WhiteBlaze Pages
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$10 for printed copy(paperback). $6 for interactive PDF. $2 for printable PDF.
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26
  1. #1

    Question Official start and end of white mountains and 100 Mile Wilderness on the AT

    Can someone tell me what the official White Mountains and 100 Mile Wilderness start and end points are on the Appalachian Trail, such as in miles from a landmark (road), shelters, etc.?

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-18-2010
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    45
    Posts
    3,133
    Images
    1

    Default

    going NOBO, the white mountains most people would say begins at glencliff, NH. ends is a different story. rt 2 is one possibility, grafton notch (or somewhere ebwteen the 2) is another.

    the 100 MW begins at monson ME and i think ends at the first baxter state park rd you come to. that ones easy. its the big distance between the 2 paved roads.

  3. #3
    Registered User Koozy's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-10-2011
    Location
    Connecticut
    Age
    35
    Posts
    79
    Images
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdoczi View Post
    going NOBO, the white mountains most people would say begins at glencliff, NH. ends is a different story. rt 2 is one possibility, grafton notch (or somewhere ebwteen the 2) is another.

    the 100 MW begins at monson ME and i think ends at the first baxter state park rd you come to. that ones easy. its the big distance between the 2 paved roads.

    White mountains definitely begin heading north out of Glencliff. I think the National forest portion of the WM officially terminates at Rt 2 in Gorham, but it doesn't feel like you're out of the Whites until Grafton Notch or just after the Baldpates.

    100 MW: Monson to Golden Road (Abol Bridge).
    Frankenstein - 2014 GAME
    www.trailjournals.com/kylezontheat

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-18-2010
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    45
    Posts
    3,133
    Images
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Koozy View Post
    White mountains definitely begin heading north out of Glencliff. I think the National forest portion of the WM officially terminates at Rt 2 in Gorham, but it doesn't feel like you're out of the Whites until Grafton Notch or just after the Baldpates.

    100 MW: Monson to Golden Road (Abol Bridge).
    like many things, the whites don't suddenly start or stop. you first encounter something that feels like the whites (if headed nobo) while descending moosilauke. then it goes back to more typical hiking for a good stretch. they really start in earnest when you get to the base of south kinsman, but thats just me. also, the glencliff side of moosilauke isnt in WMNF i dont believe i think the mahoosucs are though? if they arent then i dont know what they do belong to, and i dont feel like they just dont belong to some formal area.

  5. #5
    13-45 Section Hiker Trash
    Join Date
    04-09-2008
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Age
    48
    Posts
    1,081
    Images
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdoczi View Post
    going NOBO, the white mountains most people would say begins at glencliff, NH. ends is a different story. rt 2 is one possibility, grafton notch (or somewhere ebwteen the 2) is another.
    Per the maps it appears that the border of WMNF is at road 25C on the South end and US 2 on the North end. So I would call this the "official" start/end of the Whites.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Berserker View Post
    Per the maps it appears that the border of WMNF is at road 25C on the South end and US 2 on the North end. So I would call this the "official" start/end of the Whites.
    That's as good a definition as any. The Mahoosucs are considered a different range.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  7. #7
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-18-2014
    Location
    Lewiston and Biddeford, Maine
    Age
    59
    Posts
    2,643

    Default

    The White Mountains are not just the National Forest designated parts. It includes the Mahoosucs, also

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-18-2010
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    45
    Posts
    3,133
    Images
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    The White Mountains are not just the National Forest designated parts. It includes the Mahoosucs, also
    its just kind of interesting to me the idea that the hill on the other side of the road is an entirely different mountain range from the one on this side of the road.

    like i said somewhere earlier, i think these things are often more gradual transitions than sudden changes.

    calling moosilauke the start of the whites is more clearcut because of the surrounding terrain

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdoczi View Post
    its just kind of interesting to me the idea that the hill on the other side of the road is an entirely different mountain range from the one on this side of the road.

    like i said somewhere earlier, i think these things are often more gradual transitions than sudden changes.

    calling moosilauke the start of the whites is more clearcut because of the surrounding terrain
    Well, besides being in another State, The Whites are significantly higher then the Mahoosucs. All of a sudden the mountains are a couple thousand feet shorter. Except for Old Speck, but it's an outlier. Doesn't make them any easier.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-18-2010
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    45
    Posts
    3,133
    Images
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    Well, besides being in another State, The Whites are significantly higher then the Mahoosucs. All of a sudden the mountains are a couple thousand feet shorter. Except for Old Speck, but it's an outlier. Doesn't make them any easier.
    well the difference from moriah to success is more like 500 feet.

    i once read somewhere sort of officially and knowledgable sounding that described the mahoosucs as the footbhills of the white mountains. sounded about right.

