold, slow to shoot, etc. Compared to a DSLR the files are not as good and it doesn't take interchangeable lenses. Compared to a phone, it's a single-use device that can't make phone calls or play music or show you the weather radar. The batteries are tiny and don't last long, so bring at least one spare, and also a wall charger (though it can be charged with a micro USB cable from your USB smartphone charger too.)

    Comments: I've been making a living taking pictures since 1987. I've shot with every kind of camera system out there, from Instamatics to 4x5 field cameras. My current kit is all Fujifilm, including the big digital medium format GFX system that cost as much as my car and probably weighs the same, too.

    I would not travel anywhere, especially on the trail, without my little Sony. I often bring two of them, the III and the VI, because of the different lenses. (OK, not when hiking.) I get high quality images that make even me happy, from a tiny camera that fits in my waist pack and is thus always available.

    Yeah, it's super expensive and I don't recommend it for most people. I think it's a good choice for photo enthusiasts, professional photogs, etc. If you're considering bringing a DSLR on a long hike, *and* you have the cash, the RX100 is a much better choice IMHO. If you just want pix of the hike, modern smartphones make very good photos. (My wife shot all her Long Trail photos on an iPhone 5 and I was able to make some great prints up to 11x14 out of the files.)

    Happy trails!
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  6. #26
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    Thanks, I looked it up and found this nice explanation of all the differences.

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora...-rx100-edition

    One of the original versions might be very handy and sort of reasonable. I've been really enjoying trotting around shooting wildlife and frigid landscapes with my new 18-300mm zoom, but with the camera body, it's a 2 1/2 brick that I might be wanting to mail home if I'm slogging up a mountain in 90+ degree heat.

  7. #27
    Is it raining yet?
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    Check out the Canon Powershot G series. Point and shoot size w/ DSLR capabilities.
    Be Prepared

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by bighammer View Post
    ... Just wondering if I'm crazy to consider it, or if others have found a decent way to bring one along.
    I agree with those who have recommended getting a camera that weighs less, but if you do decide to take your heavy DSLR, this is the best way I found. I tried a number of different methods but didn't like to have the weight of the camera on my neck and wanted to have my hands free to use hiking poles.

    I rigged a camera case so that it connected to the straps of my back pack. The strap of the camera was around my neck, but the weight was on the straps. It provided easy access to the camera and left my hands free.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Shutterbug

  9. #29

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    I agree with all the old timers here, they have solid advice. After 2 days that camera case is going to feel heavy, especially after you resupply. My camera case recently broke the shoulder strap on my pack where it was attached by carabiner. The camera pouch and all my SLR gear was 1 lb, but it can still be annoying. Lots of folks have done it though, so it's about what you can tolerate carrying.

    I realized I could have something 1/4 the weight and take up 1/14 of the space. If you could find a used A6000 or even 5100, that could work and the mirrorless APSC sensors still do very well. Sony's have pretty shotty battery life so expect to carry several batteries and a bulky charger. But at the same time, something with at least an APSC sized sensor with a FIXED lens will be much less hassle. Just make sure whatever you choose is based on the features you think you'll need (long exposure, HDR built in, syncs with smart phones etc).

  10. #30

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    Bring what you need for most of the photos you will take. New pals met along the way, meal photos at camp, and a few view snapshots only need basic cameras found in simple digital pocket cameras or cell phones. If you are prone to finding that perfect photograph and waiting for long periods of time as lighting changes to capture the scene, the heavier SLR/DSLR cameras are going to probably be the better bet.

    I typically take a Canon PowerShot with me regardless of what I am doing. However if I am going to someplace special like the Pacific Northwest I will most definitely bring the DSLR along as well for those defining photos. The minor extra weight of the DSLR will be long forgotten and the photograph enjoyed far longer.

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