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  1. #21
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    I think that the main attraction is the flame itself.
    A bit like the look and feel of a wood fire compared to the pretend type.
    I was fortunate enough to spend 3 winters with a wood fire in the lounge room and one in my bedroom. I suspect that I will miss them this winter...

  2. #22
    Registered User Christoph's Avatar
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    I use my LED head gear flashlight. Couldn't imagine using a candle in my tent.... but to contradict myself, I have been known to cook on my pocket rocket in my vestibule. Hmmm.......
    - Trail name: Thumper

  3. #23

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    Used to carry one on trips with boy scouts. I often left it in the fire ring as a night light for the younger boys. Surprising how much area they can light up. Not bright,but enough for that midnight potty trip.

  4. #24

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    Not a candle lantern, but I often carry a couple of birthday cake candles. They make nice fire starters the rare times I make a campfire. But a trick I learned in the Boy Scouts is to light one in your tent (carefully) before bed. Any mosquitos in your tent will fly to the light and burn.
    Go afield with a good attitude, with respect for the wildlife you hunt, and the forest and field in which you walk. Immerse yourself in the outdoor experience. It will cleanse your soul.--Fred Bear

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  5. #25
    Registered User Hikes in Rain's Avatar
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    I use the birthday cake candles as firestarters, too. Especially like the "can't blow 'em out" kind.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maui Rhino View Post
    .............But a trick I learned in the Boy Scouts is to light one in your tent (carefully) before bed. Any mosquitos in your tent will fly to the light and burn.
    Great idea !!
    If you don't stand for something, you will fall for anything.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarcasm the elf View Post
    I do not use one solely because my current tent is made of sil-nylon which is far more flamable than the older style nylon/polyurethane tents and itís not worth the risk. I have used similar candle lanterns in the past with other tents.
    I'm curious about the flammability of the sil-nylon (although not enough to test my self!) Obviously, one wouldn't let a flame make direct contact with the material, but does sil-nylon flame up if it just gets hot enough? Sorry to sound dense, but if I am then I am...
    fortis fortuna adjuvat

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoSpirits View Post
    I'm curious about the flammability of the sil-nylon (although not enough to test my self!) Obviously, one wouldn't let a flame make direct contact with the material, but does sil-nylon flame up if it just gets hot enough? Sorry to sound dense, but if I am then I am...
    Flame resistant coatings dont stick to silnylon. A reason you dont see it in mainstream camping tents.

  9. #29

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    Think Iíll just leave it in the 1990ís because Iíll be going to sleep when it gets dark and getting up early to make some miles. Iíll use my headlamp if I need to read over something a few mins

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    Flame resistant coatings dont stick to silnylon. A reason you dont see it in mainstream camping tents.
    So putting an open flame up against the material in the corner of the tent will cause it to burn. Good to know.
    fortis fortuna adjuvat

  11. #31
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    Flame resistant coatings dont stick to silnylon. A reason you dont see it in mainstream camping tents.
    The Hilleberg "Kerlon" is silnylon.

  12. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Franco View Post
    Flame resistant coatings dont stick to silnylon. A reason you dont see it in mainstream camping tents.
    The Hilleberg "Kerlon" is silnylon.
    In US, some states have mandated adherence to CPAI-84. Which is why you will never see some products for sale in them in brick and mortar stores.

    Ill consider hilleberg a mainstream tent when I see one at Cabelas, Bass Pro, or Dicks Sporting Goods .

    Most products that do have silylon, also have it PU coated on inside.

    My understanfing is the silicone strengthens fabric, and hinders it retracting away from heat before it ignites, which makes the uncoated polymer fabric flame resistant naturally.
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 03-24-2019 at 17:44.

  13. #33

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    Nylon will tend to melt before it burns but melting nylon dripping on you is not fun either. That's why being in a fire wearing nylon clothes is bad news. It melts and sticks to the skin.

    A candle lantern encloses the flame, so it mitigates the risk of an open flame inside a tent. You just have be careful while lighting it. Real careful.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  14. #34

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    I purchased the Uco mini lantern this winter. I only tested it once but was afraid of falling asleep with it burning so didn’t use it for long. Supposedly, the flame is extinguished if knocked over but putting it on a tin pie pan with some dirt might not be a bad idea. Alternatively, some beeswax candles on a tin pie plate may work just as well.

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traffic Jam View Post
    I purchased the Uco mini lantern this winter. I only tested it once but was afraid of falling asleep with it burning so didn’t use it for long. Supposedly, the flame is extinguished if knocked over but putting it on a tin pie pan with some dirt might not be a bad idea. Alternatively, some beeswax candles on a tin pie plate may work just as well.
    A candle lantern should be hung which improves it's safety since it can't be knocked over. Just don't knock your head into it

    I just tested my lantern. The candle goes out in about 5 seconds after tipping over. The top of the lantern gets pretty darn hot, I measure 180 degrees, so you still don't want to knock it over.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by TwigBoy View Post
    Think I’ll just leave it in the 1990’s because I’ll be going to sleep when it gets dark and getting up early to make some miles. I’ll use my headlamp if I need to read over something a few mins
    Some people do other things than "make miles".

  17. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by TwigBoy View Post
    Think Iíll just leave it in the 1990ís because Iíll be going to sleep when it gets dark and getting up early to make some miles. Iíll use my headlamp if I need to read over something a few mins
    Quote Originally Posted by AllDownhillFromHere View Post
    Some people do other things than "make miles".
    And some of us are out in the winter when the night lasts 12+ hours. By myself I tend to keep moving after dark, but that drops off dramatically on group trips. Setting up a candle lantern that creates a bit of light and warmth at minimal weight and risk can be easily justified under those conditions. On a 3 season trip the value drops quickly.

  18. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    A candle lantern should be hung which improves it's safety since it can't be knocked over. Just don't knock your head into it

    I just tested my lantern. The candle goes out in about 5 seconds after tipping over. The top of the lantern gets pretty darn hot, I measure 180 degrees, so you still don't want to knock it over.
    I thought about hanging it but like you say, the handle gets really hot when suspended above the flame. It worried me that I might burn myself when handling it, melt the top of my tent, or start a fire.

    Suggestions?

    Mainly, I want to use it to decrease condensation.

  19. #39

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    The handle itself doesn't get that hot from what I saw. Just the top of the lantern itself. By a few inches above it where the handle reaches, the temperature is very safe.

  20. #40
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    I have one and use it during the winter (in one of my older tents; haven't felt completely confident with it my sil-nylon tent), and I can also say that the handle does not get hot. I hang it, and while the top gets *very* hot, it is safe to hang & handle. The column of hot air goes up a few inches. I usually hang it probably 8-10 inches from the roof.
    fortis fortuna adjuvat

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