  11. #11

    Default

    If I happen to bump into one of the geologists who live here in town, I'll have to ask. But as far as I'm concerned, the White Mountains of NH end at the NH line. So, I guess Success is still in the Whites
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-18-2010
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    45
    Posts
    3,133
    Images
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    If I happen to bump into one of the geologists who live here in town, I'll have to ask. But as far as I'm concerned, the White Mountains of NH end at the NH line. So, I guess Success is still in the Whites
    werent we just agreeing in another thread that state lines have no bearing on this?

    Whatever you want to call them, they don't care where the state line is.

    in any practical sense "those really hard mountains that are unlike anything else on the trail" end finally when you get to east flagstaff road. being "done with the whites" doesnt earn you anything any more than being done with GA does, no matter where you think they end.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdoczi View Post
    werent we just agreeing in another thread that state lines have no bearing on this?

    Whatever you want to call them, they don't care where the state line is.

    in any practical sense "those really hard mountains that are unlike anything else on the trail" end finally when you get to east flagstaff road. being "done with the whites" doesnt earn you anything any more than being done with GA does, no matter where you think they end.
    Sort of, we were agreeing it's kind of pointless to hike to a state line just to say you hiked the whole state, if getting to that state line was sort of a pain to do.

    Deciding where various geographic features start and end is different. State lines are often based on geological features. The Androscoggin river is probably where the White mountains officially ends and the Mahoosucs start.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2014
    Location
    Lower 48
    Age
    40
    Posts
    64

    Default

    If were speaking officially, or better, technically, then I'm under the impression that Grafton Notch that sits between Old Speck and Baldpate is the official end of the White Mountains. Thus the Mahoosuc Range is merely a range within the White Mountains. The actual mountains don't care about state lines and park boundaries.

    Baldpate is then the first of the Longfellow Range.

    https://www.peakbagger.com/range.aspx?rid=1612

    I know that's not an official site, but there you go.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-18-2010
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    45
    Posts
    3,133
    Images
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    Sort of, we were agreeing it's kind of pointless to hike to a state line just to say you hiked the whole state, if getting to that state line was sort of a pain to do.

    Deciding where various geographic features start and end is different. State lines are often based on geological features. The Androscoggin river is probably where the White mountains officially ends and the Mahoosucs start.
    yes, geographic features like rivers for sure. state lines though? naaah

    well, if it is its because the state line follows the geographic feature

  16. #16
    4eyedbuzzard's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-02-2007
    Location
    DFW, TX / Northern NH
    Age
    64
    Posts
    8,060
    Images
    27

    Default

    My vote geologically on The Whites would be from north of Enfield, NH all the way through into western ME around Rangeley. There's a common uplift/ridge cut into sections by the many notches, but they are all part of the same uplift. Many smaller named ranges such as Kinsman, Franconia, Mahoosucs - are all part of the larger White Mountains.

  17. #17

    Default

    If you equate the White Mountains with the White Mountain National Forest then you need to go look at the declaration boundary which is the legally defined boundary of the WMNF.The WMNF boundary can not be changed except by act of congress. Like any political action, the boundaries are political compromises. When the boundaries were laid out some towns did not want to be in the WMNF as they legitimately feared they would cease to exist. Large landowners also didn't want to be included as they feared government control. I have no doubt that the Mahoosucs would have been included in the WMNF except that the Brown Company a major regional land owner didnt want to be within the boundary. Rather than expand the WMNF, two national wildlife refuges were created in Northern NH with boundaries that were less political which is watershed boundaries. The two refuges have been aggressively buying and outside the WMNF declaration boundary for close to 30 years as they do not need the same level of congressional action.

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-18-2010
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    45
    Posts
    3,133
    Images
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    My vote geologically on The Whites would be from north of Enfield, NH all the way through into western ME around Rangeley. There's a common uplift/ridge cut into sections by the many notches, but they are all part of the same uplift. Many smaller named ranges such as Kinsman, Franconia, Mahoosucs - are all part of the larger White Mountains.
    so that would loop smarts and cube into the whites? interesting and could very well be but thats not one you hear put forth often.

    but i get what youre saying about uplift.

  19. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-18-2010
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    45
    Posts
    3,133
    Images
    1

    Default

    interesting side note to this just occured to me-

    starting from moosilauke, when you come to a major road youre in kinsman notch. then franconia notch, then crawford notch, then pinkham notch. eventually when you get to rt 27 youre in grafton notch.

    but first you come to.... rt 2 just outside of gorham. does this place for some reason not have a name? or is it just not used? if it has no name, is that somehow related to the discussion of the boundary? is the geological name of that spot just the river or the river valley?

  20. #20

    Default

    The AT has moved around in the Gorham Shelburne area since the original layout. The AT crossing at RT 2 crosses the Androscoggin River Valley. If you look at google maps and zoom in on Gorham you will see how the Androscoggin River which is a fairly major watershed that drains the East side of Northern NH and the border of NW Maine. The river substantially goes North to South until Gorham where it takes very decidedly sharp left turn where it runs into Mt Moriah and Pine Mtn which is the end of ridge heading NE from Mt Madison. There are lot of notches in NH and some in Western Maine some far more distinct than others.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •